Geoffrey Morrison

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Feb 07, 2006 0 comments
The details on all things video.

I'm sure many of you read over the measurement boxes in our video reviews, take what you need from them, and move on. But what does it all mean, really? Why do we do it the way we do? For those of you new to the magazine or video displays in general, what does any of it mean? These are excellent questions.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 31, 2006 Published: Jan 01, 2006 0 comments
How much do LCDs and plasmas really suck?

You know those little plastic plug thingies you put in electrical outlets so that kids don't stick their fingers and such into them? Turns out, they're there for a reason. My parents dutifully put these in all the outlets in our house, and, when I was just past the age where they figured I couldn't possibly be stupid enough to stick anything into an outlet, I found an innocent little piece of copper wire. At this point, you can see where this story is headed. Lacking any polyvinyl chloride polymer to impede my process, and always having an inquisitive mind, I inserted said wire into said outlet. The results were predictable. I believe vaporization was involved. Since then, I've had a healthy (ahem) respect for electricity.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 31, 2006 11 comments
Just a quick one for now: What’s your favorite TV show and why?
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 24, 2006 18 comments
Panasonic was in town showing off some of their newest goodies. I was lured out of the HT Lab/Batcave with the promise of pie and punch. There was neither. They did have a cool demo of what they call HDAVI. This allows you, if you have all Panasonic gear with HDAVI hooked up with HDMI, to turn on all your components (DVD player, receiver, plasma), switch to the right inputs, and start a movie, just by pressing one button. Sounds cool eh? What would be really great is that if all consumer electronics companies adopted the same standard so that this would work with every component. Come on, a boy can dream can’t he?
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 19, 2006 11 comments
Sorry, I made a mistake in the February issue Face Off. In the opening and closing charts, I refer to the Toshiba as the 62MX195. We reviewed the 62HM195, which is what it says everywhere else in the text. Two letters in fifteen pages. I’m a failure, I know.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 17, 2006 4 comments
Ok, so Friday meant Tuesday. Here are two more items I saw at CES that were cool and a bit different.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 11, 2006 Published: Jul 11, 2005 0 comments
Video: 5
Audio: 5
Extras: 2
House of Flying Daggers is, in many ways, similar to many other martial-arts movies you've seen (most notably, the crazily popular Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon). It has all of the action and incredible fight sequences we've come to expect from the best Hong Kong exports. From a visual standpoint, though, it has more in common with the stylized color works of Japanese director Akira Kurosawa. And what visuals they are. In Hero, director Yimou Zhang used massive amounts of color. Sometimes entire shots would be one color. Here, that is rarely the case, but color is no smaller a tool—just a more finely honed one. The story is of a love affair between an assassin and a policeman as a war builds around them.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 11, 2006 4 comments
Here are the rest of the pictures I took at CES . Well, the rest that were worth anything. I have a few other products I saw at the show that I’ll talk about later, probably Friday.
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 11, 2006 0 comments
A few images from CES 2006

I took a bunch more pictures at CES than I could put in my blog. So here's the better ones.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 10, 2006 Published: Jan 11, 2006 0 comments
Dipping into the black (level).

Despite my lauding of projectors, it seems like the only question people ask me about TVs is, "What's the best plasma?" I usually respond, as you would imagine, with a detailed description of the strengths and weaknesses of several brands, what that means to the viewer, and a cost/performance analysis. All the while, I'm trying to ignore the bored and distracted look on my questioner's face. "Yeah, but who's the best?" he'll ask. "The Patriots," I reply. At this point, the average questioner's face scrunches up to resemble the average raisin. In an effort to finish the conversation so that I can be left alone to eat my burrito in peace (mmm, Chipotle), I tell them: "Panasonic for black level; Pioneer for processing." There, I said it. There are plenty of companies that make great-looking plasmas, but these guys are the leaders. They shine with regard to their respective specialties but don't screw up the rest of the display. What I love about this business, though, is that nothing is stagnant—everything advances. Just last month, I reviewed a Panasonic plasma that went a long way in improving the company's major processing shortcomings. While its black level was still good, its scaling improved for a much better-looking image overall. So, it's Pioneer's turn. Their processing, on all levels, has been good in the past. Their black levels, on the other hand, have left much to be desired. I was told that Pioneer's past few models have improved black levels. We'll see.

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