Mike Prince

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Mike Prince Posted: Feb 05, 2007 0 comments
Video: 2
Audio: 2
Extras: 3
Ah, the joys of high school: acne, proms, SATs, vengeance. At least that’s what John Tucker Must Die leads me to believe. See, John Tucker is the BMOC, the basketball captain, and a playa with the ladies. Unfortunately, three of John’s ladies (all WB girls, I think) have found out about one another and enlist the help of the new girl, Katie, to enact revenge. Hijinks and female empowerment ensue.
Mike Prince Posted: Feb 05, 2007 0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 4
Extras: 5
Bloggers across the globe have said so much about Snakes on a Plane—even months before the film was released—except for the one thing that matters. Is the movie any good? The short answer is, no, it’s not good. Not by a long shot.
Mike Prince Posted: Feb 05, 2007 Published: Jan 05, 2007 0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 3
Extras: 4
Aaron Eckhart owns the screen as tobacco lobbyist Nick Naylor in Jason Reitman’s Thank You for Smoking, an acerbic and wickedly funny view of spin control in the modern age. A star-studded cast fills out this comedy, but it’s Eckhart who commands your attention as Naylor tries to soften the image of tobacco in this health-conscious day and age. Whether convincing Hollywood to embrace smoking again, raising his young son, or going up against the U.S. Senate, Eckhart keeps the film together in a delicious performance.
Mike Prince Posted: Feb 05, 2007 Published: Jan 05, 2007 0 comments
Pixar Perfect
With
Cars, Pixar proves once again that they can’t make a bad product.

Video: 5
Audio: 5
Extras: 5

Mike Prince Posted: Feb 02, 2007 Published: May 02, 2006 0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 4
Extras: 3
Suburban angst and dysfunction are prime fodder for films and TV, whether it be housewives that seem desperate or disaffected teens too heavily medicated to even communicate with each other. The Chumscrubber falls into the latter category and presents a world all too familiar, while retaining its individuality in the genre.
Mike Prince Posted: Nov 13, 2006 0 comments
Video: 3
Audio: 2
Extras: 4
The mind of an artist is a frightening place, more so if you’re Daniel Johnston. The Devil and Daniel Johnston is a documentary about this troubled “genius,” covering those closest to him as he’s grappled with mental illness and unlimited artistic vision. Using an inexhaustible amount of archival footage, the film paints a portrait of Johnston, showcasing his artistic endeavors from childhood to recent years. Countless fans across the globe celebrate his work, hailing the cult hero.
Mike Prince Posted: Nov 13, 2006 0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 4
Extras: 3
Thanks to gangsta rappers and the white suburban kids who worship them, we are blessed with yet another version of Brian De Palma’s bloody, operatic masterpiece. The story hasn’t changed since the last edition was released three years ago—only the sound effects have. The “all new” Platinum Edition comes complete with all new digitally remastered sound and picture that only seems like more of the same. Granted, it’s a better option than going the Lucas route and adding unnecessary robots or the sound of a vacuum when Pacino snorts mountains of coke. However, if you already own Scarface, this edition is needless.
Mike Prince Posted: Jul 07, 2006 0 comments
Video: 5
Audio: 5
Extras: 4
Make no mistake—this is the exact same edition that was released over a year ago. The only difference is the addition of a third disc (despite the package's Two-Disc status) touting the virtues of the recent sequel Underworld: Evolution. As it stands, the movie is still rather weak.
Mike Prince Posted: Apr 20, 2006 0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 4
Extras: 4
Revenge is a dish best served cold, and, in John Singleton's Four Brothers, it's taken rather literally. Set in the icy tundra of Detroit in the wintertime, the film follows four foster brothers who return home to exact vengeance upon the killer of their mother. Led by tough brother (although they're all tough) Mark Wahlberg, the brothers hunt down those responsible. After one of the weakest expository scenes in recent memory, the movie picks up steam and delivers a solid experience.
Mike Prince Posted: Apr 05, 2006 0 comments
Video: 3
Audio: 4
Extras: 3
The Yards is a moody little film noir that, while pretty to look at, doesn't become the movie it desperately wants to be. It's cut cleanly from the Mean Streets cloth, as it tells the story of Leo (Mark Wahlberg, barely making eye contact with anyone), a recently paroled thief. Leo's attempts to go straight run afoul by his Uncle Frank (James Caan, sporting a nice mustache) and best friend Willie (Joaquin Phoenix), both shady characters involved in the corrupt world of railroad contractors. There's also some creepy sexual undertones between Leo and his cousin Erica (a pre-Oscar Charlize Theron). The visuals (in anamorphic 2.35:1) seem kind of foggy, which seems to be the director's intention but does not look very good. The Dolby Digital 5.1 is the highlight of the entire package, providing a rich soundscape that achieves what the film as a whole could not.

Pages

X
Enter your Sound & Vision username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading