CEDIA 2009

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
Yamaha used a proprietary wireless connection for the yAired music system. Unlike, say, Bluetooth, it has no compression, no latency, and no delay. Look for the MLR-140 in mid October.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments

Among the many new products introduced by Runco at CEDIA is a new entry-level line of DLP projectors, dubbed LightStyle. Three models comprise the line—the LS-3 ($5000) and LS-5 ($7000) are single-chip, 1080p, while the LS-7 ($15,500) is a 3-chip 720p. The sleek design looks more like a Planar projector, which is not surprising since Planar bought Runco in 2007.

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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 10, 2009 Published: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
Pioneer's Project ETAP is intended to lead to a product that will provide a wide range of home management and media storage and access. In addition to downloading, streaming, and storage of all variety of program material (the 1TB of on-board storage can be supplemented by external hard drives), it will likely offer additional core features, including those listed in the following blog entry.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
Lots of audio/video receiver makers are showing net-enabled receivers (and rarely calling them receivers). Sherwood's NetbBoxx R-904N has seven times 100 Class D watts and ships with both a front-panel USB input and a wireless dongle. Video is output at 720p/60. Compatible content sources include YouTube, Shoutcast internet radio, CinemaNow, Hulu, Netflix, CBS, CNN, and Amazon VOD. Shipping in October for $649, but not in white, the photo notwithstanding.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 10, 2009 Published: Sep 11, 2009 1 comments
The new Anthem Statement LTX 500v and LTX 300v projectors look a lot like the new JVC DLA-HD550 and DLA-HD950, and that's because they are, with small cosmetic differences. The Anthems are also slightly more expensive.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
Without any perforations in its surface, how does the RockSolid rock speaker emit sound? Using its polyurethane composite surface, which serves as a driver, excited by underlying magnets. Finishes include sandstone, charcoal, red rock, and custom versions. Pricing will range from $500 for a single speaker to $900-1000 for a dual version.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 10, 2009 Published: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
As the biggest entry in its premier line of DLP rear projection HDTVs, not to mention that Mitsubishi is the last holdout in this product category, this set has to grab attention. When I was there, however, there were more passers-by than onlookers. A shame; it offers a lot for the money if you want a really big screen and space is not an issue.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 2 comments
Given a choice between an iPod dock and a component that accepts a front-panel USB connection, we prefer the latter. And that's what's available in the Rotel RCX-1500 ($1499) CD receiver and RDG-1520 ($999). Both have FM and internet radio tuners but the 1500 also has a slot-load CD drive and 100 Class D watts times two.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
Thank you, Custom Electronic Design & Installation Association, for fostering the growth of an important industry, for staging an annual milestone in audio/video consciousness, and for encouraging a/v excellence in general.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
Of the two towers and one stand-mount labeled "new" at the Focal booth, the center of attention was the 30th anniversary tower, the 826W, at left, price n/a. New beryllium-tweeter models included two more towers and another stand-mount ranging from $4495/pair to $12,495/pair.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 11, 2009 1 comments
Panasonic certainly thinks so. While there is currently no standard for home 3D, a consortium of companies is working on one, and according to Panasonic reps a decision is expected before the January CES. That means we could see product and software within a year. The companies are pushing for a standard that will produce full 1080p resolution to both eyes using sequential frames and active shutter glasses--though I would expect to see some scalability based on price. But you will need a new TV and 3D Blu-ray player to take full advantage of it (HDMI 1.4 will be required).
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 1 comments
Samsung's HT-BD8200 soundbar has an integrated Blu-ray player, wireless sub, 300 total watts of power, 2.1-channel virtual surround technology, wi-fi readiness, Netflix savvy, and Pandora compatibility for $800. Also shown were a Blu-less bar, plus a couple of HTiBs, one based on a slim tower, one based on small satellites.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments

Another new "entry-level" DLP projector line introduced by Runco at CEDIA is the VX-3000, which replaces the RS-900. Three models will be available—VX-3000i ($9000, internal processor), VX-3000d ($12,000, DHD 3 external processor), and VX-3000d Ultra ($20,000, DHD 3, five lens options, can use CineWide with AutoScope anamorphic system). The color wheel in these projectors has been designed specifically for reproducing D65 white, and calibration reduces the light output much less than most projectors.

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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
There's a maniacal race afoot in the TV business for the lowest power consumption per inch-or the greenest set. Sharp's LE700U series is ready for the fight. The LC-52LE700U, shown here, is rated to draw 105W. In this demo, I saw it fluctuate between the roughly 98 watts shown here, on an image of average brightness, and about 150 watts. Since sets are always adjusted in show conditions for far more brightness than you'll need at home, the rating seems reasonable for normal domestic use.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
This Finnish manufacturers specializes in active, meaning powered, speakers. Its demo reviewed the reasons, which include eliminating impedance interaction between amps and speakers, and crossovers that don't heat up and waste juice. There were two demos, one of which featured the gigantic HTS3B shown here. Dynamics and admirable bass control were what we heard.

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