TECH2

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Brent Butterworth Posted: May 31, 2013 0 comments

IMAX already enjoys a rep as more or less the ultimate cinematic experience. Now it wants to be known for the ultimate home theater experience. The company's new Private Theatre program creates a 4K 3D theater in your home, with 7.1 sound and a wall-to-wall, floor-to-ceiling screen.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Jul 18, 2012 0 comments

Whenever I drive the stretch of I-5 between Seattle and Vancouver, BC, I feel like Luke Skywalker sensing a powerful presence nearby. That’s because I know that just north of Seattle lives one of the true legends of the audio industry: Bob Carver, founder of Phase Linear, Carver Corporation, and Sunfire, and the pioneer of numerous audio technologies during his four-plus decades in the industry.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Nov 14, 2011 0 comments

Hanging out at the recent Rocky Mountain Audio Fest, I listened in on a conversation that S+V writer Mike Trei was having with an audio manufacturer who's getting into the headphone biz.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 26, 2012 0 comments

Most modern TVs, tablets, and laptops have glossy screens. While these have benefits as far as image quality goes, they’re not great in bright environments. Hard reflections can make the actual content on the screens hard to see.

NuShield makes special removable films that aim to combat this problem.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Apr 09, 2012 0 comments

For most people, running a 1-meter HDMI cable to their TV is the only connection they need to make to experience a glorious 1080p picture. But mount that TV on a wall, or decide to go with projection, and you have a problem: the wires. Sure you can run HDMI cables through your walls or ceiling (or down to your basement), but sometimes that's just not easy - or possible.

As Daniel Kumin found in his recent "Something in the Air" article, sending HD signals wirelessly is not only possible, it's now practical, and even affordable.

New on the scene is DVDO's Air, one of the more interesting-looking products in this category. Curious how well it stacks up? How convenient. Me too.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Oct 14, 2011 0 comments

Like every other Sound+Vision writer, I’ve seen a lot of 3D TV. But I never saw so much 3D TV as I did last night, when I walked into South, Los Angeles’ first 3D sports bar. Everywhere I looked, I could see a Vizio flat-panel TV showing 3D programming—sports mostly, of course, but also games and a couple of Blu-ray Discs.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Aug 15, 2013 0 comments

Organic Light-Emitting Diode televisions have been perpetually on the horizon for what seems like forever. I remember first writing about the technology when I was at Home Theater magazine, which was multiple jobs ago (and, by the transitive properties, my current one as well).

Like any new technology, these TVs are expensive, but will they be worth it?

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 20, 2012 0 comments

It’s rare for any company to discuss a health problem associated with their industry. This makes V-MODA’s new line of Fader earplugs a welcome curiosity.

They claim to be “designed and tuned by professional DJs, producers and doctors.” As in, not the hard high-end cut offered by foam earplugs.

Ok, sounds like something I’d like, but where to test them. . .

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Jul 19, 2011 0 comments

Last year, an audio dealer named Gordon Sauck called to get my permission to use a 1997 article of mine on his website. As I chatted with him, I realized there was a huge emerging trend to which I and most of the other guys who write about audio have been largely oblivious.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 27, 2012 0 comments

If the weather, calendar, and bevy of "PLEASEGIVEMEANOSCAR" movies didn't give it away, surely the title of this article does: 2012 is pretty much history.

In the pages of Sound+Vision (both the digital and analog variety), we've covered some interesting trends, products, news, and more.

So here are some highlights and lowlights, some contrast and brightness, some tweeters and some woofers, some increasingly lame metaphors, some... well, you get the point.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Apr 18, 2012 0 comments

This week may be the most eventful in history for surround-sound geeks. Yesterday, one of the biggest names in surround sound — DTS — announced it had acquired another of the biggest names in surround sound, SRS.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Sep 13, 2011 0 comments

To me, the most exciting and revolutionary home theater product at the CEDIA Expo wasn't a new speaker or projector or HDMI-over-CAT5 solution.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Apr 16, 2013 0 comments

I love my car. My car is old. Eleven years old this week, actually. When I bought it, in-dash cassette players were on their way out, and CD players were all but standard. Mine even had the upgraded "Audiophile" system, which had an in-dash 6-disc changer.

The stupidity of a in-dash CD changer aside, the one thing my car didn't have was any ability to add an external source. None. So imagine my annoyance, my near-decade-long annoyance at not being able to play my iPod in my car.

Well with one fell swoop, not only can I play my iPod, I can voice dial, hands free talk, stream music from my phone, navigate via GPS, and do all the other fancy things people who buy new cars can do. I got (Asteroid) Smart.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jun 18, 2012 0 comments

I recently got back from three weeks camping/backpacking in South Africa. For anyone who knows me, my using those verbs in the same sentence as “I” will be rather shocking.

Only sporadically near power, and often on the go, I was, with some careful preparation (and ongoing trial and error), able to use my iPod, watch TV shows and videos, and take over 2,000 photos, all without tech incident.

So with the summer travel season upon us, follow these tips and don’t miss a photo, track, or clip.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 04, 2011 0 comments

One of the most popular - and in truth, most valid - ways of comparing two products is to, well, directly compare two products. A battle royale, two-enter-one-leaves style of head-to-head competition where it's clear which product is the victor.

Done correctly, direct A/B comparisons are by far the most accurate ways of determining product superiority.

The problem is, they're often not done correctly. Sometimes, they can't be done correctly. In those cases, the results couldn't be further from accurate.

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