Geoffrey Morrison

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments
Light is good. Light and mirrors are better.

Digital Light Processing is finally getting the recognition it deserves. It's not as hot a technology as plasma, but people are beginning to realize that it's an appetizing alternative—especially since it offers many of the strengths and few of the weaknesses of other digital display technologies. Texas Instruments is the creator and sole manufacturer of DLP chips, and their latest offering is the HD2+ (or Mustang) chip. But it all started long before the arrival of HD2+.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: May 28, 2004 Published: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments
Why buy an enhanced-def plasma when you can get a high-def projector?

By more than $1,000, this projector is less expensive than the average price of the RPTVs in our February 2004 HDTV Face Off. Granted, you need to buy a screen (there goes that $1,000), but you'd then have the same resolution as half of the TVs in the Face Off and be able to put that image on a screen that could be up to twice as large diagonally. Boy, I love projectors.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments
Pioneer's latest isn't just a plasma, it's an HDTV.

For a display to be called an HDTV, it has to have a built-in ATSC tuner. Many of the RPTVs in last month's Face Off were so equipped, but Pioneer's Elite PRO-1110HD is the first plasma we've reviewed that has one. It seems so simple, especially when you consider that this plasma (like others) has an external box for all of its inputs. How hard could it be to stick a tuner in there? Shoehorns are cheap. In fact, Pioneer has included ATSC tuners in all four of their new plasma sets.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments
DLP, CRT, and LCD battle to the death.

I blame myself. Two years ago, I was strapped into a 767 surrounded by screaming babies, seat-kicking toddlers, and former senior technical editor Mike Wood. We were on our way to CEDIA, and Primedia was nice enough to book us first class. No wait, that's a lie. We were in steerage. At one point, I innocently turned to Mike and mentioned that we had several rear-projection TVs at our Woodland Hills studio and maybe we should have a Face Off. I recognized the look that crept onto Mike's face. I tried to bolt, but there's only so far you can get when there's a seatback 3 inches from your kneecaps. (Sorry to whomever was sitting in front of me.)

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments
A Combi for Everyone

It's finally happened. No longer does the desire for high-resolution audio mean that you must decide between two formats or max out your credit card on one of the high-end combi units. With the DV-563A, Pioneer has released a DVD player that not only offers progressive scanning and multichannel SACD and DVD-Audio playback, but it costs only slightly more than an entry-level DVD player. The difference in price is so slight that anyone looking for a DVD player would be insane not to look at the DV-563A. Keep reading because, believe it or not, the review's not over.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments
Bigger than a direct-view, smaller than a big-screen, Tabletop TVs offer an almost perfect balance between two sides of the TV world. On one side of that world, you have the direct-view TV's small footprint and commensurate aesthetic niceties. However, with a maximum 40-inch-diagonal screen size (38-inch for 16:9 models), these sets aren't very big. On the other side, you've got big-screen rear-projection TVs, which offer a much bigger image at the expense of a much bigger footprint on your carpet. Until recently, almost all RPTVs were quite an eyesore. Even now, no matter how nice an RPTV may look, it's still a huge box taking up real estate in your living room. On the other hand, tabletop TVs like the CRT-based Toshiba 46HX83 offer a far more-pleasing aesthetic and larger screen sizes than are available in the direct-view category.
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 10, 2003 Published: Nov 01, 2003 0 comments
Fujitsu's new plasma is more than just a pretty face.

Ah, plasma. There's nothing sexier in the home theater world. Where else can you get a bright, sharp image without any box to speak of? It just hangs there on your wall and attracts attention like a supermodel walking into your local Denny's.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 09, 2003 Published: Aug 01, 2003 0 comments
This projector's so bright, you've gotta wear shades.

18.1 foot-lamberts. This light output would be impressive for any front projector. What makes it amazing is that I measured 18.1 ft-L on a 7.5-foot-wide (100-inch-diagonal) Grayhawk screen with a 0.9 gain. If you were to use this projector on a 6-foot-wide (82.5-inch-diagonal) Studiotek 130 screen (which has a gain of +1.3), you'd get an almost-blinding 48.6 ft-L. With that kind of light output, you'd be able to use a screen larger than 12 feet wide (165 inches diagonally) and still have a bright, watchable image. And that's in the low-power mode.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jun 27, 2003 Published: Jun 28, 2003 0 comments
Four speaker systems. One verdict. Five hungry editors.

Two Californians, a Canadian, and an Israeli walk into a bar. No, wait. It was an apothecary. Two Californians, a Canadian, and an Israeli walk into an apothecary. They say, "Ow." No. They order a drink. No. They make speakers. Yes. That's it, they make speakers, and we've gathered their sub/sat systems together here: the PSB Alpha B from the great white north, the Morel Spiro from the other side of the planet, and NHT and M&K systems from what many people consider to be a different planet. They range in price from just under $1,400 to just over $1,900. To make things interesting in this land of reality TV shows, we will ceremoniously eat the loser of this Face Off. Next on Fox: When Hungry Editors Attack. Intrigued? So am I, and I already know how it ends.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: May 12, 2003 Published: May 13, 2003 0 comments
Funny name; serious TV.

Sony insists that I pronounce this TV's name correctly: Wega (Vay-guh). I think Wegg-ah is so much more amusing. Perhaps Wee-ga. If only Sony had gone all out and put an "e" at the end of Grand. I can hear the annoyance of salespeople everywhere as customers come in looking for one of them thar Grand-ee Wee-gas. It's too bad that the rest of the model nomenclature is hard to poke fun at. After all, how funny is KF-50XBR800? KF-50Exburrerr… never mind. Names aside, the TV itself is very hard to make fun of. Mostly.

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