Geoffrey Morrison

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 16, 2006 0 comments
JVC was showing off a new 1080p projector. They claim a 10,000:1 contrast ratio without the use of an iris. They’re not sure on pricing yet, but they’re expecting sub-$7000 (as in $6,999.99 probably). Look for it around February.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 14, 2004 Published: Dec 15, 2004 0 comments
I've been a fan of Liquid Crystal on Silicon technology for some time now. It has the potential to take the better aspects of DLP and LCD and fuse them into a bright, high-resolution hybrid. Unfortunately, there are two main reasons why you don't see more LCOS products on the market. The first, and perhaps the most important, is the inability for anyone to efficiently mass-produce lots of working chips. At CES 2004, Intel announced that they were getting into the LCOS chip-making business. If anyone could make LCOS chips on the cheap, Intel could. Well, they couldn't. This is just fine for JVC, who has been making LCOS products for years under their D-ILA (Direct-drive Image Light Amplifier) moniker.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 30, 2005 0 comments
More TV than you can shake a really, really big stick at.

You know what? This is a big TV—deceptively big. The cabinet that surrounds the screen is so thin that, at first glance, the display doesn't appear that large. In our studio, it's sitting next to a 55-inch display that I'm reviewing for an upcoming issue, and it is positively dwarfed by the 70-inch JVC. Compared with a 50-inch plasma, which would be a fair comparison from a price standpoint, the HD-70G886 has nearly twice the overall screen area, and it has almost three times the area of a 42-inch display. Kinda makes you want to second-guess that plasma purchase, doesn't it?

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 17, 2007 28 comments
JVC showed off a new LCD panel that uses LEDs as it’s backlight source. With no model number, price, or potential availability, it isn’t much of a story. What is, is the prototype 2.35:1 aspect ratio RPTV they were showing in the back. They wouldn’t let us take pictures, though, so you’ll just have to imagine it. Hate those black bars on the top and bottom when you’re watching movies? This is your answer, a rear-projection TV with a really widescreen aspect ratio. I hope they make it as I imagine a lot of people would love to get one despite the fact that if you watch anything with less than 2.35:1 aspect ratio, you’ll have bars on the sides. Oh well.
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 30, 2006 Published: Nov 13, 2006 0 comments
60? Who needs 60?

As I've mentioned in the past, one of my least favorite artifacts in the video world is the motion blur that flat-panel LCDs exhibit. Not everyone is as allergic to this as I am, and that's fine. I tend not to be bothered by DLP rainbows; some are. So, we all have our things.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 15, 2007 0 comments
Like a Volvo; boxy, but good.

I have to say this TV surprised me, although, to be honest, it really shouldn't have. At first glance, there is nothing to set it apart from the innumerable other LCDs on the market. It has a narrow black bezel, it's thin, it's bright, has a remote, turns on; you know, all that stuff that LCDs usually do. Then I started throwing test material at it, and it started doing things that LCDs typically don't but JVC TVs typically do. And I mean that in a good way.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 08, 2011 0 comments

I'm a big fan of the Kindle Fire. It's the iPad's equal in every meaningful measure, plus it sports a more convenient form factor. Check out my review and this week's iPad/tablet face off.

But there's one thing I won't use it for: reading. Chances are, you won't want to either. So if you're thinking about getting one to use as an eReader, allow me a few words to talk you out of it.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Apr 28, 2006 3 comments
While the flood last week wasn’t nearly as bad as the one in October, we decided to do what we should have done that time: The carpets in our testing lab were ripped out, and the floor painted a lovely shade of gray. So the lab looks a whole lot better, and there isn’t the worry about mold and such. The downside, all the computers, test equipment, phone lines, Ethernet lines, and the myriad of other cables that connected gear to gear and gear to stuff, all still need to be run and plugged back in. The bottom picture is our temporary storage (as in, the listening room). Despite the mess, that was only half the amount of stuff in the lab. Spring cleaning indeed.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 28, 2005 Published: Sep 28, 2005 0 comments
It's no secret that, if you have a new projection display (front or rear), you'll eventually need to replace its light source. Take one look at them, and you'll see that these aren't your ordinary 100-watt bulbs—that, and the fact that these light sources cost hundreds of dollars each.
Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 15, 2006 0 comments
Planar showed off a prototype LCD panel that is the coolest thing I’ve seen so far at the show. It’s a normal LCD panel with 800 individual LED backlights that are on an active matrix back plane. What that means is that each LED is individually addressable depending on the video signal. Want a section of the screen to be dark? Dim the backlight in that area. The result is a fantastic legitimate contrast ratio, and actual blacks (cause the light is off). The picture above is just what the backlight is doing with the LCD “off.” It’s at least a year away from a real product, but it looks amazing. More on this in the future.

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