CEDIA 2009

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 09, 2009 Published: Sep 10, 2009 0 comments

Networking is big at Sony, as demonstrated by the new BDP-N460 Blu-ray player. Like many Sony TVs, this BD-Live player can access streaming content from over 20 online providers in the Sony Bravia Internet Video Link stable, which will soon include Netflix. Special embedded software is designed to be used with Linksys dual-band routers for optimized wireless streaming. Look for it in October for less than $250.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 10, 2009 0 comments

I hadn't heard of the Quantum before the show. This is Projectiondesign's "entry level" projector, which should be shipping next month for roughly $11,750, depending on the selected lens. It's small but mighty with a 220W UHP lamp and high-quality optics.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 10, 2009 0 comments
Two years ago, PSB introduced the top-line Synchrony line. A year ago an almost equally high-end line was added, the Imagine. With the revised version of the Image, PSB's number three falls into place. There are two towers and three monitors and -- tower-averse as we are -- we think matched sets of any of the latter would make a fine basis for a system. These two-way stand-mounts include the B6 (6.5-inch woofer, $499/pair), B5 (5.25-inch, $399/pair), and B4 (four-inch, $299/pair). We've heard the B6 and B4 and they're superb, with more bass than you'd expect. This is one of the few speaker brands whose founder, Paul Barton, spends significant amounts of time in China QC-ing the product.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 09, 2009 Published: Sep 10, 2009 0 comments

At LG's press conference, we got our first look at the new SL90 series of LCD TVs, which sport LED edge lighting. This precludes local dimming but allows a super-slim profile of only 1.15 inches. Also of note is LG's "single layer" design, in which a single piece of glass covers both the screen and narrow bezel. Two screen sizes will be available later this Fall—42 inches ($2100) and 47 inches ($2400).

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 10, 2009 2 comments

Completing Pioneer's THX story at CEDIA is the newly announced certification of its Elite EX series of architectural speakers. As a result, the company now offers THX-certified products that encompass the entire signal path from Blu-ray player through A/V receiver to speakers.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 10, 2009 3 comments
Trufig is a new brand from the founders of Sonance. Its job is to make touchscreens, lightswitches, and other custom installable goodies practically disappear into the wall, as you can see in the pic -- old-style fixtures at right, disappearing ones at left. It was inspired by the after-the-fact design process that's been taking place when Sonance's architectural speakers come up against the wishes of architects and interior designers. The things being made to disappear are not actually Sonance or Trufig products but things like Crestron touchscreens and Lutron light fixtures. Starting at $300 for a single-gang fixture, Trufig is not cheap, but it will presumably find its way into the high-end custom install market.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 09, 2009 4 comments
Sony is introducing the CX7000ES Blu-ray mega-changer ($1900) to complement the BDP-CX960 Blu-ray changer ($800) currently available. The BDP-CX7000ES can hold up to 400 discs—either Blu-ray, standard DVD, or CD—. Sony made it a point to mention that four of these changers piggybacked together can hold all of the Blu-ray titles currently on the market! The player can download all relevant disc information via a broadband connection to Gracenote.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
Also introduced were two new receivers, the STR-DA5500ES ($2000) with 120 watts time seven and STR-DA3500ES ($1000) with 100 watts time seven. The first model got the most attention, with Control4 IP network control -- so your Sony receiver can now handle lighting, security, and other home automation features -- and DLNA compatibility which provides access to PC-stored music, video, and photos via ethernet connection.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
LG Electronics also showed its new ultra thin “Full HD” LED LCD HDTV. The SL90 series, available in 42-inch and 47-inch sizes, features LED lighting with local dimming for a claimed dynamic contrast ratio of 3,000,000:1, a depth of 1.15 inches, extensive calibration capabilities, and TruMotion 120Hz.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
As we previously reported, the H-PAS speaker technology making its debut at Atlantic Technology's off-site exhibit has been one of the most eagerly awaited events of the show. Simply put, this bass-building speaker technology works -- with tympani, bass clarinet, and of course pipe organ. While the midrange was not perfectly balanced, and we were informed that voicing will be tweaked, it was clear that Atlantic is correct in claiming that deep bass episodes don't starve the mids and highs or collapse the soundstage. What makes it work is what Tribeman calls a cascading of well-known speaker design elements such as bass reflex, inverted horn, acoustic suspension, and transmission line. In other words, "it's all in the plumbing" -- the drivers and crossover are nothing special. Credit is due to the inventor, Phil Clements of Solus/Clements. The prototype shown uses a pair of 4.5-inch woofers and is said to be flat down to 30Hz.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 09, 2009 1 comments
It is large, as many of us discovered when we walked through it to get to the Omni for preshow events. Atlanta itself is large, spread out, surprisingly hilly, and not walkable. However, I am grateful to finally attend a CEDIA Expo on the east coast. Perhaps Atlanta will grow on me during the next two CEDIAs, which will return here.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
A new projector or two every year is a CEDIA tradition from Sony, and they did not disappoint us this year. The new VPL-VW85 video projector offers significantly enhanced brightness compared to the VPL-VW70 (known as the VPL-VW80 in some markets), and deep blacks courtesy of a combination of SXRD chips with superior contrast and Sony's well-established Advanced (dynamic) Iris. It also has a variety of user-selectable gamma settings, custom gamma adjustment via an external computer program, a Motion Enhancer feature operating at a 96Hz frame rate with the option of either full brightness or darkened interpolated frames, and an aspect ratio for use with an add-on anamorphic zoom lens. $8000, in October. A review of the VPL-VW85 is currently scheduled for the November 2009 issue of Home Theater. There's also a new, lower priced Sony SXRD projector, the VPL-HW15, with a claimed peak contrast ratio of 60,000:1 and 1000 ANSI lumens output at a suggested price of $3000. Also in October.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
The Sony BDP-N460 is a reasonably priced Blu-ray player, at $250, with built-in software designed to accommodate the Linksys/Cisco Wireless-N Ethernet Bridge with Dual Band (optional). Since a broadband connection is a must for a Blu-ray player with BD-Live capability, this wireless option may make streaming easier, operating in either the 2.4GHz or 5GHz bands. Blu-ray players are increasingly becoming networking machines and Sony doesn't want you to miss any of the internet content provided by its dozens of licensed partners.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
LG has brought wireless to some of its new LCD HDTVs. The flagship 55-inch, 55LHX (shown, $4799) offers wireless operation of up to 30 feet between the supplied media box to which the sources are connected (shown on the right in the photo) and the set itself. Just as important for enthusiasts, however, is the set's LED backlighting with local dimming, for a claimed 5,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 09, 2009 0 comments
A company best known for architectural speakers moves into multizone technology with a vengeance. Nirv is the name the tattooed folks at Speakercraft have given to a system that operates with the 10-button remote pictured here. The remote's got a mic built into it, for home intercom use, and that barely scratches the surface. The concept is to use a single Cat5 cable to send HD video, HD audio, control, data, paging, and voice anywhere in the home. Any zone can be turned into a home theater and grab content from any source in any other zone. The system learns how you use it. Settings follow users from room to room, including parental controls, indicating unseen depths of moral fiber in people with multiple pieces of body art, or maybe it's just Metamucil. An installer can walk the user through setup, and when that's done, an easy repeatable interface takes over. Dealer cost 10 grand. In addition to the Ruckus speakers already reported on, Speakercraft also announced several new in-wall and in-ceiling models, including the AIM 10, a three-way, 10-inch pivoting unit selling for $8250-1125. Oh, and a debut surround receiver was also announced -- the Vital 910 ($1125). This company was always interesting. Now it's fascinating.

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