Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: May 12, 2008 0 comments
What can JVC do to top one of the best bargains in the 1920x1080 home-projector market, the widely praised DLA-HD1? Priced just a bit over $6000 at its introduction, the HD1 set a new bar for black levels from a home projector—make that from any video projector—and it had no obvious weaknesses in any other area.
Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: May 11, 2008 11 comments

Contrast: The ratio between the brightest part of the picture and the darkest.

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: May 10, 2008 0 comments

Panasonic recently announced the upcoming release of its new DMP-BD50 Blu-ray player, which I got to see in person on May 9 at the Panasonic Hollywood Labs right next to Universal Studios in Los Angeles. The BD50 follows the <A href="http://ultimateavmag.com/hddiscplayers/1107panabd30/">DMP-BD30</A>, which was the first standalone BD player to conform to Final Standard Profile 1.1 (aka BonusView). As you might expect, the new player is fully equipped for BD-Live (Profile 2.0), which lets it access the supplementary Internet content and online interactive features that are planned for future Blu-ray releases by connecting the player to a broadband access point such as a home-network router.

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Apr 18, 2008 0 comments
A chip off the old block?

Panasonic has been making pro video projectors for years, but its first home theater projector to catch my eye was the PT-AE700U. Both that model and its follow-up, the PT-AE900U, were competent 720p LCD designs in deceptively small, businesslike black boxes that offered good value for the money.

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Apr 14, 2008 0 comments
Sometimes you do get what you pay for.

Let’s face it: Even for 60 diagonal inches, $7,500 is a lot of money for a flat-panel HDTV in today’s market. If you pay that kind of coin—assuming you can—you’d better get something very special.

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Apr 10, 2008 6 comments

I can't say I'm as big a <I>Star Trek</I> fan as some. I love the stories and characters, but I'm not into the minutiae. I don't know which deck sickbay is on, couldn't tell you the date the first Enterprise was launched (actually it was Stardate 1814, if you can believe Wikipedia), and don't know a word of Klingon.

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Apr 07, 2008 0 comments
Will there be laser light in your home theater some day? Mitsubishi hopes so. To the best of our knowledge, it is the only company about to use lasers as the light source for some of its DLP-based, rear projection televisions.
Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Apr 07, 2008 0 comments
Big, bodacious, and beautiful.

LCD displays have taken over much of the flat-panel market because they’re bright, they’re flat, and they have become increasingly affordable.

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Apr 04, 2008 0 comments
Apart from the occasional foray into cutting-edge technology that doesn't always pan out (ionic tweeters, anyone?), speaker technology is relatively stable—glacial, even, compared to other consumer-electronics products like flat-panel displays. The manageable pace of speaker development has allowed small- and medium-sized speaker companies to thrive. Most of them make nothing but speakers that remain in production for years, which is a plus for buyers. Unlike that flat-panel display you just got, when you buy a new set of speakers today, you can be reasonably sure they won't be yesterday's news tomorrow.
Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Mar 21, 2008 1 comments

You're got two displays; perhaps a plasma on the wall for day-to-day viewing and a projection screen that drops down in front of it for serious movie watching. Or you want to feed HDMI video to a small screen on your equipment rack as a monitor. Or…whatever. Up to now, it's been difficult to find an affordable device that will split an HDMI source in two. There are a number of such products on the market from companies like Gefen, Key Digital, and PureLink, but they tend to be expensive solutions to a relatively basic problem, often providing more flexibility than you need.

Pages

X