Bob Ankosko

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Bob Ankosko Posted: Dec 23, 2014 1 comments
LG 65EC9700 65-Inch Ultra HD OLED TV

LG made headlines this past summer with the announcement that its 55-inch OLED TV would sell for $3,500. Not cheap, but a whopping 75 percent less than what its predecessor sold for. Then along came the 65EC9700, a TV capable of delivering lush OLED images in 4K resolution that sells for $10,000. LG made headlines again—this time for making television’s holy grail a reality. We spoke with Tim Alessi, director of new product development, for the story behind this inspiring 65-inch hybrid.

Bob Ankosko Posted: Dec 19, 2014 7 comments
At Sound & Vision, we’re constantly looking for subwoofers that outperform the competition and rise to the top of their price class. Here’s our list of the best subwoofers you can buy with recommendations in three price categories: less than $1,000, $1,000 to $4,000, and $5,000 and up.
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Bob Ankosko Posted: Dec 08, 2014 0 comments
TV—specifically 4K/Ultra HD and OLED—top the holiday shopping lists of Sound & Vision readers who responded to last week’s poll question: “What’s Your Top AV Gift Pick for 2014?” Ultra HD netted 22 percent of the votes, followed by OLED TV (15 percent), AV receiver (14 percent), and headphones (9 percent). Regular old HDTV was a distant second to OLED, gaining only 4 percent of the votes, proving once again that the S&V crowd is all about the latest and greatest technology. Here are the full results:
Bob Ankosko Posted: Nov 26, 2014 Published: Nov 25, 2014 4 comments
Wondering if you should step up and buy a new TV this holiday season? Take our 30 second quiz...
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Bob Ankosko Posted: Nov 24, 2014 0 comments
Forget the slippers, ties, socks, and countless other predictably boring gifts. Be a holiday hero and shower your loved ones with entertainment and technology. Here we present a dozen amazing gifts for your consideration. At prices ranging from $30 to $400, we hope you’ll be able to find a match or two for the special folks on your holiday shopping list. Worst case, you’ll come up with a few ideas for yourself.
Bob Ankosko Posted: Nov 24, 2014 0 comments
Audiophiles have long been enamored with the lifelike presentation of electrostatic speakers but vexed with having to sit precisely in the sweet spot to enjoy the glorious sound. Canada’s Muraudio aims to change that with the “world’s first omnidirectional electrostatic speaker,” the Domain Omni ESL, perfected over more than a decade by company founder and chief technology officer, Murray Harman.
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Bob Ankosko Posted: Nov 13, 2014 2 comments
Just what the world needs—another Bluetooth speaker. Must be a couple thousand of them on the market by now, and from what we can tell, a good many of ’em pretty much, well, suck. But a few things about the Core caught our eye. For starters, it costs $599—pret-ty darn steep in a market dominated by sub-$100 “wireless wonders”—and it’s designed by Mass Fidelity, a Canadian startup that impressed us with its Relay Bluetooth receiver (Sound & Vision, February/March 2014).
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Bob Ankosko Posted: Nov 10, 2014 0 comments
An ultra-quiet motorized projection screen, six-way Roku-ready HDMI switcher, audiophile CD player/music streamer, and more.
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Bob Ankosko Posted: Oct 24, 2014 0 comments
A kick-ass, ultra-wide soundbar, add-on ambient lighting for TVs, a new Slingbox, and more.
Bob Ankosko Posted: Oct 14, 2014 0 comments
Performance
Build Quality
Value
Price $40

At A Glance
Plus
Stupidly simply setup
Multiroom music on a shoestring

Minus
Doesn’t work with landline, DSL, or Internet phone service
Limited by the number and location of phone jacks in the house
Subject to the vagaries of existing wires running through the walls
A less-than-hi-fi solution

The Verdict
Moxivo provides a low-tech, down-and-dirty way to shuttle music through dormant phone lines, but don’t expect audiophile quality.

In “A New Use for Old Wires” we described Intellegg’s Moxivo multiroom music kit, which is nothing more than a set of inexpensive cables that lets cord cutters use dormant phone lines to spread music around the house. It sounds great in theory but I was curious to see how well the “system” actually works, so I sought out a cord cutting household (I have Internet phone service at home, which is a no-no). As a new homeowner, my twenty-something son has no intention of signing up for traditional phone service, so his 18-year-old two-story home offered a perfect environment for the test.

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