Jon Iverson

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Jon Iverson Posted: Nov 04, 2001 0 comments

Last week, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) reported that it has successfully developed what it describes as the world's first system for delivering 1.5 Gbps volume uncompressed HDTV video data in real time over the Internet. NTT says it will exhibit the Linux-based system during the International Broadcast Equipment Exhibition (InterBEE 2001) at the Nippon Convention Center from November 14 to 16, 2001.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Nov 07, 1999 0 comments

Here's proof that the early adopter plays a dangerous game: Less than a year after the official release of their hard-disk-based video recording system, <A HREF="http://www.replaytv.com">RePlay Networks</A> announced last week that it is releasing a major upgrade to its system. RePlay says the new device, named the RePlayTV 2020, is a personal video recorder with twice as much storage capacity as the company's current best-selling model, and&mdash;here's the part that tweaks early adopters&mdash;at no increase in price: 20 hours of storage for $699.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Apr 01, 2001 0 comments

HDTV has been broadcast via the Internet2 (see <A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com/shownews.cgi?529">previous story</A>), and several companies such as <A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com/shownews.cgi?687">Lucent</A>, Motorola, and <A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com/shownews.cgi?886">2NetFX</A> say they have been working on the technology. But <I><A HREF="http://www.internetweek.com/">InternetWeek</A></I> announced last week that they have conducted what they claim is the first ever high-definition television (HDTV) broadcast over the Internet.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Aug 06, 2000 0 comments

If it's true that a picture is worth a thousand words, then <A HREF="http://www.dvdpreview.tv"><I>DVD Preview</I></A> is likely the ultimate review "magazine" for new DVD releases. Arriving on newsstands in a cardboard package the size of a small magazine (think <I>The Reader's Digest</I>), <I>DVD Preview</I> bills itself as "a new kind of magazine coming to you on the very medium it reports on." To bring this point home, the magazine's website even has one of the recently minted ".tv" domain names (see <A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com/shownews.cgi?269">previous story</A>) instead of the ubiquitous ".com."

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Jon Iverson Posted: Oct 01, 2000 0 comments

Last November, <A HREF="http://www.flatdisplaysystems.philips.com">Philips</A>' flat-panel display division and <A HREF="http://www.rainbowdisplays.com">Rainbow Displays</A> announced their agreement to jointly develop large, "tiled" LCDs for a variety of next-generation consumer and business applications. Making good on that promise, last week the companies announced that they will showcase the industry's first 37.5-inch "tiled" flat-panel display at the Combined Exhibition of Advanced Technologies (CEATEC) Japan 2000, to be held October 3&ndash;7, 2000, in Tokyo.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jul 15, 2001 0 comments

Last week <A HREF="http://www.jvc.com">JVC</A> announced that the final touches have been applied and the D'Ahlia 61" D-ILA hologram HDTV rear projection television (official model number AV-61S902) has begun shipping to several retailers nationwide and will soon be available to consumers at a manufacturer's suggested retail price of $13k.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Nov 17, 2003 0 comments

Liquid Crystal on Silicon or LCOS technology is clearly hot in the HDTV market. <A HREF="http://www.microdisplay.com">MicroDisplay Corporation</A> announced last week that it his introduced a single panel 1920 x 1080 LCOS microdisplay with resolution of two million pixels. The company says the new chip is designed for front and rear projection televisions.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Feb 17, 2002 0 comments

One of the primary obstacles to getting high-bandwidth video such as HDTV to the home via cable is the limited signal-carrying capacity of what is termed "the last mile." Currently, cable modem users share a data pipe with TV channels that can carry about 30 megabits-per-second (mbps) into their homes.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Sep 19, 1999 0 comments

Planet Hollywood in New York hosted the world premiere of <I><A HREF="http://www.shootyoudown.com">underdogs</A></I> at the New York International Independent Film Video and Arts Festival this past weekend, but, in an effort to get the film from the launch party into the market, the writer-director has listed the rights to the romantic comedy on <A HREF="http://www.ebay.com">eBay</A>.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Dec 30, 2002 0 comments

In the ongoing battle between small-dish satellite and cable, the ability to broadcast local channels was a decided advantage for the wired approach. But the direct broadcast satellite (DBS) companies <A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com/shownews.cgi?582">successfully petitioned</A> the FCC for the right to carry local stations on their system; early in December a federal appeals court ruled that they must carry "<A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com/shownews.cgi?1171">all or none</A>" of those stations to comply.

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