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CEDIA 2010

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
Also at the Runco press conference was a new line of thin plasmas called Vistage. Interestingly, the rep avoided using the word "plasma," instead calling it a flat panel based on "emissive cell structure." C'mon, it's a plasma! Granted, it has a number of refinements, including optical precision glass and an outboard DHD processor, and it did look quite good in the demo. Three sizes will be available—50, 58, and 63 inches for $6000, $8000, and $10,000, respectively.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 23, 2010 1 comments
Another new product in the NuVision booth was the FX10CS LED-backlit LCD TV, which will be available next year in 55- and 72-inch (!) sizes for $9000 and $16,000, respectively. This model uses LG's panels with true 480Hz refresh rate; the 55-incher has 240 backlight zones, while the 72-inch monster has 480 zones.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 23, 2010 2 comments
The Anthem 700 ($1999), 500 ($1499), and 300 ($999) receivers all have the company's proprietary ARC auto setup and room correction, Dolby Volume low-volume listening mode, Dolby Pro Logic IIz height listening mode, power rated with all channels driven, linear power supplies, and discrete output devices. The top two models have USB inputs that can support a large external drive, generating a full content list with ease. Not all competing USB-equipped receivers can support a large drive. Shipping in 30 days, except the 300, shipping in 60 days.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 23, 2010 3 comments
The big story at Sony's press conference was the VPL-VW90ES SXRD projector with 3D capabilities. This is the first projector to carry the company's ES (Elevated Standard) designation, which includes a 5-year warranty among other things.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 23, 2010 0 comments
Struggling with an in-wall speaker in one hand and a drill in the other is the bane of the custom installer. RBH offers a solution in the QM-615. It comes with a two-way Allen wrench. Connect the speaker cables, pop in the speaker, and use the rounded end of the Allen wrench to punch in spring-loaded tabs which lock the speaker into place. The more conventional end of the Allen wrench would be used to lift the tabs and remove the speaker. Price is $250/pair, shipping now. RBH also showed the new Signature SX line, with a full range of sizes and eventually some custom veneers.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 23, 2010 1 comments
When chip giant IDT bought the HQV technology form Silicon Optix almost two years ago, I was a bit concerned for its future. But I needn't have worried—IDT has continued to develop the algorithms with spectacular results. At a breakfast demo today, we saw a prototype of IDT's latest algorithms, which provide motion estimation and motion compensation (MEMC) frame interpolation for 120Hz ad 240Hz LCD TVs.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 23, 2010 0 comments
The new Sharp ZV2-1700 is the first new 3D projector we've officially heard about at the show, but we know it won't be the last. It's a 1-chip DLP. Like the Quattron 3D sets it comes with 2 pair of active 3D shutter glasses. These are triggered not only by a IR link, but by DLP-Link as well. The latter places invisible white frames into the image periodically to trigger the glasses, which works better than the usual IR link for larger, more widely seated audiences——more likely with a projector than with a flat panel display.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 23, 2010 0 comments
The beautiful Totem Tribe 5 is 48 inches high with four Montreal-made woofers and a tweeter with no crossover circuitry to pollute the sound. It is ported at both the top and bottom of the enclosure and can produce SPLs of up to 110dB into eight ohms. The speaker can function as an LCR, so you can use five or more of them in a surround system, though Totem also offers smaller complementary models. Price is $3000 with custom finish or $2200 if you're not as fussy. Want sub with that? The Tribe Sub sells for $1795 with outboard amp. It can sit on a pedestal, hide under the sofa, or be built into a wall.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 23, 2010 1 comments
The CEDIA nightlife got off to a grand start at the Georgia Aquarium Wednesday evening, where Meridian hosted a delightful party. A scuba diver greeted guests while gigantic whale sharks and other denizens of the deep slowly cruised by. The acrylic window that separated us from the fish measures 63 feet long by 27 feet high, and it's two feet thick to hold back 6.3 million gallons of artificial sea water.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 23, 2010 0 comments
Which would you rather have, a budget receiver with networking features for $500, or one without them for $400? We ran a picture of the second one, the RD-705, just to mess with you a little, but the correct answer is the first one, namely the RD-705i. It has DLNA certification to pull media off your router-connected PC's hard drive and also supports Bluetooth with an adapter and wi-fi with an adapter. For your subscription music fix there's Rhapsody and for your internet radio fix there's Pandora and SHOUTcast. Auto setup is Sherwood's proprietary SNAP, not the higher-end Trinnov it's licensed for a higher-end model. HDMI connectivity is 1.4a, not 1.4 as the literature says.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 23, 2010 0 comments
Sharp has finally introduced a 3D LCD TV in its Quattron line, which adds a yellow color filter to the conventional red, green, and blue filters. The LE925 will be available in two sizes—52 and 60 inches—for $4200 and $5300, respectively. Several technologies, including the separate yellow color, are said to almost double the brightness of 3D content compared with 3-color LCDs. The demo did look relatively bright, but Sharp's use of Despicable Me as demo material was unfortunate, since the 3D in that particular movie is very unimpressive. A different disc of custom content looked much better.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 23, 2010 0 comments
Along with just about everyone else at CEDIA, Mitsubishi is demonstrating a 3D projector, this one based on Sony's SXRD technology. The Diamond 3D has no official model number yet, but it's targeted to throw 1200 ANSI lumens with a dynamic contrast ratio of 150,000:1. Interestingly, it can use Panasonic or Toshiba active glasses, though no glasses or IR emitter are included for an undisclosed price that I was told will be "less than the Sony."
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 23, 2010 0 comments
T he rest of the industry may not be ready to abandon dome tweeters, but Sandy Gross and his new company, GoldenEar Technology, are using accordion-like High-Velocity Folded Ribbon (HVFR) high-frequency drivers in place of the ubiquitous domes found in 90-some-odd percent of the speakers currently on the market. The HVFR drivers work in a manner similar to an accordion and generate sound by squeezing a folded diaphragm from the sides rather than in an up-and-down motion. The result is a dramatically open, sublime sound free of any listening fatigue you might get from a lesser, standard driver – at least, that’s what I heard in the GoldenEar Technology booth earlier this morning. The HVFR tweeters are in the $1,249/ea floor-standing Triton Two Towers, the$499/ea SuperSat satellites , and the $249/ea SuperSat 50 satellites. GoldenEar Technology is also introducing a pair of powered subwoofers (ForceField 3 - $499, ForceField 4 - $699).
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 23, 2010 2 comments
NuVision is getting in the 3D game with the FX10LS LED-edgelit LCD TVs. The largest 55-incher will be the first to ship for $7000, followed by the 46-inch ($5500) and 40-inch ($4500). This TV uses Samsung panels with a true 240Hz refresh rate, and the demo looked quite good.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 23, 2010 2 comments
Two subs in Paradigm's Signature Series have hexagonal enclosures to defeat bass-polluting vibration with six drivers inside. The SUB 1 has 1700 watts and sells for $4499. The SUB 2 has 4500 watts, sells for $8999, and will be a limited production run, so act fast if you want it. Of course all the brawn in the world still won't provide tuneful bass if your room's standing wave is muddying the waters -- but these elite subs use Paradigm's Perfect Bass Kit to measure the room and apply appropriate correction.

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