CEDIA 2013

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John Sciacca Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments
In-wall or in-ceiling speakers require there to be a minimum depth to mount into, but if you have a narrow cavity you can be out-of-luck. Or worse, out-of-luck AND with a big hole in your wall or ceiling. Fortunately, Revel has just the speaker, the new low-profile version of its 2-series in-wall/in-ceiling speaker. Designed to fit in a depts. Of only 2.8-inches these speakers will fit where others won’t. Fortunately, you won’t be skimping on sound just because you are going shallow, and you can choose between a 6 ½-inch or 8-inch woofers. Both models feature high-quality drivers including aluminum cone woofers and 1-inch aluminum-dome tweeters. They include the popular micro-bezel design and use multiple neodymium magnets to securely hold the grills in place.
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Kris Deering Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments
Magico’s new QSub subwoofer features dual 18” custom drivers and a 4,000 watt digital amp. At the remarkably low price of $36,000 I was considering buying a pair on the spot, but the wife shot me down. While these will displace a large portion of your bank account they’ll also displace a massive amount of air in your room with their deep extension.
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John Sciacca Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments
Control4 debuted several new additions to the audio/video distribution portion of the company’s well-regarded automation system. Principally was the new 8x8 HDMI matrix switch with built-in HDBaseT technology for sending uncompressed 1080p video and high-resolution, multi-channel audio up to 300-feet over a single Category rated cable. The system can also transmit Ethernet, IR and serial commands over a single cable, making it a perfect application for a retrofit. The new 8x8 matrix features 8 HDMI inputs, 8 stereo analog audio outputs, 8 HDBaseT RJ45 connections, 2 HDMI outputs for local connection, and 8 Ethernet inputs for each zone.
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Brent Butterworth Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments

Sonus Faber's trademark gorgeous craftsmanship and design were in evidence at the CEDIA Expo, where the company showed its new Olympica series speakers. Besides the fact that they were arguably the best-looking new speakers at the show, they're notable for two reasons. First, they're the first Sonus Faber speakers in which all the drivers were designed by the company. Second, they have a unique asymmetrical design with one of the coolest bass ports ever created.

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Al Griffin Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments
Digital Projection showcased its two newest DLP projectors at CEDIA, the updated single-chip M-Vision Cine LED1000 ($12,995) and the 3-chip Titan 1080P LED 3D ($80,000). And when I say showcase, I mean showcase: Both PJs were projecting images on a huge 165-inch screen that made you feel as if you were sitting in a real cinema.
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments
The PSB M4U 2 and M4U 1 headphones are some of the best you can get. The M4U 2s even won our product of the year last year.

The same guy behind those headphones, Paul Barton, has designed some in-ear headphones, VISO HP20. Color me intrigued.

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Bob Ankosko Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments
When it comes to audio system design, the importance of room acoustics is overlooked all too often. You can put thousands of dollars worth of speakers and electronics in a room with bad acoustics and it’s going to sound like…well, crap. “It’s not about creating an acoustically perfect environment, it’s about getting the right amount of acoustic treatment in the room,” said Primacoustic’s James Wright in an impromptu interview at CEDIA 2013. “You want to get the right amount of absorption into the space, which means treating 20-25 percent of the room.”
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments
NextGen’s Bluetooth-IR Extender was already a pretty cool device. It’s a small cone-like device that translates AV system commands from Android-based smartphones and tablets into IR using Bluetooth communication between the Extender and the Android device. After the IR Extender receives a command, it translates it into IR before blasting it out to your components from the base unit or via IR flashers. Neat idea, right?
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John Sciacca Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments
You very rarely see a manufacturer directly comparing one of their products to another manufacturer’s model. This year, Sonance wanted to prove that its new Visual Performance series of loudspeakers are the real deal and that they aren’t afraid of direct comparisons to any competitor. To prove their mettle, Sonance built a wall in their high-performance audio room and directly compared the new VP66 speaker against similarly priced models from Bowers & Wilkins (CWM663) and Revel (W563).
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Kris Deering Posted: Sep 28, 2013 0 comments
Cambridge Audio showed their Azur 752BD Blu-ray player that garnished our Top Pick earlier this year. Recently Cambridge Audio released a firmware update that enables full DSD file playback from an attached hard drive, memory stick or NAS. The firmware update is available from their website for the amazing price of free.
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Fred Manteghian Posted: Sep 27, 2013 1 comments
How much bandwidth is enough for the upcoming HDMI 2.0 standard? Well, if all you want to do is watch what you’re watching today, your current cable will work. Even if you want to watch 4K material, the standard developing HDMI Forum says you don't have to get new cable provided your cable meets the latest HDMI 1.4 spec. Step in Noel Lee of Monster Cable who is worried about future requirements for 8K and beyond. Monster announced their new cable will be capable of 31.5 Gbps, well over the 18 Gbps the HDMI forum says is required for 60 fps, 4K material. Nothing available yet, just the promise, but I’d believe the head Monster. Or else!
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Bob Ankosko Posted: Sep 27, 2013 0 comments
Walk into MartinLogan’s demo room at CEDIA 2013 and you walk into the past—specifically, the ‘60s, maybe early ‘70s. All-too-familiar glowing psychedelic posters line blacklight-lit walls accented by lava lamps and glowing tubes. Music blaring. It could be 1967, if not for the lack of a particular aroma and the 7.4-channel sound system. It was quad on steroids: Seven ElectroMotion ESL hybrid electrostats powered by five PrimaLuna DiaLogue tube amplifiers and four BalancedForce subwoofers, each with its own 850-watt amp, anchoring the corners of the room. The demo I walked in on wasn’t music of the ‘60s or ‘70s but a 5.1-channel mix of the Dire Staits ’80s anthem, “Money For Nothing.” The slow build and swell that introduces Mark Knopfler’s electronically processed guitar was like you’ve never heard before…If only I had more time to stick around and maybe listen to a little Pink Floyd.
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Brent Butterworth Posted: Sep 27, 2013 0 comments

I've been digging BG Radia's big floorstanding ribbon speakers since way back when S&V's Al Griffin and I were running Home Theater magazine. (That's before anyone had ever heard of MP3.) But the company hadn't done any new tower speakers for years -- until the new FS-880, which the company demoed at the CEDIA Expo in Denver.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 27, 2013 0 comments
Yamaha's YSP-1400 BL soundbar ($450) has eight little drivers behind that metal grille. They are designed to attain 5.1-channel status by beaming sound all over the place and bouncing it off walls. Take a look at those fat cylindrical feet. Those are the subwoofer drivers. There's Bluetooth, of course, and control apps for iOS and Android. A second new Yamaha soundbar is the YAS-152BL ($350) which is said to produce virtual 7.1-channel surround and also has built-in subs, this time firing out of the bottom surface. This bar's apps can be used to fine-tune the sound in addition to the usual volume and other adjustments. Both products have Dolby Digital and DTS decoding and (no surprise at these price points) no HDMI or lossless surround decoding. Both shipping next month.
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Fred Manteghian Posted: Sep 27, 2013 4 comments
The CX-A5000 is the new crowning jewel of the Aventage series introduced by Yamaha a few years ago. The 11 channels (not even counting the subs here folks) pre-pro uses Yamaha’s proprietary YPAO room correction software, four distinct zones and more ins and outs than the revolving doors in Washington D.C. The extra channels are a Yamaha trademark, you know the old, you bring a knife, I’ll bring a gun chestnut. But they are used to create front and rear “presence” channels which, if your room and budget allow, could make your movie experience all that much more intense.

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