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HOME MOVIE THEATERS

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Dan Daley Posted: Aug 28, 2007 Published: Aug 29, 2007 0 comments
And you thought home theater was just for the home.
Krissy Rushing Posted: Aug 28, 2007 Published: Aug 29, 2007 1 comments

<I>How to fit 10 seats in a small room and still get amazing sound.</I>

Tony Reimer Posted: Aug 28, 2007 1 comments

Although it took a total of two years and six months of hard work, an equity line is what really helped me finish my theater. Home Theater magazine, Audio Video Interiors, and the Internet were my main sources of information. The room's dimensions are 13.5 by 19 by 8.33 feet, with a closet in the rear that houses the component rack. I gutted the room to the studs, even the ceiling, and installed a dedicated power circuit for audio, video, and lighting. I ran all the wiring for low voltage in the crawl space and for high voltage in the attic. Some crossing was unavoidable, but, at 90-degree angles, I've had no problems. To begin color selection, I started with the ceiling. I simulated the night sky with Ralph Lauren flat paint in magistrate black. I took a paint chip with me to the garment district in L.A. and found curtain fabric. With those colors to work with, I picked out the wall and trim paint and the carpet to match. I already had the black leather furniture.

Dave Curlee Posted: Aug 28, 2007 0 comments

<B>The Beginning</B>
<br>
I am an avid do-it-yourselfer, thanks to my father. We did everything around our home together, from electrical to plumbing to construction. I purchased my first home theater receiver in college back in 1989. It was a Kenwood with big and loud Cerwin Vega speakers. For the next several years, I pieced together this system as best I could with what money I had.

Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Aug 28, 2007 0 comments

<I>Driven by his passion for movies, this homeowner truly went the distance to create his ideal home theater.</I>

Glenn Mosby Posted: Aug 28, 2007 0 comments

Having lived in our home since 1979, we are the third owners of this tiny 750-square-foot, 1.5 story, 1943 frame bungalow. In 1998 we decided on some major interior and exterior modifications, which I designed and we had done. The exterior changes gave the house a fresh, neomodern look without spoiling the home's original character lines, allowing it to still fit in with our neighborhood. The interior changes opened up our main floor plan. I have since caught the carpentry bug and now design and do my own work.

Tom J. Slager, Homeowner Posted: Aug 28, 2007 1 comments

After several years of reading about the home theater experience, my family and I finally decided to convert some unused basement space into our own dedicated theater. Since I enjoy doing home-improvement projects, I chose to do most of the construction myself and to hire a reliable company to provide and integrate the audio/video components. I had constructed a small, built-in entertainment center a few years before in our home in Cincinnati, Ohio, but had never done a project as large as this.

Chris LeGrange Posted: Aug 28, 2007 0 comments

<I>19 designers, 19 rooms, 1 installer. </I>

Ford Gunter Posted: Aug 28, 2007 2 comments

<I>How one couple pulled off a home theater that is completely independent from the house in which it resides. </I>

Kirk Bluth, Homeowner Posted: Aug 28, 2007 2 comments

My interest in home theaters stems from my father. Like anyone brought up by a good father, I wish to be like him and take interest in things that he finds interesting. One hobby of his is audio/video stuff. Several years ago, he turned a little-used living room in the basement of his home into a home theater. He had professional installers do the work, and I was amazed at the results: a drop-down tensioned screen, an HDTV projector, and top-quality picture and sound. I wanted to have a home theater, too. In the middle of my Air Force service at Hill AFB, Utah, my family and I decided to build a home. I had plans to build a dedicated home theater under the garage. Financial issues, including medical-school loans, a family of seven to feed, and limited military income caused these plans to end up on the back burner. Two years later, I finished my military obligation, and we moved to rural Webster, South Dakota. We built a new home, and this time I was determined to make the home theater happen! We designed our own home, and the basement home theater fit right into the plans. I had the contractor lower the foundation 4 feet to give the room some depth. I had read that square rooms are poor choices for home theaters, but, with a degree of oppositional defiance, I set out to make a square 25-by-25-foot home theater.

Krissy Rushing Posted: Aug 22, 2007 1 comments

<I>Harman engineer Dr. Floyd Toole's own home theater is surprisingly achievable. That's because he's a regular guy like you.</I>

Bob Yazel, Homeowner Posted: Aug 22, 2007 0 comments

Our home theater started out as an unfinished basement room with dimensions of 14 by 18 by 9 feet. The room is rectangular, with three doors and no windows. Audio problems are inherently more difficult to solve than video problems. Fortunately, the room dimensions are friendly to acoustic resonances. Since the theater would be right under the great room of the house, the main goal was to decouple the theater from the rest of the house as best as possible.

Rebecca Day Posted: Aug 22, 2007 0 comments

<I>A wild theater with a sonic edge shows you how to balance acoustics, design, and living space.</I>

Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Aug 22, 2007 1 comments

<I>Creative solutions for a theater's, er, shortcomings.</I>

Mark Elson Posted: Aug 22, 2007 1 comments

Integrating 21st-century home electronics into the architecture of a newly built 18th-century-style Italian villa would, at first glance, appear impossible. After all, about the only thing technological in the 1700s was the nutcracker. Add to this the advanced needs of a tech-savvy young couple who are inspired by the past but make their careers within the computer and video-gaming fields, and you have seemingly irresolvable conflicts. This property's sheer size further magnified the task at hand. It's a three-level, 12,000-square-foot home situated on 2.3 acres in the hills of Southern California. Enter Sound Solutions of Culver City, California, premier systems integrators with a 29-year history and a reception area full of national awards, including&nbsp; Crestron's first annual Biggest, Baddest Home Award and the CEA Mark of Excellence Award, both given for this project.

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