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HOME MOVIE THEATERS

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Joe Klusnick Posted: Nov 13, 2007 Published: Nov 14, 2007 5 comments

<I>For my first true home theater, I didn't mess around.</I>

Tony Reimer Posted: Aug 28, 2007 1 comments

Although it took a total of two years and six months of hard work, an equity line is what really helped me finish my theater. Home Theater magazine, Audio Video Interiors, and the Internet were my main sources of information. The room's dimensions are 13.5 by 19 by 8.33 feet, with a closet in the rear that houses the component rack. I gutted the room to the studs, even the ceiling, and installed a dedicated power circuit for audio, video, and lighting. I ran all the wiring for low voltage in the crawl space and for high voltage in the attic. Some crossing was unavoidable, but, at 90-degree angles, I've had no problems. To begin color selection, I started with the ceiling. I simulated the night sky with Ralph Lauren flat paint in magistrate black. I took a paint chip with me to the garment district in L.A. and found curtain fabric. With those colors to work with, I picked out the wall and trim paint and the carpet to match. I already had the black leather furniture.

James Robinson Posted: Aug 28, 2007 Published: Aug 29, 2007 2 comments

<I>From 30,000 feet to reality. </I>

Tom J. Slager, Homeowner Posted: Aug 28, 2007 1 comments

After several years of reading about the home theater experience, my family and I finally decided to convert some unused basement space into our own dedicated theater. Since I enjoy doing home-improvement projects, I chose to do most of the construction myself and to hire a reliable company to provide and integrate the audio/video components. I had constructed a small, built-in entertainment center a few years before in our home in Cincinnati, Ohio, but had never done a project as large as this.

Doug Christianson Posted: Sep 03, 2007 11 comments

<I>An electrical background and a passion for gear garnered this reader a great DIY theater. </I>

Charles Bloom Posted: Aug 28, 2007 Published: Aug 29, 2007 2 comments

<I>Everything I needed was online. </I>

Grant and Cathy Ovsak Posted: Oct 03, 2007 7 comments

<I>How we transformed our room from Brady Bunch shag to old-Hollywood glamour.</I>

Ruben Ortiz Posted: Oct 22, 2007 6 comments

<I>This homeowner takes DIY to another level.</I>

Bob Yazel, Homeowner Posted: Aug 22, 2007 0 comments

Our home theater started out as an unfinished basement room with dimensions of 14 by 18 by 9 feet. The room is rectangular, with three doors and no windows. Audio problems are inherently more difficult to solve than video problems. Fortunately, the room dimensions are friendly to acoustic resonances. Since the theater would be right under the great room of the house, the main goal was to decouple the theater from the rest of the house as best as possible.

Tim Kulin Posted: Oct 17, 2010 12 comments

I'm the owner of a small cabinet shop and decided to built this attractive and highly functional entertainment center in my home. All the woodworking throughout the room is mine (except for the chairs). It's all made from Alder that is finished in honey stain with a sable glaze. While it may look like wall paper, the wall treatment is a faux finish.

Mike Ellsworth Posted: Aug 30, 2011 0 comments
Photos by Kristine Crosby

When it came time to build a home theater in the basement of our home (14.5 by 18.5 feet), my wife set the tone by requesting a traditional movie theater décor with a touch of whimsy. On the technical side, I was most concerned about the installation and soundproofing to ensure it sounded as terrific as it looked. The walls, stage, and seating platform are all filled with insulation, and the walls are covered with sound panels, made from 1-inch-thick batting, and covered with velvet fabric and then framed with wood trim boxes. Molding added the extra bit of elegance, and pillars gave the room dimension and function. Doubling as sound panels, two of the pillars have cabinet doors. One of them opens to reveal the equipment rack; the other has shelves for storage.

Debbie Stampfli Posted: Jun 23, 2010 1 comments

With the latest crop of home theater seating, you may never want to leave home.
Usually, the first question that comes to mind when you walk into a home theater is, “Where do I sit?” No matter how clear the picture looks or how powerful the sound is, a bad chair or sofa can ruin your home theater experience. But new technology and innovative designs aren’t just for the latest consumer electronics. These fresh seating options offer style, comfort, and convenience. They provide a killer combination of looks and practicality that will make your home theater memorable—in a very good way.

Debbie Stampfli Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

Usually, the first question that comes to mind when you walk into a home theater is, “Where do I sit?” No matter how clear the picture looks or how powerful the sound is, a bad chair or sofa can ruin your home theater experience. But new technology and innovative design aren’t just for the latest consumer electronics. These fresh seating options offer style, comfort, and convenience. They provide a killer combination of looks and practicality that will make your home theater memorable—in a very good way.

Rob Sabin Posted: Mar 27, 2013 4 comments
Putting together a home theater can seem like a daunting task. So many pieces to think through and connect up! But if you care enough to do your homework and educate yourself, you’ll find it’s not as complicated as it looks. Here’s what goes into your typical viewing room.

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Kim Wilson Posted: Oct 09, 2013 0 comments
Photos Darin Cunningham

Out-of-the-box thinking among the homeowner, Donny Hackett Designs, and Jacob Abbott of Visual Concepts turned a less than appealing home theater into a magical masterpiece that can only be entered if you know the secret.

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