TECH2

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 23, 2012 0 comments

I use my iPod to deal with crowds. If you’re like me, sometimes you just like cranking up some tunes to push the world out to more acceptable distance. This is especially true trying to shop during the holiday season.

So for the always-hectic Black Friday weekend, I figured I’d put together a few songs that are, shall we say, not sticky-sweet holiday shopping tunes. Drown out that Bing, Nat, and Perry, and power through the season with these.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: May 11, 2012 0 comments

I am not naive enough to think that the gaming industry's primary desire is anything other than to make money. As an industry, they're really good at it, making more than the movie and music industries combined.

The past year has seen an explosion of "Free to Play" (F2P) games that are, well, free to play. Lately, storied titles like Tribes have been reborn in this model. More titles in development aim directly at this new pricing strategy.

But is it good for games, and more importantly, is it good for gamers?

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 21, 2011 0 comments

It began, as so many things do, with Star Trek. Premiering just days after my 9th birthday, Star Trek: The Next Generation instilled unto me to many of the core principles I still hold dear: people working together can solve anything; when in doubt, scan; and, of course, bald dudes rule.

It was the technology that really wowed my young mind: the ship, the transporters, the replicators, and especially the tricorders all were added to my permanent Christmas list. Sadly, none of those yet exist (damn you, science!), but the P.A.D.D., barely more than set dressing, is perhaps the first Star Tech that you can actually buy.

And by any measure, that makes tablets fracking cool.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 05, 2012 0 comments

It started with Guild Wars 2: Random crashes, seemingly unconnected. Then it spread to other games. After a few hours with Black Mesa, a crash to the desktop. Occasionally, the dreaded BSOD (Blue Screen of Death).

No amount of driver updates fixed the issue. On the GW 2 tech forums the problem seemed widespread. When an Arena Net employee would bother to respond to one of the many threads about the same issue, they always just said, "Check your RAM."

Yeah, right. In 20 years of fixing and building computers, not once had I ever had a problem with RAM.

So what could it be?

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Feb 17, 2012 0 comments

Ford has built a mobile recording studio into a 2012 Focus with the help of legendary producer Don Was, engineer Krish Sharma, and car customizer “Mad” Mike Martin.

At the LA unveiling, I got to see the studio in action: recording a band and playing back the mix. As an added bonus I got to talk to Was and Sharma about how dynamic range compression/limiting is ruining modern music.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Aug 02, 2011 0 comments

In the late 1990s, a product manager from Zenith brought me the company's first HDTV set for review. After an afternoon spent checking out the TV - an engineering marvel for its time - I told him how impressed I was with it. "Yeah, we'd sell a ton of them if it said 'Sony' on the front," he wisecracked.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 21, 2013 0 comments

The town of Baker sits like a wart on the side of the I-15, somewhere in the desolation between Los Angeles and Las Vegas. A bizarre bastion of fast-food consumerism and price-gouged gasoline, it exists only as a way station for those optimistically heading to the City of Sin, or disillusioned, returning to the City of Angles.

Most years, it's my one and only stop, a quick tank top-off before the final push. This year, it's my third. One of the stops was a nap. I am not well.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: May 02, 2012 0 comments

The ability of a display to upconvert standard definition content (like a DVD, or many cable/satellite channels) was once a key component of its overall performance.

But now, most TVs do a reasonable job, and more important, I don’t think most people actually have any SD content.

Should we bother to continue testing it?

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 23, 2011 0 comments

I don't understand some people. Ok, a lot of people. Internet people, mostly. The type of people with the need to proselytize their views about meaningless crap.

You know, like what I do. Only, not paid.

These malcontents have a passion for posting vitriol wherever their sensibilities about good and bad companies/products/technologies are impugned.

To which I say, WTF?

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jun 07, 2013 0 comments

I've been travelling a bunch this year, with two big trips to Europe and China. Like my 10 Tips to the Travelling Techy last year, I brought along a bunch of gear, some good, some bad, some invaluable. I guess you could call this 10 Tips to the Travelling Techy 2, except it's eight.

So if you're planning any trips this summer, check out this list of some tech gear to bring.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Jul 25, 2012 0 comments

They’re still at it. A recent issue of Stereophile featured a sidebar on “13 Products Julian Hirsch Got Right” — implying, of course, that Hirsch got most products wrong. Poke around audio websites and you’ll probably see his name mentioned, often with scorn. But the man retired as technical editor of Stereo Review (Sound+Vision’s forebear) way back in 1998, and passed away five years later. What did he say so long ago that continues to attract attacks?

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 18, 2011 0 comments

 

I'll be honest, I can think of few things less sexy to review than an antenna. This isn't because they're not useful, it's just without a lot of specialized equipment, there isn't much I can say about them.

I live in The Valley, with a direct line of sight to the HDTV transmitters that cover all of Los Angeles. On the clear day each year, I can see Mt. Wilson from my front door. TV reception is so good, I could stick my finger in a TV's antenna input and my dome could probably pull in a signal. Picture that for a second.

But The Leaf by Mohu is actually kinda cool, and looks very different from any antenna I've seen.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Jul 06, 2011 0 comments

While on a swing through Vancouver this week to check out the vintage audio scene, I stopped by to say hi to the guys at Vancouver Audio Speaker Clinic, an old-school speaker repair shop of the type I haven’t seen since I was a kid in the 1970s trying to resurrect the shredded speakers from my

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Oct 31, 2012 0 comments

At the Rocky Mountain Audio Fest in Denver earlier this month, I must have visited at least 100 demo rooms and booths. But DEQX impressed me more than any of the scores of headphones, speakers, and electronics I heard.

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Michael Berk Posted: Apr 16, 2012 0 comments

Today we take a look at some more fallout from the personal listening explosion, with an assist from the vinyl revival and the continuing rise of electronic music. Visit a headphone retailer these days, you'll find a lot of models meant, supposedly, for the professional DJ - or at least meant to make the casual listener look like they might be the sort of person who spends a lot of time at the decks.

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