Daniel Kumin

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Daniel Kumin Posted: Oct 12, 2010 0 comments

Like some 40 million other people, I love my iPhone. It’s always with me, serving as everything from trail-finder to stock ticker to guitar tuner to, occasionally, mobile phone. While fumbling in the dark with the minimum three or four remote controls that my ever-shifting A/V system requires just to watch a movie, I’ve often wondered if there was “an app for that.”

Daniel Kumin Posted: Mar 05, 2002 0 comments

The two-tiered THX certification system for A/V components reminds me of canned black olives: the smallest ones you can buy are labeled "large," and they range upward from there to "jumbo," "colossal," and, I suppose, "gargantuan." Similarly, the lowest THX rating, THX Select, is awarded to very good midprice gear, while THX Ultra2 (an upgrade of plain ol

Daniel Kumin Posted: Dec 23, 2010 0 comments

A check of Onkyo's Web site shows no fewer than 17 different A/V receivers on offer, an almost General Motors-like profusion of models. (I'm pretty certain, however, the U.S. government won't be stepping in on Onkyo's behalf should the consumer elec- tronics industry go south.) To be fair, a half-dozen or so are last year?s models, but still. C'mon, guys, 17???

Filed under
Daniel Kumin Posted: Jan 30, 2012 0 comments

It seems like there have been Paradigm Monitor-series speakers roaming the earth since shortly after Rice and Kellog patented the dynamic loudspeaker as we know it in 1924. (The original practical design was by Peter Jensen, co-founder of Magnavox, some years earlier.) And as the arrival of its “Series 7” might suggest, the Canadian maker’s Monitor family does in fact date back a couple of decades. Like the speakers that preceded them, Paradigm’s new Monitor models are benchmarks of performance/value quotient in the best Canadian-speaker tradition: rationally priced, excellent-performing, technically advanced designs that compete very effectively with some far more costly “high-end” designs.

So what has changed for Series 7? According to Paradigm, the answer is smaller, deeper, broader: The new models are smaller in size (and so more décor-friendly), yet thanks to redesigned waveguides and the adoption of aluminum bass/mid cones and tweeter domes, they offer improved low-frequency extension and smoother, wider off-axis response. In other words, just like before — but more so.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Feb 22, 2009 0 comments
The Short Form
$1,900 / YAMAHA.COM/USA / 800-492-6242
Snapshot

Photo Gallery

Daniel Kumin Posted: Oct 13, 2003 0 comments

Photos by Tony Cordoza Not too long ago, a loyal Sound & Vision reader wrote complaining that the "audio/video" preamps and receivers we regularly review are really just plain-audio components with a few video inputs and switching thrown in. Point taken. So here's an A/V component with some actual video: the Rotel RSP-1098.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Jun 03, 2007 0 comments

Used to be even the most basic receiver came with two accessories: a cheap wire dipole FM antenna and a plastic-loop AM job (which most often seemed to degrade reception). You still get the antennae, even if nobody except dental-office denizens listens to much terrestrial radio anymore. But you get a lot more with your receiver today.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Aug 17, 2004 0 comments

Flat-panel TV is the 900-pound gorilla currently ruling the home theater roost. More and more people are deciding that, yeah, a steep price, grayish blacks, and the occasional digital video glitch really are worth it for a hang-on-the-wall TV that's big, bright, and bodacious - décor-wise.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Oct 02, 1988 0 comments

AudioControl's Maestro M2e/Savoy duo produced very impressive power in all tests, with the Savoy generating more watts than expected from such a relatively compact and light amplifier. It met its 150 watts-per-channel spec even with all seven channels driven simultaneously and surpassed it by wide margins in our stereo and five-channel trials.

Pages

X
Enter your Sound & Vision username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading