TECH2

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 26, 2011 0 comments

If you've been following my progress integrating an HTPC into my theater, you'll recall my frustration with getting fluid and precise control.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jun 20, 2013 0 comments

I watch one sporting event each year (OK, two if you count the sportball game between the commercials of the "Superbowl"). This one event takes place in a tiny village in western France. An epic battle of men and machines, of endurance and stamina, of danger and skill, fought against weather, distance, and time.

I of course speak of le mythique, le légendaire, le grand Circuit de la Sarthe et les Vingt-Quatre Heures du Mans.

Or simply,

Le Mans

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Aug 01, 2012 0 comments

When pro audio technology invades home theaters, it’s usually in the form of a recording monitor repurposed for consumer use. Pro Audio Technology comes at it from another direction: It’s bringing P.A. system technology into the home.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Nov 23, 2011 0 comments

A few weeks ago I found myself mentioned in a rant by CNET's Steve Guttenberg. Steve thinks it's dumb for anyone but a product designer to measure the performance of audio gear. He mentioned me because I take the opposing view.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Jul 06, 2011 0 comments

We finally have a victor in the consumer electronics industry’s long-running race to the bottom: the Dayton B652. How much less expensive can a two-way speaker get than $34.50 per pair? That’s the price Parts Express currently demands for the B652.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 01, 2012 0 comments

Hot on the heels of Apple’s latest iPad (and lukewarm on the heels of Amazon’s new Kindle Fires), Google announced new Nexus tablets in unsurprising sizes and price points.

As I’ve said before, hardware is largely irrelevant to the tablet market. Greater resolution or processing speed doesn’t help you get more content to download.

To that end, Google announced new licensing deals to bring more content to Play — and I have a chart to prove it.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: May 04, 2012 0 comments

One of the most common requests I get by email, and in comments on reviews, is to share what picture settings I've used to achieve the best image.

To put it bluntly: no. This isn't because my settings are some big secret, it's because I honestly believe sharing them is a bad idea, and I'd be doing more harm than good.

And once I list the reasons why, you may even agree with me.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Oct 18, 2011 0 comments

While the image quality of video streaming services has been improving, audio has lagged behind. But it looks like it’s catching up.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 28, 2012 0 comments

Reverence. That is what I, and most gamers, feel towards Half-Life. Released in 1998, it was revolutionary. More importantly, it was fun.

Playing now, though, is nearly impossible. Not because of any technological limitations (it was ported to Steam), but because the 14-year-old graphics make you want to weep.

At least they have until now.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Feb 24, 2012 0 comments

Verizon and Redbox recently announced a partnership to launch a streaming/physical disc service. Yawn.

But I’ve been getting a lot of emails and questions about it recently, so maybe there’s something to it. Could it really be a contender? Could it really give Netflix serious competition?

I blew the suspense with the title, didn’t I? My bad.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Aug 04, 2011 0 comments

I recently took a bit of a road trip for my summer vacation. All told, it was about 1,000 miles, starting in rural New Hampshire (is there any other kind?), down through New York into rural-ish Pennsylvania, and back again.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 24, 2013 0 comments

The nerdworld exploded yesterday when news leaked that Disney had selected J.J. Abrams to direct the next Star Wars movie. J.J. Abrams is best known for the under-watched Alias, the over-watched Lost, and of course for resurrecting and rebooting the other great sci-fi franchise: Star Trek.

As one would expect from the most rabid fanbase in the world, hatred spewed forth.

But not from me. I say let him at it.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Sep 18, 2011 0 comments

Maybe back in the 1920s, when Sound + Vision was called Superheterodyne Journal, we might have reviewed some giant tube amplifier that put out 2 watts at full blast. But other than perhaps some forgotten device from audio's days of yore, this storied publication has never tested an amplifier so small, so weak, so limited in utility as the Qinpu Q-2.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: May 06, 2013 1 comments

This is one of the nerdier posts I've done, but since I'm unabashedly a nerd, and I hope many of you are too, I figured it would work.

You see, I love LEDs. I think they're fascinating in how they work, what they can do, and so on. As you'd expect, I'm slowly replacing the CFL bulbs in my house with LEDs.

The thing is, not all LED bulbs are equal, and one of the biggest drawbacks is that not all offer the "warmth" in color temperature most of us love in incandescents.  So I put a few different LEDs on my test bench, measuring them sort of how I measure TVs, to see how they do.

Curious? Well I was, hopefully you will be too.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Jul 04, 2012 0 comments

Back in the mid-1950s, there weren’t a whole lot of stereo recordings available. How, then, could an audio engineer evaluate the equipment he was designing? For Paul Klipsch, founder of Klipsch Speakers, the answer was to make his own recordings.

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