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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 20, 2011 0 comments

Netflix announced this week that they were splitting their business, DVD/BD rentals on one side, streaming on the other. 

By all accounts, this seems like a perfectly crafted way to auger the company into the ground. Everyone hates it, customers are fleeing, there's no way it can work.

But. . . what if that's the point?

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Aug 28, 2013 0 comments

We’ve reviewed a bunch of Epson projectors over the past year or so. The 5020, for example, was an excellent projector. Lots of light output, decent contrast ratio.

The 750HD, on the other hand, offered ridiculous light output (and a not-so-great contrast ratio).

Two new models, just announced, aim to fill some gaps in the sub-$1,000 price range.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: May 17, 2012 0 comments

Announced today, Dolby has added a new trick to their TrueHD encoding. It allows studios and authoring houses a way to upconvert standard 48 kHz content (the sampling rate of most movies) to 96 kHz for Blu-ray.

At an event at Dolby headquarters in San Francisco, I got a chance to hear the results. Interestingly, it was quite... interesting.

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Lauren Dragan Posted: Jan 24, 2015 0 comments
In-ear headphone fans rejoice: the custom monitor is now available without the goo. This week at the NAMM show in Anaheim, Ultimate Ears showed off its partnership with United Sciences, which has come up with a way to use a laser 3D scanner to take a virtual “impression” of your ear canal. It’s all very sci-fi, and could change the entire face of headphones as we know it. How does it work?

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Lauren Dragan Posted: Sep 25, 2014 0 comments
After attending the phenomenal David Bowie exhibit at the Chicago MCA last week, I’m finding myself acutely aware of how much I miss regular access to art. As a college student studying music, and even as a high schooler fortunate enough to attend fantastic humanities classes, every day had some form of exposure to artistic endeavors. But once out of school, if we want to experience art, we have to seek it out. While we have plenty of access to media, one could argue that art is a bit tougher to come by. Of course, there are galleries to visit, which is wonderful and needs to be preserved, but unlike school, art no longer comes to you.

A few artists have come together to try to change all that. They took two things New Yorkers have encounters with daily: technology and advertisements, and created an innovative augmented reality art space...the NY subway station.
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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 18, 2011 0 comments


I'll be honest, I can think of few things less sexy to review than an antenna. This isn't because they're not useful, it's just without a lot of specialized equipment, there isn't much I can say about them.

I live in The Valley, with a direct line of sight to the HDTV transmitters that cover all of Los Angeles. On the clear day each year, I can see Mt. Wilson from my front door. TV reception is so good, I could stick my finger in a TV's antenna input and my dome could probably pull in a signal. Picture that for a second.

But The Leaf by Mohu is actually kinda cool, and looks very different from any antenna I've seen.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Mar 27, 2015 1 comments
I am a HUGE Bob Dylan fan. I have all his studio albums, most of his live albums, and all the “Bootleg” collections except for the most recent (it’s on the list).

So the arrival of a new Bob Dylan album is met, by this fan, by no small amount of excitement.

But Shadows in the Night, well, um… I don’t know what to make of it.

That not true. I know exactly what I think of it. I don’t like it. Does that make it bad?

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 02, 2014 3 comments
The Oculus Rift is the first virtual reality headset that actually works. Every person I’ve met that’s tried it experienced something between impressed shock and mind-blown awe. Since I first tried an early prototype two years ago it has improved dramatically.

Loving both the idea and the, ahem, reality of it, I bought one… sort of. Called a Development Kit, you can get one now too if you want. It’s not the final product, but it works.

So here’s my experience with a Rift at home.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jan 24, 2013 0 comments

The nerdworld exploded yesterday when news leaked that Disney had selected J.J. Abrams to direct the next Star Wars movie. J.J. Abrams is best known for the under-watched Alias, the over-watched Lost, and of course for resurrecting and rebooting the other great sci-fi franchise: Star Trek.

As one would expect from the most rabid fanbase in the world, hatred spewed forth.

But not from me. I say let him at it.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Aug 11, 2011 0 comments

There have been stirrings on the webs about a new push for OLED (or organic light emitting diode-based) TVs. These Holy Grail televisions promise the ultimate in black level, contrast ratio, and color fidelity, they poop kittens, solve baldness, and make people like you.

Most of that is true. Some. OK, part.

Sadly, an imminent OLED renaissance is still highly unlikely. Unlikely, like me dematerializing and rematerializing in the next room unlikely.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Aug 15, 2013 0 comments

Organic Light-Emitting Diode televisions have been perpetually on the horizon for what seems like forever. I remember first writing about the technology when I was at Home Theater magazine, which was multiple jobs ago (and, by the transitive properties, my current one as well).

Like any new technology, these TVs are expensive, but will they be worth it?

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Aug 29, 2015 4 comments
For as long as there have been movies, there have been movie critics. I’m sure 100 years ago there was some proto-Ebert giving a thumbs up to A Fool There Was and a thumbs down to The Cheat, angering fans of both in equal measure.

Art, especially when offered for sale, begets criticism. Such is the nature of the world. As much as I eschew, and actively dislike, traditional movie reviews, I can see their place.

But what you can’t do, as a creator, is attack your critics. Trust me, you want to, but you can’t.

It’s especially bad when your spouse does it. Which is exactly what happened between a fellow reviewer and the spouse of the writer of, I’m not kidding, Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2.

Let the fireworks begin. This will be amusing.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jul 27, 2012 0 comments

I have been a vocal hater of the "free" music service Spotify. The infinitesimal amount they paid for each song, to me, was a slap in the face to musicians everywhere. You can read my original rant on why I think Spotify is unfair, and the follow up where I recant slightly and recognize Spotify has some redeeming qualities.

Not that I ever expected it to go away, but far too many people love the service, including musicians. So I give up.

Sort of.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Aug 31, 2011 0 comments

I just finished a plasma TV review for an upcoming issue of S+V. As I was writing up its brightness and contrast ratios, I realized there could be some confusion about the numbers.

If you measure the contrast ratio of plasmas (all plasmas, not just this one) the same way you do other types of televisions - namely LCDs and projectors - they post poorer numbers than other technologies.

This isn't a performance issue as much as it's a measurement issue. And why that is . . . that's kinda interesting.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Jul 28, 2011 0 comments

I've got LG's new 50PZ950 plasma in my lab for an upcoming review in the magazine. The set had some cool features I didn't have space to mention, so I figured I could talk about them here instead.

The short version? It has some of the most extensive calibration settings I've ever seen on a TV.

And yet, they're not enough.


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