Geoffrey Morrison

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 30, 2014 3 comments
2D Performance
3D Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $999

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Bright 1080p for $1,000
No rainbows (for those who care)
Minus
Contrast ratio is mediocre
Color accuracy is only average

THE VERDICT
Despite a bright image, poor contrast and otherwise average performance put Epson’s 1080p budget projector out of contention at the $1,000 price point.

I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised it was bright. I mean, it’s an Epson projector; of course it was going to be bright. But 42 foot-lamberts and 1080p for $1,000? That’s not too shabby. It’s perhaps even more impressive that all of that light bursts forth from such a tiny package.

Small, bright, a pair of HDMI inputs, even 3D capability: The PowerLite Home Cinema 2030 ticks all the boxes for a projector in our modern era. But box ticking is one thing, and not the thing we’re interested in.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 24, 2014 Published: Jan 23, 2014 0 comments
This is a bit of an odd review. This is a review of two products I’ve already reviewed.

What’s cool is these two products are finally together, and they really deserved to be together.

One is an in-dash entertainment system, the other is a cool automotive data app. Together they’re awesome.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 03, 2014 1 comments
You’re going to find this hard to believe, but even I make mistakes. I cover this stuff for a living, and in my personal tech life I screwed up some things in 2013.

I’d like to think I can learn from my mistakes, and like any “teaching moment,” I figured I’d share a few of these semi-painful revelations in the hopes you won’t suffer the same fates.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 27, 2013 0 comments
It has been an interesting year for tech. Which is a pretty dumb thing to write, since every year is an interesting year for tech, and more interesting than the year before.

But a year is a lot to take in. So here are some highlights you may have missed.

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Geoffrey Morrison Lauren Dragan Posted: Dec 12, 2013 0 comments
All other headphones bow to these. All other headphones are NOTHING compared to these. These are, to put it simply, a collection of the greatest headphones on Earth.

One of them even looks like bacon.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 08, 2013 0 comments
Above the streets of Hollywood, at the top of the swanky W Hotel, Panasonic held a party to show off their upcoming 4K tablet.

That’s right, a tablet with 4K resolution.

What I wasn’t expecting is that it’s huge. I guess it’s still technically a tablet with a 20-inch 15:10 screen, but wow.

They also had their new 4K LCD. Fellow S&Ver Lauren Dragan and I headed to Hollywood and Vine to check it out (that’s where the hotel is, not just some random location we wandered by).

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 01, 2013 1 comments
After years of speculation and skepticism, drooling and disappointment, longing, frustration, and pensive excitement, Organic Light-Emitting Diode televisions are finally available. OLED (oh-lead, if you like), is the first true next-generation HDTV technology since LCDs emerged from their nascent toy stage and started stomping all over plasma TVs.
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 01, 2013 1 comments
As I expected, I’ve been playing a lot of Battlefield 4. In some ways, my initial thoughts were correct, this really is a polish of BF3.

However, what I didn't expect, is that in that polish, it’s actually a better game. A definite improvement over its predecessor. The little tweaks and changes combine to make something greater than the parts marginally improved.

Thoughts and such, after the jump.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 21, 2013 0 comments
Performance
Build Quality
Value
PRICE $1,795

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Includes lens and projector attachment mount
Accommodates 8- to 18-foot focal distance
Minus
Some loss of horizontal resolution
Finicky setup/installation process

THE VERDICT
The CineVista lens provides a brighter and more detailed-looking image for ultra-wide movies on a 2.35:1 projection screen.

High-def televisions and projectors have an aspect ratio of 16:9. And all native HDTV content comes in that same format, which is also known as 1.78:1. It’s a different situation, however, for movies. Many blockbuster releases from the 1950s onward have a much wider aspect ratio of 2.25:1 or 2.40:1 (often called CinemaScope). When you watch these on your TV, the result of the mismatch is black bars at the top and bottom of the screen.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 11, 2013 2 comments
Battlefield is back, though thanks to an endless supply of add-on packs, it doesn’t feel like it ever left. Right now you can play the upcoming BF4 for free, as part of an open beta. Is it worth checking out? What does the beta say about the new game? Will it be worth buying? I’ve been playing for many, many hours, so that should probably tell you the answer to at least one of those questions. The rest revealed after the jump.

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