Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Sep 16, 2016 0 comments
Samsung’s booth was very small (the same was true of both Sony and LG—common at CEDIA as the big TV makers guard their piggy banks until CES). While nothing was truly new, they did effectively demonstrate their sound-bar based Atmos audio system, and lined up three of their flagship KS9800 curved SUHD sets to wow the crowds.
Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Sep 16, 2016 0 comments
In-wall, on-wall, and other such custom installation products are a staple at CEDIA. Free-standing speakers? Not so much. Though there’s an ample supply of those (some of which we’ve written up in other show blogs), CES in January is where new box speakers go to be launched.

TruAudio’s BD-8 WT/BK encloses its 2-way speaker in a pendant designed to be hung from the ceiling...

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Sep 16, 2016 0 comments
In an earlier blog I suggested that SIM2 with its new Nero4 projector was the first to use TI’s new pseudo 4K chip, meaning that it uses pixel shifting on its digital micromirrors to put the full resolution of a 4K source on screen, but not all at once. Half of the resolution is presented first, then microseconds later the mirrors shift by a fraction of a pixel and the rest of the image is displayed. Sounds fishy if you haven’t seen it, but it works...
Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Sep 16, 2016 0 comments
While Epson’s projector demos at CEDIA were designed to impress custom installers and the press (the latter hard to please but pussycats when you win them over), it did show this short throw projector designed for the business market...
Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Sep 16, 2016 0 comments
Shown here are two of the new drivers used in RBH’s new Signature Reference speakers, as discussed in a previous blog—a new AMT tweeter (replacing the previous dome) and a new bass-midrange.
Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Sep 16, 2016 0 comments
The introduction and demonstration of Epson’s new(ish) Pro Cinema LS10500 Laser Diode illuminated 4Ke projector was one of the highlights of the show. It differs from the previous LS10500 mainly in the inclusion of HDR-capability.

The “e” in the 4Ke designation indicates that this projector, like all of the relatively affordable projectors available from Epson and JVC, uses pixel shift to display a 4K input...

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Sep 16, 2016 0 comments
Wolf Cinema demonstrated its SDC15 projector ($23,000 with Wolf’s outboard processor, $15,000 without) in a room it shared with RBH Sound. The latter included premier models from the RBH Signature Reference Series, upgraded with a new AMT tweeter and other refinements...
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Sep 07, 2016 8 comments

Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $4,500

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Excellent blacks and shadow detail
First-rate resolution
Compelling high dynamic range
Minus
HDR limited to HDR10
No 3D

THE VERDICT
In some important respects, Samsung’s new top-of-the-line TV improves upon the company’s previous flagship, and at a lower price.

When we last reviewed one of Samsung’s so-called SUHD sets, Ultra HD with high dynamic range (HDR) was not yet available on Blu-ray. But the arrival of such discs—together with UHD Bluray players like Samsung’s own UBD-K8500—has changed the game.

The 4K resolution of Ultra HD sets is all well and good, but HDR is the most eye-popping feature of UHD. Not all 4K sets, however, incorporate HDR, and those that do don’t necessarily perform at the same level. HDR still can’t be done well cheaply; at present, the displays that do it best are their respective makers’ premier offerings. The Samsung KS9800 series definitely belongs in that company—and among the three models within that family, the 65-incher we’re discussing here is the smallest.

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Sep 06, 2016 0 comments
We tend to forget that not all readers have been around the block when it comes to the language of video. Those that have know the tricks of the trade, and what all of the terminology means. True, even they’re sometimes mistaken, and we ourselves can get caught out from time to time with what’s being offered this year (or this week!) in the ever changing high definition (HD) and ultra high definition (UHD) world.

But manufacturers seldom offer much help in this, or even do their best to obfuscate. In their specs, descriptions, and promotional copy, one thing you won’t find clearly stated is what their products won’t do...

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Aug 30, 2016 3 comments
I like to think that have a broad taste in movie and television entertainment. I don’t much care for crime dramas, horror, gross-out comedies, or westerns (having lived through the era where westerns dominated evening television). I like historical films (either epics or straight dramas), science fiction, contemporary drama, and animation.

And there can be little doubt that the latter is on fire and in the midst of a new golden age. The first such era was centered almost exclusively on the early work of Walt Disney. It survived for about 25 years, from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) to The Jungle Book (1967). I’d argue, however, that there were only six true classics from that period...

Pages

X