CUSTOM INSTALLATION HOW-TO

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John Sciacca Posted: May 25, 2010 0 comments

Kaleidescape and I go way back. This is the fifth time I’ve had one of its systems in for review, and I must say, the company’s products just keep getting better and better.

Al Griffin Posted: Feb 02, 2008 0 comments

One of the biggest news items to emerge from last year's Consumer Electronics Show was LG's announcement of a dual-format deck that could play both Blu-ray Discs and HD DVDs. We subsequently got our hands on that player, the BH100 Super Multi Blue, and we found it an intriguing but frustratingly incomplete solution.

Daniel Kumin Posted: Jul 02, 2013 1 comments

First, the obvious: The Astell&Kern AK100 is beautiful, both visually and in tactile terms, much the same way as the first iPod you ever saw was. Who cares what it is or what it does? You just want to hold it. And own it.

Ken C. Pohlmann Posted: Dec 18, 2002 0 comments
Photos by Tony Cordoza

Back in the Stone Age of Digital Audio (circa 1990), discerning audiophiles paid big bucks for elegant-looking CD players. Today the emphasis is on performance rather than looks. Most DVD players are visually boring, and their lack of heft hardly inspires confidence. Sometimes I yearn for the days when a player's quality could literally be weighed.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: May 09, 2011 0 comments

DEFINING A NEW PRODUCT CATEGORY

I'm struggling with this: What do you call these things? Digital Media Streamers? Digital Media Receivers? How about media extenders, media streamers, or digital media adapters? Maybe Internet Streaming Devices? If you abbreviate that last one, it sounds a bit sinister. "Dude, I got an ISD." Annnnnnnd, you're on a list somewhere.

Al Griffin Posted: Jul 29, 2004 0 comments
New technologies for time-shifting TV have been multiplying in recent years, making the VCR seem as old-fashioned as the Victrola. Most people know about TiVo and ReplayTV - hard-disk video recorders that seek out and store programs based on your viewing habits. But now there's also PC software like Snapstream's BeyondTV 3 that lets you capture shows on your computer hard drive.
David Ranada Posted: Feb 03, 2006 0 comments

Like swimmers in some Darwinian gene pool, DVD recorders are quickly mutating to fill every possible niche. Yet as they evolve, you can count on finding a core set of features in most decks - a TV tuner, a VCR-style timer, and a handful of recording "modes" that let you trade picture quality for playback time.

John Sciacca Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Writing for Sound & Vision has taken me to such exotic locales as an aircraft carrier at sea and George Lucas's Skywalker Ranch.

Ken C. Pohlmann Posted: Jul 09, 2001 0 comments

Tell me if any of this sounds familiar: You want to buy a DVD-Video player to impress your friends with your techo-hipness (and besides, you're tired of watching fuzzy VHS rentals). You have a digital surround receiver, so the player doesn't need a Dolby Digital or DTS decoder.

John Sciacca Posted: Aug 23, 2012 0 comments

While there are multiple ways to get TV programming — broadcast, cable, satellite, telco (Verizon FiOS/AT&T U-verse), or over the Internet — I’ve received mine via cable for as long as I’ve been a member of the TV-consuming public.

Al Griffin Posted: Oct 02, 2008 0 comments
Stan Horaczek Posted: Nov 04, 2010 0 comments

When Logitech's Revue showed up at my door, I had already spent some time with it on a few different press events. But, after having it nestled under my HDTV for a few days, I really started to get a feel to how it actually figures into the media-consumption process. Having already applied the first over-the-air update, it's safe to say that the Revue does exactly as promised, at least from a technical perspective. Before it can truly revolutionize the way we watch, however, it's going to need some help.

Setup

David Ranada Posted: May 27, 2004 0 comments

For a lot of reasons, a DVD recorder equipped with a hard-disk drive makes a lot of sense. Sharp's stylish DV-HR300, which contains a drive with an 80-gigabyte (GB) capacity, is a good example of the advantages of such an arrangement.

Ken C. Pohlmann Posted: Sep 05, 2005 0 comments

Last time I checked, there were five different recordable-DVD disc types - a potential compatibility catastrophe. Wouldn't it be great if someone invented a player that could play all kinds of DVDs? Even better, what if it was also a recorder?

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