Geoffrey Morrison

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 11, 2013 2 comments
Battlefield is back, though thanks to an endless supply of add-on packs, it doesn’t feel like it ever left. Right now you can play the upcoming BF4 for free, as part of an open beta. Is it worth checking out? What does the beta say about the new game? Will it be worth buying? I’ve been playing for many, many hours, so that should probably tell you the answer to at least one of those questions. The rest revealed after the jump.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 02, 2013 0 comments
Dominic Baker is the Audio Systems Business Director at Cambridge Audio. He was previously the Chief Acoustics Engineer at Focal JM Lab, and the Acoustic Development Engineer at Tannoy. This is a Song (ok, musical event) from his Soundtrack.
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments
The PSB M4U 2 and M4U 1 headphones are some of the best you can get. The M4U 2s even won our product of the year last year.

The same guy behind those headphones, Paul Barton, has designed some in-ear headphones, VISO HP20. Color me intrigued.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 04, 2013 0 comments
Aimin’ to take a beatin’
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Aug 18, 2013 0 comments
A sneak peek at the biggest tech story of the year.
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 28, 2008 0 comments
A few months ago I wrote an article on various technologies in development that promise to bring 3D into your home, sans funny glasses. They're all a ways off from home use, but that doesn't mean you can't get 3D into your home. Two recently released products allow you to enjoy 3D in your home, right now. Maybe.
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Feb 26, 2008 Published: Jan 26, 2008 0 comments
The greatest thing to happen to LCD, ever.

The coolest demo I saw at CEDIA 2007 was a demo I saw at CEDIA 2006. The original demo was at the Planar suite. Dolby now owns the company that was working with Planar, BrightSide Technologies, and the technology shown in these demos has a name—Dolby Vision. The short version is this: Using LEDs, you can dim specific areas of the backlight to go along with what is happening with the video. In other words, you can dim certain areas of the screen, while keeping other areas bright. In the simplest form, picture a split screen with black on one side and white on the other. Local dimming would allow the LEDs on the black side to be off and the LEDs on the white side to be lit. The result is a fantastic, legitimate contrast ratio, along with possible energy savings and a host of other potential benefits. But first, we have to understand the problem before we can talk about this solution.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 18, 2008 Published: Dec 18, 2007 0 comments
Three Ones in this five.

There are two questions you could—maybe should—be asking right now. The first, "Didn't y'all just review some PSB speakers a few months ago?" And two: "Aren't you the video editor?" Well, yes. That either question should come to mind should say something about these speakers.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 17, 2007 0 comments
Part V: Software and do-dahs.

With the SilverPC up and running, (check the August and September issues for that), it comes time to talk about software. After all, you can't run a PC without software.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 15, 2007 0 comments
Like a Volvo; boxy, but good.

I have to say this TV surprised me, although, to be honest, it really shouldn't have. At first glance, there is nothing to set it apart from the innumerable other LCDs on the market. It has a narrow black bezel, it's thin, it's bright, has a remote, turns on; you know, all that stuff that LCDs usually do. Then I started throwing test material at it, and it started doing things that LCDs typically don't but JVC TVs typically do. And I mean that in a good way.

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