CEDIA 2009

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 10, 2009 0 comments

Aside from the DLS-RS4000 4K behemoth, no less than six new projectors were announced at JVC's press conference today—three in the Reference series from the company's professional division and three in the Procision line from the consumer group, all with HQV video processing. At the top of the heap are the DLA-HD990 and RS35, which feature hand-selected and -tuned optics, 70,000:1 native contrast ratio with no dynamic iris, inverse telecine back to 24fps with 96Hz refresh rate, and ISF and THX certification. Both will list for $10,000 and should be available this month. Stepping down the model ladder, we come to the HD950 and RS25, with 50,000:1 contrast and THX movie mode for $8000. The entry level is occupied by the HD550 ($5000) and RS15 ($5500) with 35,000:1 and 30,000:1 contrast, respectively. The demos looked quite good, especially because JVC always goes to great lengths to show its projectors in a darkened environment.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 10, 2009 0 comments
More on Procella: "You can't buy them" -- that's what visiting engineers used to be told by the denizens of the DTS testing room in Europe. That is what inspired the Procella folks to go into the speaker business. Following a third-generation redesign, now you can buy them. Shown is the P8, bolted on the P15, and don't call the latter a subwoofer. It's a "powered bass unit" that goes down to 40Hz at a thundering 126dB.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 09, 2009 Published: Sep 10, 2009 0 comments

In the realm of front projectors, Sony unveiled the VPL-VW85 (though Tom Norton has already conducted a review of a pre-production unit for <I>Home Theater</I>, and he liked it very much). With a new auto iris, it claims a dynamic contrast ratio of 120,000:1, and it refreshes the image at 120Hz with dark-frame insertion, a Sony hallmark. It should hit retailers in October for around $8000.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 09, 2009 Published: Sep 10, 2009 2 comments

Sony's press conference was awash in new products, such as the BDP-CX7000ES 400-disc changer, which can accommodate Blu-rays, DVDs, and CDs. This Profile 2.0 player connects to the Internet in order to access BD-Live content, update the firmware, and download Gracenote MusicID and VideoID data related to the discs it holds, making it easy to find what you want. The retail price is $1900, and it's available now.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 10, 2009 0 comments

This skinny subwoofer, dubbed the Suitcase Subwoofer (SCS) because of its shape, hardly looks like it can go deep, but it does. Even more surprising is the driver compliment, which consists of two 5x7-inch "woofers" at the mouth of what Wisdom calls a complimentary folded horn. Only the horn's port is visible, and it can be configured to exit the cabinet on the front or either side, making placement very flexible. This serves the company's goal of a sub that can be placed where traditional subs can't, such as behind or under furniture. Power is supplied by a 500W amp, and the list price will be around $4000 when it ships in October.

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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 10, 2009 0 comments
AudioQuest showed a desert menu of HDMI cables, though we don't know how gemstones fit into the mix. Now you can have a chocolate mid-brightness region on your HDTV.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
LG has brought wireless to some of its new LCD HDTVs. The flagship 55-inch, 55LHX (shown, $4799) offers wireless operation of up to 30 feet between the supplied media box to which the sources are connected (shown on the right in the photo) and the set itself. Just as important for enthusiasts, however, is the set's LED backlighting with local dimming, for a claimed 5,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
A company best known for architectural speakers moves into multizone technology with a vengeance. Nirv is the name the tattooed folks at Speakercraft have given to a system that operates with the 10-button remote pictured here. The remote's got a mic built into it, for home intercom use, and that barely scratches the surface. The concept is to use a single Cat5 cable to send HD video, HD audio, control, data, paging, and voice anywhere in the home. Any zone can be turned into a home theater and grab content from any source in any other zone. The system learns how you use it. Settings follow users from room to room, including parental controls, indicating unseen depths of moral fiber in people with multiple pieces of body art, or maybe it's just Metamucil. An installer can walk the user through setup, and when that's done, an easy repeatable interface takes over. Dealer cost 10 grand. In addition to the Ruckus speakers already reported on, Speakercraft also announced several new in-wall and in-ceiling models, including the AIM 10, a three-way, 10-inch pivoting unit selling for $8250-1125. Oh, and a debut surround receiver was also announced -- the Vital 910 ($1125). This company was always interesting. Now it's fascinating.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 09, 2009 1 comments
Phil Clements, father of H-PAS technology, explains its use in a bar speaker. While Atlantic is studying this prospect, the product shown is pre-H-PAS. It is a seven-channel configuration with three tweeters and two 4x6-inch woofers in the front and two on the sides for surrounds. Channels are shared among the drivers with a triple voice coil structure. A "180-degree feel" is promised.The bar is the FS-7.0. With eight-inch sub, it is the SB-8800 system. Shipping in September for $800 (for the bar) and $300 (for the sub).
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
Sony is launching the new Bravia XBR10 series at CEDIA, featuring an ultra thin design, wireless transmission, an Ethernet connection for receiving Sony Bravia Internet Video over broadband, Motionflow 240Hz, and edge-lit LED backlighting— but no local dimming. The only Sony local dimming models are the XBR8s, and they are being phased out. There may be new local dimming models from the company down the road, according to one Sony source, but I suspect not this year. The XBR 10s are available at 47-inches ($4500) and 52-inches ($5000).
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
LG Electronics has just added the high-definition streaming movie service from Vudu, Inc. to its BD390 Wireless Network Blu-ray Player. Vudu offers rental or purchase of a wide range of movie and TV titles, including more than 2,200 in 1080p. The BD390 ($399) currently provides Netflix, Roxio, CinemaNow, and YouTube streaming content as part of its “NetCast Entertainment Access” feature. The Vudu addition will be available later this month (September 2009) as a free player upgrade.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
Harman Kardon, the first receiver maker to feature Dolby Volume, has added it to three models. That's good news because Dolby Volume will even out level differences among source inputs and make dynamically extreme movie soundtracks less excruciating. The new models start at $600 and 50 watts times seven for the AVR 1600. Step up to the AVR 2600 for $800 and you'll get 65 wpc, Faroudja Torino video processing, and compatibility with the Bridge III (optional) which brings iPod docking and charging. Step further up to the AVR 3600 for $1200 and get 80 wpc with the Bridge III supplied. We hope to get the latter (pictured) for review.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
This mockup gives an indication of what the production model may look like. However, Atlantic is studying the use of 5.25-inch woofers in lieu of the 4.5-inchers shown here. It may ship in December give or take a month. Atlantic also plans to license the technology to a half-dozen other manufacturers including at least one "super high end" player and various "upper mid-fi" brands, according to Tribeman.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 09, 2009 4 comments
Sony is introducing the CX7000ES Blu-ray mega-changer ($1900) to complement the BDP-CX960 Blu-ray changer ($800) currently available. The BDP-CX7000ES can hold up to 400 discs—either Blu-ray, standard DVD, or CD—. Sony made it a point to mention that four of these changers piggybacked together can hold all of the Blu-ray titles currently on the market! The player can download all relevant disc information via a broadband connection to Gracenote.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
Also introduced were two new receivers, the STR-DA5500ES ($2000) with 120 watts time seven and STR-DA3500ES ($1000) with 100 watts time seven. The first model got the most attention, with Control4 IP network control -- so your Sony receiver can now handle lighting, security, and other home automation features -- and DLNA compatibility which provides access to PC-stored music, video, and photos via ethernet connection.

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