PLASMA TV REVIEWS

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Mike Wood Posted: Mar 05, 2003 Published: Mar 06, 2003 0 comments
Eight plasma displays go head to head.,

Yes, you heard right, kiddies. The plasma antichrist (me) is performing a comparison of eight mostly industrial-strength plasma displays. Will I deride them all? Probably. Will their beauteous splendor turn me to the dark side? Possibly. Will I lose my mind in the process? Read on to find out.

HT Staff Posted: May 28, 2004 Published: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments
Artison Portrait Speaker System and Velodyne DD-12 Subwoofer
Michael Berk Posted: May 12, 2011 0 comments

Bang & Olufsen's supremely luxurious entry into the 3D market, the updated 85" BeoVision 4-85, made its U.S. debut today.

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Joel Brinkley Posted: Nov 24, 2003 0 comments

Faroudja has long made among the very best video processors—the company virtually invented the industry. NEC has made outstanding plasma televisions for several years. Combining an NEC plasma that incorporates several important Faroudja enhancements with a top-of-the-line Faroudja processor and selling them as a package was an inspired idea that presented me with an intriguing product for review.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 24, 2006 Published: Oct 25, 2006 0 comments
Monocromaticness.

It's a fact of life that not all people can fit speakers into their living rooms. This could be for size reasons or, shall we say, more personal reasons. This fact has not gone unnoticed in the speaker world, which has been struggling for years with a declining market for big traditional speakers. In-walls have been a choice, but even the best in-walls have to make compromises that often end up being audible. On-walls are a newer choice that manufacturers hope will take out some of the concessions inherent in in-wall mountings. More recently, several companies have begun offering "sound bars" that give you multiple channels of sound from one long speaker that you can mount under your plasma or LCD. Leon is one such company that custom builds all of their speakers. Before they can build you one, though, you have to choose a plasma.

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Posted: May 24, 2006 0 comments

<UL CLASS="square">
<LI>$6,499</LI>
<LI>Technology: Plasma Display Panel</LI>
<LI>Resolution: 1366x768</LI>
<LI>Size: 50"</LI>
<LI>Inputs: One HDMI, two component, one each composite and S-video, one RGB on 15-Pin DSUB</LI>
<LI>Feature Highlights: CableCARD HD Tuner, AVM-II video processing, advanced color management,built-in speakers, tabletop stand</LI>
</UL>
Fujitsu plasmas cost more but have the enviable reputation for offering the kind of flexibility and improved processing that separates the premium designs from the loss leaders you see at Costco. This latest Fujitsu 50" plasma has a model number that's too long for me to repeat, but it costs $6499 and aims to justify its premium price.

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Peter Putman Posted: Oct 15, 2004 0 comments

If you've been following the plasma marketplace, you've surely figured out that there's a lot of product re-selling and "private labeling" these days. It's not unusual for five or more companies to be selling the same 42- or 50-inch plasma panel, albeit with different-colored trim plates and bezels. Some re-sellers even go so far as to put their own processing electronics inside, but these days, that's largely the exception to the rule. There's no end to the companies who are offering plasmas for sale, but only a handful of them actually make the things.

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David Birch-Jones Posted: Feb 10, 2008 0 comments
Editor's Note: this review was originally written and prepared for the March issue of Home Theater. However, just as we were going to press, Fujitsu announced it would be exiting the plasma display market as of, you guessed it, March. We pulled the review from that print issue, but have decided to publish it here since Fujitsu's remaining plasma inventory will be available while supplies last. According to statements by Fujitsu it will offer service and support for its plasma products for several years.

A solid performer, solidly in the high end.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jun 27, 2003 0 comments

"Remarkable things are happening in the plasma-display market . . . a big, flat screen hanging on the wall has universal appeal."

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 10, 2003 Published: Nov 01, 2003 0 comments
Fujitsu's new plasma is more than just a pretty face.

Ah, plasma. There's nothing sexier in the home theater world. Where else can you get a bright, sharp image without any box to speak of? It just hangs there on your wall and attracts attention like a supermodel walking into your local Denny's.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Feb 19, 2002 0 comments

Remarkable things are happening in the plasma-display market. Just the other day I saw one for sale in Costco for under $6000. Costco! While one might ponder the cosmic significance of plasma televisions at a warehouse retailer, there's no denying that these displays attract a lot of attention. A big, flat screen hanging on the wall has universal appeal.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 16, 2002 0 comments

Plasma displays are a hot ticket in today's video market, generating a nearly universal "Wow!" reaction from first-time viewers. Fujitsu's new 61-inch-diagonal PDS-6101 has a picture nearly as big as the largest rear-projection sets, but weighs less than half as much. Even better, like all plasmas, it takes up no floor space when hung on a wall. That feature alone has probably accounted for much of the technology's appeal, despite the still high price of admission. Yes, prices are dropping rapidly, but while some of the smallest sets are getting close to the target sought by most manufacturers&mdash;$100 per diagonal inch&mdash;larger screens are still a long way from that goal.

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Kevin Miller Posted: Feb 11, 2003 Published: Feb 12, 2003 0 comments
Gateway has thrown down the gauntlet in the budget-plasma arena.

Plasma panel prices continue to drop precipitously as the technology gets hotter and hotter. Gateway, provider of digital-technology solutions, has entered the home theater market with the GTW-P42M102 42-inch plasma panel, which has a native resolution of 852 by 480 in progressive-scan mode. It's a perfect example of plasma's ongoing price reduction. The streamlined display is 25.2 inches high, 40.8 inches wide, and a very slim 3.7 inches deep, and it weighs less than 70 pounds. The handsomely designed set sports a silver finish with a small, dark border surrounding the screen. The GTW-P42M102's performance characteristics are a mixed bag; however, at a list price of $2,999, there's no denying that it's the best value by a country mile in the 42-inch-plasma-panel category.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Dec 28, 2002 0 comments

Until recently, plasma display technology has been more of a conceptual thrill than anything most serious videophiles would relish making the centerpiece of a home theater. True, thin is sexy, and, as they say, you can never be too thin or too sexy. But gray and washed-out is not sexy. Nor is mediocre resolution, that glazed look plasma displays often exhibit, or the high price of admission.

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Joel Brinkley Posted: Dec 11, 2005 0 comments

Remember the day when plasma televisions were unadorned monitors? You had to connect it to a VCR to watch conventional television, and of course HDTV required another outboard tuner box. Any sound would have to come from your own sound system. Plasmas had no speakers or amplification of any kind. Just a screen and a picture. With no features to speak of, these plasmas had remote controls that offered four or five buttons, and that's all. And for that you paid $8,000 or more.

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