CEDIA 2010

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 24, 2010 1 comments
Among all the super-expensive projectors at CEDIA, some of the biggest buzz has been about Epson's entry into the LCoS market, which turns out not to be entirely true. In fact, Epson has developed a new but related imaging technology it calls "3LCD Reflective," which is basically liquid crystal on quartz instead of silicon. (Keep in mind that quartz is silicon dioxide, so maybe it's not that different after all.)
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
Look carefully at the HSi-430 in-ceiling speaker at the Boston Acoustics booth and you'll see the slot-shaped vent holes just outside the surround. This one has a round grille but there are also square-grille and subwoofer versions, all selling for $250/each. Boston has added a skinny tower to its Reflection line, the RS326, $1000/each. And its TVee Model 30 bar earns its $600 pricetag with separate EQ modes for both music and TV/video soundtracks. It has built-in Dolby Digital (but not DTS 5.1) decoding, which should at least suit ATSC broadcasts which use DD.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
At the high end of SIM2's extensive projector lineup is the Teatro 50 (single-lamp, 5000 lumens, $60,000) and 80 (dual-lamp, 8000 lumens, $70,000). As you might guess from the prices, both are 3-chip designs.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
The Rotel RKB-1508 delivers eight channels of 65-watt Class D. That enables it to be small, run cool, and shave your power bill. Just the thing if you need to jam an eight-channel amp into a tight spot. Price $1199.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
As I was walking back from the Runco press conference, I passed a huge room occupied by chip maker Analog Devices, so I stopped in to see what it had cooking. I'm glad I did—among the demos was a new audio processor intended to give soundbars the ability to reproduce a true 3D soundfield, and it worked shockingly well.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
Wisdom Audio makesd highly specialized and very expensive in-wall audio systems. The utilize line-array full-range speakers with the midrange and high end covered by long planar drivers, the lower end by several mid-sized bass units per channel, and, now, humongous subwoofers consisting of two 15" PRO drivers in cabinets estimated at over 12 cubic feet. Wisdom's brochure assures us that these 17.75" wide, 36" deep, and (I'd guess) five feet high monsters are "space efficient!" But they are designed to be hidden away.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 24, 2010 1 comments
Runco had a lot to talk about at its press conference, starting with the D-73d 3D projector. As you can see, it looks like two stacked projectors, but the Runco rep insisted that it's one projector with dual single-chip DLP imaging and LED light engines, an approach Runco calls Constant Stereoscopic Video (CSV). Unlike most 3D displays out there today, this one uses circular polarization, which means it needs a special silver screen that the company certifies under its PISCES (Polarized Image Sequence Conservation and Enhancement Standard) program. The high-end polarized glasses are called PreciseLight and can be made as clip-ons and even prescription as well as conventional.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
The Viva Utopia is the latest entry in Focal's Utopia range. Its flanking woofers and a mid-tweeter array can be used horizontally or vertically, serving as perhaps the world's priciest LCR. Used vertically, the top and bottom woofers can be tilted (as shown) at various angles to optimize the arrival times at the main listening position. When used as a horizontal center, however, the woofer modules are locked in a straight-ahead orientation, with the mid-tweeter array is rotated 90-degrees. Both of these adjustments must be performed at the factory; if this arrangement is needed the unit must be specifically ordered as a horizontal center. $12,500 each.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
Atlantic Technology uses cabinet-related techniques developed in collaboration with designer Phil Clements to achieve truly scary deep bass response from small cabinets and 5.25-inch woofers. This H-PAS technology was a highlight of the last CEDIA. At this year's show the floorstanding Model AT-1 ($2500/pair, shipping now) has been joined by the stand-mount Model AT-2 ($1500/pair, shipping February). The demo seemingly defied the laws of physics, achieving the kind of bass you'd expect from a decent midpriced subwoofer, except without the sub. Without even a floorstanding enclosure. We wouldn't have believed it if we hadn't heard it.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
If you don't know the drill, you will soon. That 3DTV from brand A will only work with the glasses from brand A, not from brand B, C, or D. But Monster Cable has an answer. The new Monstervision Max 3D glasses are said to work on any 3DTV.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
Jon Herron was kind enough to pose next to Wisdom Audio's STS sub, with dual 15-inch woofers in a fridge-size cabinet that can vent through front or side. It is up to 101dB sensitive, make that 130dB at 20Hz, and don't try that at home. Price $10,000, shipping end of month. See item by Tom Norton.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
Want to use AirPlay to connect your Denon XX11-series a/v receiver to your iTunes library? There's an app for that, and while it's a $49 value, you can get it as a free upgrade for awhile starting in November. Denon also has a separate receiver-control app for iThings.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 24, 2010 1 comments
Projectiondesign's press conference concentrated on the Optix SuperWide 235 (around $39,000 with a standard lens), whose DLP imaging chip boasts a native resolution of 2560x1600, though this model uses only 1080 horizontal lines. This projector can display any aspect ratio from 1.33:1 to 2.40:1 at constant height without needing an anamorphic lens or zoom memories, which rob the image of brightness. For wide-screen Blu-rays, it scales the image vertically and horizontally using Sigma Designs VXP processing and two custom FPGA (field-programmable gate array) chips to fill the 2560x1080 pixel structure and maintain a 12-bit color depth per channel.

The demo was shown on a 13-foot-wide Da-Lite Affinity screen (1.1 gain) with a hand-built prototype with only one of two lamps in operation, so we were seeing a peak-level of about 7.5 foot-lamberts. Clips from Paul Blart: Mall Cop and Spider-Man 3 looked quite good, though I would not have chosen Paul Blart—what an awful movie!

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 24, 2010 0 comments
The front of the Classé CT0M600 mono-block amp does double duty as faceplate and ventilation panel, with heat vented around the dove grey center papel. The 600-watt amp costs $6500 -- multiply that by five, seven, or whatever. To go with it you may want the SSP-800 pre-pro which is HDMI 1.4 compliant and goes for $9500. The company also showed the CP-800 stereo preamp with iPod-savvy USB input, jitter reduction, and bass management, the latter unusual and welcome in a two-channel piece. Price TBA.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 24, 2010 1 comments
Like Runco, SIM2 is taking a dual-projection approach to 3D. In this case, however, two C3X Lumis 3-chip DLP projectors are stacked in a frame for $80,000. And instead of using polarization or active-shutter glasses, SIM2 decided to go with Infitec color filters, the same technology used in Dolby 3D, which means it does not require a special screen. The projection filters can be moved in and out of the light path much like an anamorphic lens on a sled to accommodate 3D and 2D, for which the system can shine 2500 and 6000 lumens, respectively.

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