Geoffrey Morrison

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 08, 2007 2 comments
Sony revealed the KDL-70XBR3. It’s 1080p, has LED backlighting, and has what Sony calls “x.v. Color.” This means it is capable of the xvYCC color space, a first. To let you take advantage of that, Sony also released four new HD video cameras that are also xvYCC capable. The TV will be available in February at the low, low bargain price of $33,000.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 03, 2007 3 comments
Everyone wants a matched system, so how about some speakers to match your plasma? That’s right, plasma speakers. These puppies will really wow the neighbors. They’re not common, and the seller buries the most important sentence in the middle of the posting “Measurable amounts of O2 (ozone) are produced during operation.” Let’s not nitpick that ozone is actually O3. The next sentence is even better “Some people claim they are sensitive to this in the room, others find it fresh smelling or don’t notice it!” Yeah, until it kills you. Leave a door open, turn out the lights, and marvel at the pretty tweeters that make sound with "light." Get 'em while they're hot (literally).
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 30, 2006 Published: Dec 03, 2006 0 comments
Gear is hot. Hot is bad.

As I'm sure you've noticed by now, nearly every piece of electronic equipment you own creates heat. Some, like projectors, create a lot. Others, like DVD players, don't create very much at all. Depending on how you have your gear set up, though, any heat can create a problem. What's worse, you may not even know there's a problem until it's too late. There are solutions, though, and they vary depending on how you store your gear.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 30, 2006 Published: Nov 13, 2006 0 comments
60? Who needs 60?

As I've mentioned in the past, one of my least favorite artifacts in the video world is the motion blur that flat-panel LCDs exhibit. Not everyone is as allergic to this as I am, and that's fine. I tend not to be bothered by DLP rainbows; some are. So, we all have our things.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 28, 2006 25 comments
As I’ve talked about before, console games have to be written for a specific resolution (unlike computer games). Nearly every Xbox 360 game, for example, is 720p. The console then converts that up or down depending on how you set up the console. Those with older TVs drop it to 480i, those with HD sets can choose 720p or 1080i (and occasionally 1080p).
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 21, 2006 Published: Nov 22, 2006 0 comments
Less than meets the eye.

The most frequently asked questions I've received this year have been about the difference between 1080i and 1080p. Many people felt—or others erroneously told them—that their brand-new 1080p TVs were actually 1080i, as that was the highest resolution they could accept on any input. I did a blog post on this topic and received excellent questions, which I followed up on. It is an important enough question—and one that creates a significant amount of confusion—that I felt I should address it here, as well.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 17, 2006 5 comments
At midnight last night, the very first PlayStation 3s were sold. To herald the even, there were huge launch parties in New York and San Francisco. A few of us journalist types were brought up to check it all out.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 15, 2006 3 comments
Check out the my new review of the $1000 720p Optoma here.
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 15, 2006 0 comments
HD projection on a budget.

Sure, 1080p is getting all the buzz, but even the cheapest 1080p displays are still really pricey. For example, the lowest-priced 1080p projector is 4.5 times the price of this little Optoma. The HD70, while "only" 720p, has a distinction all its own that makes it one of the coolest products to come out in months: It's the lowest-priced HD projector ever.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 06, 2006 0 comments
Not that it's new, but I forgot to mention that I posted the rest of my pictures from CEATEC in the Galleries. You can check them out here

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