CEDIA 2009

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments

Another new "entry-level" DLP projector line introduced by Runco at CEDIA is the VX-3000, which replaces the RS-900. Three models will be available—VX-3000i ($9000, internal processor), VX-3000d ($12,000, DHD 3 external processor), and VX-3000d Ultra ($20,000, DHD 3, five lens options, can use CineWide with AutoScope anamorphic system). The color wheel in these projectors has been designed specifically for reproducing D65 white, and calibration reduces the light output much less than most projectors.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
Of the two towers and one stand-mount labeled "new" at the Focal booth, the center of attention was the 30th anniversary tower, the 826W, at left, price n/a. New beryllium-tweeter models included two more towers and another stand-mount ranging from $4495/pair to $12,495/pair.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
There's a maniacal race afoot in the TV business for the lowest power consumption per inch-or the greenest set. Sharp's LE700U series is ready for the fight. The LC-52LE700U, shown here, is rated to draw 105W. In this demo, I saw it fluctuate between the roughly 98 watts shown here, on an image of average brightness, and about 150 watts. Since sets are always adjusted in show conditions for far more brightness than you'll need at home, the rating seems reasonable for normal domestic use.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 11, 2009 5 comments

At CES last January, a group of journalists was invited to see a demo of HQV processing after the brand and intellectual property had been bought from Silicon Optix by IDT. Unfortunately, we were sworn to secrecy until the development was farther along. At CEDIA, the embargo has finally been lifted, and I can write about the new HQV Vida processing chip, which was launched at the end of July.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 1 comments
Samsung's HT-BD8200 soundbar has an integrated Blu-ray player, wireless sub, 300 total watts of power, 2.1-channel virtual surround technology, wi-fi readiness, Netflix savvy, and Pandora compatibility for $800. Also shown were a Blu-less bar, plus a couple of HTiBs, one based on a slim tower, one based on small satellites.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 10, 2009 Published: Sep 11, 2009 5 comments
Anthem has its first Blu-ray player, the Anthem Statement BLX200 ($800). It offers all the features of most BD machines, including Profile 2.0 with 1GB of memory and Internal decoding of the new high rez audio formats (or bitstream out if you prefer). If you're asking, like most BD players it does not play SACD or DVD-Audio.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
This Finnish manufacturers specializes in active, meaning powered, speakers. Its demo reviewed the reasons, which include eliminating impedance interaction between amps and speakers, and crossovers that don't heat up and waste juice. There were two demos, one of which featured the gigantic HTS3B shown here. Dynamics and admirable bass control were what we heard.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 10, 2009 Published: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
The folks from Accell make great HDMI switchers and splitters, but they also do cables, and while I visited there they handed me a sample of their new locking HDMI cables, a relatively new category and one long overdue.
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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
The Power WL subwoofers from Phase Technology can run wired or wireless using an uncompressed signal in the 2.4GHz band. They're available in eight-, ten-, or twelve-inch versions at prices from $900-1300, backed with a 900-watt amp, allowing linear peak-to-peak excursion of 2.5 inches. Why are the active drivers on the bottom and the passive radiators on the front? The designers found the subs were "walking themselves across the floor," and therefore swapped the drivers to keep them in one place.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 11, 2009 1 comments
Runco has announced the QuantumColor Q-750i single-chip DLP projector, its first model (and one of the industry's firsts) to utilize LEDs for its light source rather than a conventional projection lamp. Runco calls this technology InfiniLight, a name likely derived from the fact that the LEDs, which also replace the conventional DLP color wheel, can be modulated by the source to drop in level, or even shut off completely, in dark or fully black scenes or interscene blackouts.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
Sometimes it's easy to forget that CEDIA is aimed for custom installers. And installers need tools. The mad dogger from Mad Dog tools was busy demonstrating his all purpose, drill and mixmaster Cujo thingy.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments

Now that I've seen the new VX-33 projector after writing about it before the show, I can confirm that it is indeed bright enough to fill a giant screen and compete with some ambient light. The demo was a football game on a 14-foot-wide Stewart GrayHawk with the room lights on, and the picture was plenty punchy.

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
As greenfield home development dwindles, NuVo's Renovia may be the whole-house audio system of the future. We'll repeat the name, Renovia, and assume the hopeful implications are obvious. Don't want to poke holes in your older home for new wiring? Just use the existing power wiring via HomePlug 1.0. The system can cover up to 12 rooms with 50 watts per zone. If the two built-in AM/FM/Sirius tuners don't offer enough entertainment, throw in the Music Port Server, which adds XM, internet radio, Pandora, and RadioTime. Command the 320GB hard drive from any network-connected computer or touchscreen and bask in the auto synchronization tool.
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Tom Norton Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments
Sharp's new Aquos LE700U lineup includes sets at 52" (LC-52LE700U, $2800), 46"(LC-46LE700U, $2200), 40" (LC-40LE700U, $1700), and 32" (LC-32LE700U, $1100). All provide instant access to customized web-based content via Aquos Net, 120Hz operation, and claim drastically reduced energy consumption (see the following blog). They also employ full LED backlighting (not sidelighting) and claim a peak contrast ratio of 2,000,000:1, which sounds remarkable given that the LED backlights do not employ local dimming.
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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Sep 11, 2009 0 comments

One of the big buzzes at this year's show is LED illumination in front projectors, and Runco is in the thick of it with the Q-750, marketed under the QuantumColor moniker. This projector uses Luminus PhlatLight LEDs and recalibrates the color every time it's turned on, which guarantees no color shift over the life of the projector. Speaking of color, it can reproduce a gamut 135 percent larger than NTSC, and it comes with several preset gamuts, including Rec.709, SMPTE C, DCI (the digital-cinema standard), sRGB, Adobe RGB, and the native gamut of the LEDs.

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