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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 10, 2006 1 comments

"The Cube" is the first stop in testing a B&O loudspeaker. At 12x12x13 meters it is the world's largest privately owned sound test room. It is not an anechoic chamber. Instead, B&O built a space large enough to use MLS measurements to a high degree of precision. MLS measures the speaker's response to an impulse. This result is then gated to eliminate the effect of the sound reflected off the walls. The reproduced and filtered impulse is then converted back to a frequency response (techies will recognize this as a Fourier transformation). The two walls of the chamber are damped, not to eliminate reflections but to speed up the time between impulses (a number of impulses are averaged for greater precision). The support structure shown here holds the loudspeaker (in the photo it's one of B&O's very tall, pencil-thin designs). The mike is visible in the distance. Measurements are made in 140 different directions.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 10, 2006 0 comments

The BeoSound 4 is an all-purpose CD, radio, SD card slot, and optional Digital Audio Broadcasting (European format) music system. The pyramid-shaped BeoLab 4 speakers are self-powered, with digital amplification. Approximately 8" high, B&O calls the BeoLab 4 a multi-purpose unit, suitable for a small stereo system, for a music system or computer, or as a surround sound speaker in an AV setup. It can be placed on a desk stand, floor stand, wall mounted, or hung from the ceiling.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 10, 2006 0 comments
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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 10, 2006 4 comments

If stepping off the plane into the Copenhagen airport is a little like stepping into the world's biggest IKEA store, then stepping out of the tiny airport in Karup, Denmark is a little like transporting to the farmlands of Nebraska. But my mission to the far west end of the Jutland peninsula, together with a number of other European and North American journalists, was not sightseeing, but information. Information about what Struer, Denmark manufacturer B&O is currently about, and how the activities in its several facilities are leading to interesting new products, and how those products are influenced by the thinking and research behind them.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 10, 2006 0 comments

Speakers for cordless phones, another B&O product category, must be tiny. Looks like it also might make an interesting tweeter, though probably not, as the frequency response of telephone drivers is band limited by design.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 21, 2006 0 comments

It all starts with the mother glass. That's the foundation for building an LCD panel. Everything else—the individual red, green, and blue elements of each pixel and the interconnects necessary to drive them—are grown on it.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 08, 2006 Published: Oct 09, 2006 0 comments

JVC announced a new 58" D-ILA model that checks in at just a bit over 10-inches deep.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 09, 2006 0 comments

The SED demo included this puppet performance (this is a direct shot of the live action, not a screen shot from the SED) so we coulde compare live vs Memorex.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 09, 2006 0 comments

Sharp dressed up its booth with some of the tallest Japanese ladies I've ever seen.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 08, 2006 Published: Oct 09, 2006 0 comments

Sharp showed off every size and model of its current line.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 08, 2006 Published: Oct 09, 2006 0 comments

Toshiba showed its first outboard HD DVD-ROM computer drive.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 09, 2006 1 comments

The Tokyo-based CEATEC, held each fall about this time, is sometimes referred to as Japan's CES. While the analogy doesn't fit when applied to finished goods (the show is far smaller in that respect than even the CEDIA Expo, much less CES), it certainly does apply if you include component parts. You can roam the eight or so exhibit halls and find all sorts of things, from cell phones to capacitors to integrated circuits. There was even a small, lonely booth off to one side with high-end audio goods on display. The exhibitor's there had obviously confused CEATEC with the annual Tokyo High-end Audio Show, scheduled for later this month.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 09, 2006 0 comments

Sharp is working on this Japanese-to-English and English-to-Japanese translation device. It translates both written and spoken language, though is still fairly rudimentary in its ability to handle complex communication. We're not quite up to Star Trek's universal translator yet, but you can see it coming.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 08, 2006 Published: Oct 09, 2006 0 comments

This single seater in the Pioneer booth is for those who can't fit a Mini in the garage. I'm not sure how it fits into consumer electronics. Perhaps it's the audiophile special—you can drive and still always be in the sweet spot.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 08, 2006 Published: Oct 09, 2006 0 comments

Hitachi's Premier designs in Japan are part of the Wooo line. Wooo Hooo!

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