Darryl Wilkinson

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 09, 2012 0 comments
Lutron used CEDIA 2011 to announce the company’s ground-breaking wireless, battery-powered, insulating honeycomb cellular shades that could be remotely controlled through handheld remotes or when integrated with Lutron RadioRA 2 lighting control systems. This year, Lutron announced additions to the wireless shade lineup, but these shades have wires – guide wires, that is. In most respects identical to the original wireless honeycomb shades, the new cable-guided shades have a thin cable running from top to bottom along the left and right sides of the shade. The cable prevents the shade from swaying, so it’s ideal for use on French doors or windows with heavy airflow. The cable guides also allow the shades to be used to cover skylights or angled windows. (Lutron says the shades will work in situations with angles as shallow as 30 degrees off horizontal.) The new shades will begin shipping in January of 2013. Pricing was not immediately available but was not expected to include a significant premium over the original shade configurations.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 09, 2012 0 comments
The new WATTBOX line of rack-mount and standalone power surge/conditioners and power strips from SnapAV got the VIP treatment in the SnapAV booth at CEDIA. WATTBOX models utilize compact chasses with greater spacing between individual outlets, and the rack-mount models can even be angled and recessed when installed in a component rack. Optional 1 RU front-mounted faceplate units are connected to the outlet bank by an RJ45 cable along with a separate power cable. The front faceplate displays voltage and current along with dual conveniently located charging ports. SnapAV says the new metal chassis products start at $59.95 (up to $489.95 MSRP). The optional display sells for around $120.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 09, 2012 2 comments
Pro Control says that the company is a new remote control brand that was created by super-custom remote control maker Remote Technologies Inc (RTI) to bring a line of more affordable – yet still customizable – remote control solutions to the market. Shown here at CEDIA were the Pro24.r 2.4-inch color touchscreen remote control that. The $250 MSRP remote can be used as a standalone remote or as a more elaborate remote control system when used in conjunction with the $250 MSRP ProLink.r central processor that offers one-way control capabilities when used with the Pro24.r, as well as with PCs, in addition to iOS and Android devices running the company’s ProPanel app..

The $450 Pro24.z also sports a 2.4-inch color touchscreen but comes with its own charging cradle and provides control plus two-way feedback when used with the $450 ProLink.z central processor. (Like the Pro24.r, the Pro24.z can be used as a standalone remote, as well.) Wizard-based programming software is said to make it simple and straightforward to program either system, which means that labor costs should be lower than the fees for charging other, more extensive remote control systems.

Coming later this year is the iPro.8 “companion controller” for use with systems based on either of the two central processors but which are normally controlled by smartphone or tablet apps. The iPro.8 allows users in the room who don’t have ready access to a smartphone/tablet to still be able to operate the system. The iPro.8 will have an MSRP of $149.

