Scott Wilkinson

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 14, 2011 0 comments

German high-end maker T+A introduces an A/V receiver with integrated Blu-ray player and massive new speaker as discussed by CEO Siegfried Amft.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jun 15, 2011 4 comments
I have often seen products with "Reference" in the name, such as "Professional Reference Speakers." Exactly what does that mean? Is it a standard or just hype to sell a product.

Terry Bavousett

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 13, 2012 0 comments
Billed as the "ultimate home-theater experience at CES," a ballroom in the Sands Convention Center was equipped with a Digital Projection Titan projector, Kaleidescape Blu-ray server, Stewart CineCurve screen with masking (Studiotek 130, 14 feet wide), Totem Acoustic speakers, ADA power amps, and D-Box motion actuators in luxurious recliners. Because I'm sensitive to motion sickness, I can't tolerate motion-actuator systems, but the rest of the audience seemed to really enjoy it with clips from Avatar, Monster House, Top Gun, and Fast Five. The picture quality was outstanding, as was the sound.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: May 27, 2009 0 comments

At the 2007 CEDIA Expo, I attended Meridian's press conference, during which the company unveiled its <A href="http://www.thef80.com">F80</A> table-top clock radio/CD/DVD player. I was a bit late, and the demo was already underway as I walked into the large concrete room with high ceilings. I clearly remember my first impression of what I heard—"Wow, that sounds great!" When I learned it was essentially a boombox, I was flabbergasted.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: May 26, 2008 17 comments

In the comments following my blog last week, Neil Richards asked a follow-up question that is the cause of much confusion. I wrote a bit about it in the comments attached to that blog, but I thought it deserved a more thorough treatment this week.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: May 19, 2008 17 comments

Here's a question I get a lot. This one's from Kevin Iole, a boxing and MMA columnist for Yahoo! Sports:

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Dec 28, 2011 9 comments
I've long heard the argument that you cannot tell the difference between 720p and 1080p displays unless you have a large screen and/or you sit very close to the TV. That sounds reasonable enough. But there's one thing I've never heard addressed as part of this debate—the issue of scaling. If most high-definition channels are broadcast at 1080i, aren't there scaling issues if you're viewing it on a 720p TV? Obviously, the real-world impact depends on the incoming signal and where the scaling occurs (TV, receiver, cable box). What do you think? Is this a noticeable issue?

Chris Keczkemethy

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 14, 2010 5 comments

Another CES has come and gone. This was my 15th, near as I can figure&#151;an odd coincidence, since, according to my pedometer, I walked nearly 15 miles during the 2010 geekfest.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Apr 27, 2011 15 comments
Vizio is introducing ultra-widescreen LCD TVs with an aspect ratio of 21:9. I believe their screen sizes will be 50, 58 and 71 inches. Can you provide the formula that reveals how large a 16:9 unaltered picture will be on such a screen? I’ve read elsewhere that a 50-inch ultrawide would produce an unaltered 46-inch 16:9 image, but I have no idea how 46 inches was arrived at.

Carl King

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Feb 17, 2012 3 comments
I have received an estimate for a basement home theater utilizing an Epson PowerLite Pro Cinema 6010 projector and a Dragonfly 2.35:1 screen. The installer recommends a Panamorph FVX200 anamorphic-lens system to convert movies to match the aspect ratio of the screen, but I question the value of this $3000 add-on to improve the home-theater experience.

Gregg Berkowitz

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