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LCD TV REVIEWS

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Shane Buettner Posted: Sep 12, 2006 0 comments
  • $4,299
  • 46" LCD
  • 1920x1080
  • Key Connections: Dual HDMI and component inputs, RGB/PC on 15-pin DSUB
Features We Like: Full 1080p, accepts native1080p signals, selectable color gamuts, Sony's latest and greatest (DRC version) 2.5 video processing, ambient light sensor adjusts panel light output to match room light, OTA HD tuner, built-in speakers, optional colored bezels, and more!
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Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Sep 12, 2006 0 comments
The dark side is stronger.

As we round the corner toward 2007, the big names in LCD are bringing their next-generation models to market. While some models experiment with new technologies designed to improve LCD performance, all seem to have one thing in common: They cost a lot less than their 2005 predecessors. It's hard to believe that, this time last year, I was reviewing 32-inch HDTVs and HD monitors priced at around $3,500. As I examined the new Samsung 32-inch LN-S3251D, which has a wee-little asking price of $1,800, I couldn't help but wonder which, if any, corners Samsung cut to help that price fall so far and so fast.

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Shane Buettner Posted: Sep 12, 2006 0 comments
  • $2,300
  • 37" LCD
  • 1366x768
  • Key Connections: Two HDMI inputs, two component video inputs
Features We Like: Excellent connectivity with dual HDMI and component inputs, Over the-Air HD tuner, ambient light sensor adjusts image brightness to match room light, backlit remote
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Aug 14, 2006 0 comments
What the big bucks get you.

Per screen inch, this is the most expensive TV we've reviewed in years. The early 50-inch plasmas were certainly more expensive (and obviously smaller), but, in the era of higher yields and vicious competition, it's rare to see any company come out with a model that unabashedly eschews the price wars. An obvious comparison would be one of a Ferrari, and Sharp would indeed love that comparison. For the extra money, does this 57-inch offer greater performance compared with the Camrys of the LCD world? The better question would be, does it offer enough better performance to justify its substantial premium?

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Aug 13, 2006 0 comments

Two years ago you would have paid over $10,000 for a large, widescreen flat panel LCD display. And "large" might well have meant 32" diagonal. The picture would have been bright and crisp, but a pale reflection of the overall image quality available from still-plentiful CRT direct view sets. Its resolution would have been 1280x720, tops, or one of those bizarre resolutions like 1365x768 that are still featured in many flat panels.

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Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Jun 15, 2006 0 comments
With prices falling and interest rising, it must be time to do a Face Off.

LCD is coming into its own as a home theater technology, priming itself to challenge plasma and DLP in the larger screen sizes. Until recently, technology and size limitations have caused us to approach LCD as a second-room technology, but you can't ignore the roar of the masses, who are buying more LCD TVs than ever before, especially in the 32- to 42-inch screen sizes.

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Peter Putman Posted: Jun 08, 2006 0 comments

<UL CLASS="square">

<LI>Price: $2099</LI>
<LI>Technology: LCD</LI>
<LI>Resolution: 1366x768</LI>
<LI>Size: 40"</LI>
<LI>Inputs: One HDMI, two component, one each composite and S-Video, one RGB on 15-pin DSUB </LI>
<LI>Feature Highlights: Over-The-Air and cable HD tuners, Picture-In-Picture, built-in DVD player, built-in speakers, tabletop stand.</LI>

Filed under
Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jun 07, 2006 0 comments

There's a revolution happening in high-definition televisions. Plasma and LCD flat panel displays are on the verge of dominating the market. CRTs still sell in higher numbers, but primarily in smaller and cheaper models. Once you get much over $1000 and 30-inches diagonal, CRTs are dying off like flies.

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Posted: May 24, 2006 0 comments

<UL CLASS="square">
<LI>$9,995</LI>
<LI>Technology: LCD</LI>
<LI>Resolution: 1366x768</LI>
<LI>Size: 40"</LI>
<LI>Inputs: One HDMI, one non-HDCP compatible, four RGBHV/component, two each composite and S-video, one RGB on 15-Pin DSUB</LI>
<LI>Faroudja deinterlacing w/DCDi, separate video processor/switcher, dynamic black enhancement, attractive wood veneer back panel, tabletop stand</LI>
</UL>

SIM2 has proven over the first ten years of its existence that it's a company remarkably adept at keeping pace with the rapidly changing home theater display market. Starting in CRT front projection, this Italian company has rapidly assimilated into the digital display world with triumphs of both form and function, offering outstanding DLP front and rear projection TVs with gorgeous pictures and aesthetics to match. The wait for SIM2 to jump into the flat panel market ended with the introduction of the $10,000 HTL40 LINK.

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Chris Chiarella Posted: May 20, 2006 0 comments
Start clearing room on your desktop.

Video editor Geoffrey Morrison is a car guy. Me, I drive a Camry. It's 10 years old, and it does everything I need it to do. But I certainly appreciate the difference when I sit behind the wheel of, say, a BMW. That's kind of how I felt when I test drove Samsung's latest SyncMaster LCD monitor, the 244T.

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Adrienne Maxwell Posted: May 20, 2006 0 comments
A true HD monitor.

Some of you may think that I call the LVM-42w2 a "true HD monitor" because I've finally acquiesced to the HDTV conspiracy theorists who insist that only 1,920-by-1,080 displays like this one should be labeled HDTVs. Don't worry—I plan to support 1080i and 720p a bit longer.

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Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Mar 10, 2006 0 comments
It's all inside.

So you've saved up your pennies and are ready to buy a swanky new 32-inch LCD HDTV. You've picked out the perfect place on the wall to mount the TV; its streamlined aesthetic complements your room's clean lines and minimalist approach. Before you head to the local retailer, ask yourself one important question: Have you also picked out the perfect place to put all of those clunky boxes that feed signals to your flat-panel beauty?

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 23, 2006 0 comments
Good looking from almost any angle.

Sony is arguably the most powerful brand name in television. The Trinitron is the premiere picture-tube technology known to two or three generations of TV buyers. But what has Sony done for us lately? In front and rear projection, the company has mustered SXRD, a visually credible version of silicon-based liquid-crystal technology. Only in flat panels, the subject of this review, has Sony yet to earn a commanding role.

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Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Jan 31, 2006 Published: Jan 01, 2006 0 comments
The little TV that could.

You might be a little surprised to learn that this Maxent monitor has a 26-inch screen. Why would Home Theater devote precious space to a display with such a small screen size? Sure, there's the fact that it's an LCD, and flat panels are the thing consumers care about right now. But, hey, if that's all there is to it, why not start reviewing 20-inch computer monitors, too?

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Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Oct 15, 2005 Published: Oct 30, 2005 0 comments
Embrace the digital age.

The CEA recently conducted a study to figure out how many people will be affected when analog broadcasts are no more. (We're still taking bets as to whether or not that day will ever truly arrive.) Their research determined that about 12 percent of the 285 million TVs in the U.S. receive programming via an over-the-air signal, while 94.4 million TVs are connected to a cable box, satellite receiver, or both.

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