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 09, 2012 0 comments
StealthCoverArt is a subsidiary of invisible speaker manufacturer Stealth Acoustics. StealthCoverArt makes it possible to choose a frame that fits over your flat-panel TV and then pick from a large selection of Stealth’s artwork, provide your own photo to be printed, or commission an original painting to use as the image that fits inside the frame and hides the TV. When you’re ready to watch TV, the canvas rolls up inside the frame, revealing the flat-panel behind it. Stealth Acoustics’ Image Series includes two-way customizable on-wall loudspeakers with completely flat front radiating surfaces that can be covered by an “Image Wrap” laminated finishes designed to match the screen image used in the StealthCoverArt frame. Pricing varies depending on size, style, and choice of image.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 09, 2012 0 comments
For folks who don’t want to put extra holes in their walls when adding a soundbar to a flat-panel TV, SnapAV offers a $79.95 universal bracket that attaches the soundbar directly to the HDTV. Depending on the height of the table stand that comes with your TV, you may be able to use the same bracket to mount your soundbar to the TV even if you don’t plan on wall mounting the TV. Fake fireplace is optional.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 09, 2012 0 comments
Almost as popular as in-ear headphones were various mounts for tablets – well, specifically, iPads. Sanus was demonstrating a special under-cabinet tablet mount, while OmniMount showed off a prototype wall mount device that held the iPad snug against the wall using powerful magnets. iPort’s cable-free mounting and charging system called LaunchPort requires a special $149 AP.3 Sleeve for your iPad – but the benefit is that you can magnetically attach your iPad to either iPort’s BaseStation or WallStation and simultaneously charge the device without needing to plug in a sync/charge cable. The $199 BaseStation is an angled block which is designed to sit on a desk or recliner’s arm rest. The $199 WallStation is a relatively small and unobtrusive in-wall installed device that snugly holds the iPad against the wall – and, as does the BaseStation, inductively charges the iPad when on the wall.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 08, 2012 3 comments
Of all the cool stuff at CEDIA 2012, by far – for me, at least – the most impressive and most cool thing I saw/heard/experienced was the voice-controlled home automation add-in for a Control4 system from Houselogix, called voicepod, that will be available later this year. Any number of voicepod “pods” can be used to allow you to control a virtually unlimited number of functions that may be available in your particular Control4 system. A voicepod is a small, flat device that looks somewhat like an electric hot plate for a coffee cup. Built into each voicepod is a microphone and speaker that allows the system to talk back to you in order to confirm commands or ask for additional commands. In order to keep the voicepod from responding to random conversation in the room, communication with the system has to be woken up by saying, “Hello, voicepod,” after which a female voice asks you what you would like to do.

During the demonstration, Theodore Rosenberger, the President and Founder of Houselogix, turned lights on/off, raised/lowered Lutron wireless shades, selected preset angles and panned a security camera, and even programmed the system on-the-fly to respond with specific phrases. I’ve seen quite a number of voice-controlled devices and systems over the years, and this one from Houselogix is by far the most exciting I’ve come across. Even though it’s only in beta testing now, I’ve already begun begging Houselogix to let me get my hands on a voicepod or two to integrate into my Control4 system.

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 08, 2012 0 comments
MartinLogan’s updated Motif X is a triple-hybrid center channel speaker that combines cones, electrostatic, and folded motion drivers in one cabinet. The original Motif included a traditional one-inch neodymium soft-dome tweeter which is replaced in the Motif X by the company’s hot Folded Motion tweeter. Availability and pricing was not available.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 08, 2012 2 comments
Security and convenience are two big benefits of having a home automation system. Unfortunately, the various door, window, and motion sensors that are the “eyes and ears” of the system are often big and ugly. At Control4’s mega-booth, NYCE Control was introducing “the smallest Zigbee home automation devices in the world”. And these gizmos certainly are small. The $89 door/window open/close sensors shown on the left of the NYCE display pictured above are not much larger than a quarter. Coming in the very near future will be a garage door sensor ($89) and a special device NYCE calls an “asset protector”. Basically a small white square just like the larger of the two parts of the window sensor, the $89 Asset Protector can be discretely attached to just about anything. The sensor is designed to immediately signal if it senses a large amount of motion. NYCE says you can attach this to the back of an HDTV, for example, as an additional security device that can notify your Control4 system that major movement – as in, someone is trying to take the TV off the way – has been detected.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 08, 2012 0 comments
NuVo took some of the wraps off of the company’s new multizone wireless/wired digital audio distribution system that consists of two wireless/wired amplifiers (20 watts x 2 or 60 watts x 2), a three-zone rack-mountable component with three built-in stereo amps, an optional dedicated NuVo remote (similar in size and shape to an iPhone), iOS and Android control apps, and a special NuVo router. The NuVo router is only required for wireless installations, otherwise each of the zone amplifiers can be connected to your home LAN. The control app is beautifully designed, easy to use, and changing/linking zones is super intuitive. Pricing hasn’t been officially set yet, but product should be available beginning later this year. This is definitely one of the most impressive multizone wireless audio systems I’ve found so far at CEDIA.

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