Thomas J. Norton

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Dec 17, 2006 0 comments

A casual glance at the Samsung HL-S5679 rear projection television might suggest that it is just another new 1080p set. Not that this is necessarily a bad thing, but the market is now flooded with them. Some are indifferent, some are good, and a very few are outstanding. But another television with a screen, lens, small imaging chip of some sort, and projection lamp isn't exactly news, particularly in our current, flat-panel-happy marketplace.

Thomas J. Norton Posted: Dec 11, 2006 0 comments

We've waited what seems like an eternity for a top performing Blu-ray Disc player to challenge the head start HD DVD seized when it hit stores this past spring. Blu-ray's launch was dampened by the format's first player being the underperforming and poorly reviewed Samsung BD-P1000, which shipped with an incorrect noise reduction chip setting that caused soft imagery but that has since been corrected by a firmware update (a <I>UAV</I> follow-up is pending).

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Dec 03, 2006 0 comments

You are likely already aware that there is a massive 14-disc, standard DVD <I>Superman Ultimate Collector's Edition</I> boxed set of most, if not all things Superman ($99.98). It includes all four feature films, including both the theatrical cut of <I>Superman II</I> and <I>Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut</I>, 2006's <I>Superman Returns</I>, and enough additional features and details to keep any Supermaniac busy through 2007.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Dec 03, 2006 0 comments

The Sharp XV-Z20000 is the third 1080p single-chip DLP projector to pass through our doors. At $11,999 it bucks a growing trend to less expensive, high resolution projectors. But it's far lower in price than competitors such as the $20,000 <A HREF=" http://ultimateavmag.com/videoprojectors/506marantzvp11s1/"> Marantz VP-11S1</A> or SIM2's $15K <A HREF="http://www.ultimateavmag.com/firstlookvideoprojectors/506sim2ht3000/">
HT3000</A>. And it offers a lot for the money.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Dec 02, 2006 0 comments

You know the gag. You see someone walking down the street and about to step on a banana peel. Do you shout "STOP," or remain silent and then applaud as he does an awesome pirouette.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 16, 2006 0 comments

Panasonic has announced the PT-AE1000U, its first 1920x1080p LCD projector. Priced at $5,999 ($4,000 MAP- Minimum Advertised Price), the unit is said to offer features useful both to consumers and film production studios for use in production and post-production activities.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 10, 2006 4 comments

If stepping off the plane into the Copenhagen airport is a little like stepping into the world's biggest IKEA store, then stepping out of the tiny airport in Karup, Denmark is a little like transporting to the farmlands of Nebraska. But my mission to the far west end of the Jutland peninsula, together with a number of other European and North American journalists, was not sightseeing, but information. Information about what Struer, Denmark manufacturer B&O is currently about, and how the activities in its several facilities are leading to interesting new products, and how those products are influenced by the thinking and research behind them.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 10, 2006 1 comments

"The Cube" is the first stop in testing a B&O loudspeaker. At 12x12x13 meters it is the world's largest privately owned sound test room. It is not an anechoic chamber. Instead, B&O built a space large enough to use MLS measurements to a high degree of precision. MLS measures the speaker's response to an impulse. This result is then gated to eliminate the effect of the sound reflected off the walls. The reproduced and filtered impulse is then converted back to a frequency response (techies will recognize this as a Fourier transformation). The two walls of the chamber are damped, not to eliminate reflections but to speed up the time between impulses (a number of impulses are averaged for greater precision). The support structure shown here holds the loudspeaker (in the photo it's one of B&O's very tall, pencil-thin designs). The mike is visible in the distance. Measurements are made in 140 different directions.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 10, 2006 0 comments

This is the R&D prototype for the BeoLab5, shown with the project's lead designer, Gert Munch.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 10, 2006 0 comments

Speakers for cordless phones, another B&O product category, must be tiny. Looks like it also might make an interesting tweeter, though probably not, as the frequency response of telephone drivers is band limited by design.

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