CES 2011

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
Watch out, Google TV. Fanhattan is a new service scheduled to launch in early 2011 that uses a very simple and easy-to-use UI to let you surf the world of video entertainment. It not only makes it easy to find the TV shows and movies you want to watch – it also lists the various services that provide that content and the prices charged (in the case of movies, for instance). Fanhattan will also provide a bunch of options having to do with the main content, such as related movie synopsis, bios, and YouTube videos.
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Shane Buettner Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
Arcam is one of those legendary "low end of the high end" amp makers that traditionally "punches above its weight," if you'll forgive the use of two audio-reviewing cliches in one sentence. Now it's in the iThing docking system business with the rCube ($800), shipping now.
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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
These ultra-slim 21.5-inch 2D monitors from LG are 1920 x 1080, with a claimed response time of 2ms and contrast ratio of 10M:1, and D-sub (computer RGB), DVI,and HDMI inputs.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
For its new gallery on-walls, Klipsch borrowed technology from other product lines, including the distortion-killing "linear travel suspension" tweeter from the new Reference line and the woofer from the bestselling Quintet sat/sub set. There will be four passive models, including the big placement-friendly G42 LCR, with its 90 x 90 degree Tractrix horn, available in summer. Prices range from $199-699. There are also three active models, which are Apple AirPlay certified, priced at $400-800. The picture shows some of the passive models and does not do them justice. They looked really good.
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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jan 07, 2011 Published: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
Panasonic came up with a nifty solution to the problem of demonstrating 3D with glasses. The glasses are fixed in the vertical supports shown, which easily slide up and down to fit the height of the viewer.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
Updating a classic, MK Sound premiered the new version of the company’s popular S150 monitor. The new model, the S150 MKII THX Ultra2, features the same redesigned tweeter recently introduced in the 950 THX Select2 bookshelf. Also introduced were a new matching tripole surround for the S150 system, MK Sound’s first on-wall speakers, and a new in-wall and on-wall speaker.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
We're pleased to announce that the AudioQuest exhibit has won the Home Theater 2011 CES Blog's Award for Distinguished Achievement in Promotional Artwork Evoking a Nightmare for this image of the giant red wolves that savaged us in our dreams. Yeah, go ahead and laugh, but we woke up in our hotel bed missing a leg.
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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jan 07, 2011 Published: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
Panasonic demonstrated 3DTV from a DirecTV feed, presumably using the using the side-by-side 3D technique. But while the images would likely satisfy the uncritical viewer, the pictures lacked that last spark of detail. The side-by-side technique discards 50% of the horizontal resolution, resulting in 960 x 1080 images.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
3D isn’t just for your living room TV. Innovision showed off one of the company’s HoloAD “three-dimensional holographic messenger” that creates glasses-free 3D moving images. Innovision promotes the cool-looking device to be used for digital signage.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
Who can resist an app featuring the famous power meters, here displayed on an iPad (shown) sitting atop a McIntosh docking box (not shown). The app already has 30,000 admirers, judging from the number of people who have downloaded it.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
Running wires to the rear speakers of a 5.1 or 7.1 system is always problematic. Several companies demonstrated wireless add-on devices, but the Link-Mount is the most unusual and clever solution I’ve seen so far. The wireless receiver/amp is built into a universal speaker wall bracket. A DC power cord is then run through the wall to a termination plate where you connect the wire to a transformer plugged into an electrical outlet. Since it’s DC running through the wall, no electrician is necessary. Pricing is in the $400 range for a pair of brackets and a transmitter.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
Onkyo announced that they are partnering with Rocketboost for use in a slew of new wireless products to come in 2011. All Onkyo AVRs introduced this year will be Rocketboost-ready via a transceiver module connected to the AVR through a proprietary U-Port connection. The wireless transmission can be used for a second zone of audio or for wireless rear channel speakers. All Rocketboost accessories are compatible regardless of manufacturer.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
Why shouldn't your multiroom preamp recognize each member of the family and his/her favorite source components? The Audio Design Associates Suite 32 does just that, "redefining multiroom" with its Profiler software. If your daughter uses just an iPod and satellite dish, that's all she'll see on the keypad. The hardware looks kind of like two Suite 16s bolted together in a single chassis. Pricing starts at $10,000 for the preamp. Add another zero for keypads, amps, and such. ADA also talked up its TEQ Trinnov room EQ system, not for the first time, but it's shipping soon. TEQ is more sophisticated than the version of Trinnov built into Sherwood receivers -- for instance, whatever mic you use will have its own calibration file which will be fed into the system before it starts making decisions about what room correction your space needs.
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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jan 08, 2011 0 comments
With several manufacturers showing new 3DTV sets using passive rather than active glasses, Samsung took pains to point out the pros and cons of each device. Naturally, since Samsung does active glasses only at present, the pros outweighed the cons for the active glasses. Note some surprising items on the passive glasses list in the photo. The higher power consumption comes from the need for higher peak output to overcome the inherent loss of brightness with passive glasses due to the special patterned retarder filter that's used on the screen. And Samsung actually demonstrated the off-axis issues in a passive glasses set during a closed demonstration for the press. As always, however, the proof is in the reviewing and we're anxious to check out the new passive glasses sets for ourselves and come to our own conclusions.

With several manufacturers showing new 3DTV sets using passive rather than active glasses, Samsung took pains to point out the pros and cons of each device. Naturally, since Samsung does active glasses only at present, the pros outweighed the cons for the active glasses. Note some surprising items on the passive glasses list in the photo. The higher power consumption comes from the need for higher peak output to overcome the inherent loss of brightness with passive glasses due to the special patterned retarder filter that's used on the screen. And Samsung actually demonstrated the off-axis issues in a passive glasses set during a closed demonstration for the press. As always, however, the proof is in the reviewing and we're anxious to check out the new passive glasses sets for ourselves and come to our own conclusions.

Samsung also showed new, redesigned active glasses for its new 2011 3D sets.

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