CEDIA 2010

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
The DCL-200FD LED-illuminated DLP projector from Wolf Cinema isn't new at the show, but I saw it in action for the first time here, pictured above with a fixed anamorphic lens. Said to produce 850 ANSI lumens after calibration, it was demonstrated on a Screen Innovations Black Diamond II screen (0.8 gain, 16:9, 96 inches wide) playing the Pixar short Jack-Jack Attack, and it looked gorgeous. It's shipping now for $25,000.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
Upstart startup cable manufacturer from Australia, Kordz (evidently those Aussies can’t spell), demonstrated the company’s HDMI cables are not only high speed, they’re designed to be bent up to 90 degrees – something very welcome to installers and others who’ve ever had to deal with HDMI cables hanging off the back of a deep AVR.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
Optoma has a new outboard 3D converter, which should be available in November. The projected price of this small, unassuming box is expected to be $399, and it is said to be compatible with any projector that can do 720p and 120Hz. The demo was not encouraging, but perhaps some fine tuning will line things up better.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
PSB's Paul Barton insists that his new CS100 Universal Speaker can go anywhere inside or outside, though at $499/pr we'd at least be inclined to put it under an outside eave or something to protect it from a severe drenching. And don't try to use it under water; it's not a below water pool speaker. Apart from such abuse, however, it could well be just the ticket for singing in the rain.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
NuVision was demonstrating its P2, LED-illuminated, 2D single-chip DLP projector on an 87" wide, Stewart Studiotek 130 screen. Using 0.95-inch DLP chip, or DMD, it was more than satisfyingly bright and punchy, though I did note what appeared to be a slightly too vivid color balance and (perhaps) minor gamma issues. $17,000. The anamorphic lens shown in the photo is an extra cost option, and was not used in the demo.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
Surge protection and power conditioning often seem like an industry filled with smoke and mirrors – and full of dubious, hard-to-verify claims of protection. SurgeX brought some heavy duty surge-generating equipment to demonstrate how other types of surge protection devices react under real-world electrically stressful situations. The brand-obscured surge suppressor being used here would have left some home theater owner heading to the repair shop had a real component been hooked up to the outlet when a bad surge came down the line. SurgeX claims their devices are designed to resist surges at much higher levels than the competition can handle without self-destructing – and they can do it repeatedly (like well over 30,000 times).
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
The five small satellites in Phase Technology’s new $930 CineMicro One 5.1-channel speaker system use all-wood “acoustically neutral” curved enclosures, Absolute Phase crossover networks, and long-throw woofers. The sub that’s included in the package incorporates an eight-inch down-firing woofer in a rear slotted-port design and a built-in 100-watt amp.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 26, 2010 1 comments
One of Wolf Cinema's big introductions at CEDIA is the DCC-100FD single-chip DLP projector that uses a conventional lamp and color wheel. What's the big deal about that? It costs only $10,000 (including the company's outboard processor and Variscope lens memories for 2.35:1 and 16:9 content at constant height), which is a real bargain coming from Wolf.

The demo unit was a prototype; production units should be shipping by early next year. We saw a clip from Avatar on a Screen Innovations Black Diamond II (0.8 gain, 16:9, 96 inches wide), which looked great. I saw no hint of the dreaded rainbow artifact, but we'll have to see what Tom Norton says about that, since he's much more sensitive to it that I am.

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
Jeff Graham, CEO of iSky, shows off a demonstration mockup of an iSky fiber optic star ceiling panel with blue LED lighting around the edges. iSky panels can be mounted directly to the ceiling or used with regular drop ceilings. Each iSky panel contains a built-in illuminator and only requires a low-voltage jumper between panels. The constant-voltage design is said to be simpler to install than a more complex constant-current system. In addition to looking incredibly cool, the iSky panels also be ordered as reflector or diffuser panels for acoustic treatment of your home theater’s ceiling.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 26, 2010 0 comments
High-end speaker maker Focal brought the company’s new highly affordable Bird speaker line to spread its wings at CEDIA. The three different Bird-series 2.1-channel packages include a pair of satellites and an amplifier with a built-in subwoofer (yes, that’s an amplifier with a built-in sub, not the other way around). Look for 5.1-channel versions next year.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 26, 2010 1 comments
Schneider is one of the most respected names in anamorphic lenses for 2.35:1 projection. The newest edition to its extensive line is the Cine-Digitar Anamorphic CDA 1.33x EL, designed for small to medium sized projectors. When it becomes available later this year there will be a promotional price on a package combining this lens with a Kino-Torsion motorized deployment system (a motorized "sled," though Schneider's Kino-Torsion model operates more like a swinging door to move the lens in and out of the way as needed). The rep on hand stated the promotional price at $4500; I was not sure at first if this meant dealer cost (CEDIA is of course, a trade show) or MSRP to the consumer. He hesitantly said it's to the consumer, so we can all hope. For those in the know, this is not a high price for a first class anamorphic lens and motorized mechanism.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 25, 2010 2 comments
The Sharp 3D projector mentioned in our report on Wednesday's press conference was on demonstration on the show floor. Within the limits of the available animated material, in this case Despicable Me, it looked amazingly good. At a projected price of around $5000, give or take, it's one of the least expensive 3D projectors we've seen so far. And with a 250W UHP lamp, it was also plenty bright, at least in 3D terms, on an 87" wide, Stewart Studiotek 130 screen.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Sep 25, 2010 1 comments
You might think CEDIA would be a poor environment in which to meet women – but it turns out that a broad assortment of the best and brightest women in the CE business were in attendance at the Women in CE Breakfast Saturday morning. The organization aims to help women become a more important part of the industry than simply the “W” in Wife Acceptance Factor, and today’s annual meeting kept them abreast of the many benefits of mentoring. Interestingly, the sponsor (who shall remain nameless but she knows who she is) of the table at which I sat had mentored me in the fine act of drinking me under the table the day before, so I feel perfectly justified making this politically incorrect post.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 25, 2010 0 comments
At $15,000, the new LG CF3D, shown here vertically behind a highly reflective glass case, utilizes two separate optical paths to provide a full 1920 x 1080 3D image using polarized passive glasses on a silvered screen. The demo, however, was disappointing. While the booth was not light controlled, the main problem was a very soft-looking image. Teething or setup problems, perhaps? The projector is in production now, and will be available here in November.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 25, 2010 0 comments
We can think of a few other manufacturers who have showed impressive-sounding new speakers behind an acoustically porous curtain and then whipped the curtain aside to reveal a compact satellite/subwoofer set. The latest is Cambridge Audio's Minx, with its three-inch cube available in single (Min-10) or dual (Min-20) versions with three tough little subs. The smallest 5.1 configuration would cost a reasonable $550/set with additional cubes at $80/each. If you are considering adding, say, DPLIIz height or DSX width speakers to your system with minimal fuss, this modular easy-mount approach may be just the thing. The full-range drivers had a pleasingly warm sound that did well with male vocals and had no nasty ringing. Bass was strong if a little tubby (but we were sitting against the rear wall). Minx got our attention and we hope to follow up with a review.

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