Marantz SR7010 A/V Receiver Review Specs

COMMENTS
Warrior24_7's picture

The ESS Sabre 9016 DAC in Yamaha and Pioneer recievers and processors like the CX-5100 are superior to those in the Marantz.

tboe77's picture

I just read your review of the Marantz SR7010 receiver. I was particularly intrigued by your described usage of the Klipsch RP-140SA Atmos speakers. I am writing today to ask you about using them along with the Paradigm speakers that you also have in your system.

I run a 5.1 channel system, with the 5 main channels all consisting of Paradigm Reference Studio Series (version 4) speakers. The main L/R are Studio 40s, the centre is a CC-690, and the surrounds are a pair of Studio 20s.

Can you please tell me more about your placement of the Klipsch speakers? In photos, it looks like they are intended to be placed on top of the main L/R and surround L/R speakers. It also looks like they are meant to be placed on a flat surface and, as we both know, the Paradigm Studio speakers' cabinets have curved tops. I thought this would preclude proper placement of Atmos modules, like the Klipsch RP-140SAs. Do you have them sitting on top of your Studio 20s? If so, did you have to do anything special to place them securely? Does the "hump" on the top, front side of the speaker, above the tweeter, affect the angle of the Atmos speaker, if placed on top of the Studio speaker? If so, did you do anything to correct this?

If you do not have the Atmos speakers placed on top of your Studio 20's, how and where do you have them placed? On separate stands?

In either case, would it be possible for you to share some pictures of your setup?

Also, can you comment on the sound quality of the Klipsch speakers, and how well they blend with the Paradigms?

I'm not very handy, so I haven't seriously considered installing in-ceiling speakers for Atmos. As I mentioned before, I thought the shape of the Studio speakers' cabinets would preclude proper placement of Atmos modules, like these Klipsch units. These perceived limitations had me thinking that an upgrade to an Atmos capable system would have to wait until I could afford to purchase all new speakers, but your article has given me hope that there may be an easier, less costly option, without sacrificing too much sound quality.

I know I'm asking for a lot of information, but if you could spare a few minutes to share what you've learned about the Klipsch Atmos speakers, it could have a big impact on my planned upgrade path.

Thank you very much for your time and consideration. I always enjoy reading your articles. Please keep them coming!

Sincerely,

Trevor

Mark Fleischmann's picture
I'll be doing a review of the Klipsch/Paradigm combo if you can wait a few months. In the meantime, here are a few things: The Klipsches are resting on top of the Paradigms. The back rubber feet rest on the speaker. The front rubber feet are slightly too short, so the Paradigm's hump supports the front. I may use some kind of putty to raise the back (slightly changing the Klipsch's angle of fire) and to damp the meeting of the two hard surfaces in front, but for now, the Klipsch is just resting on the Paradigm, and it's secure enough (no toddlers here). The Klipsches have a very detailed sound, probably with a more prominent treble than the neutral Paradigms, though we have not measured them yet, so don't take that for gospel. This makes Atmos effects more prominent, which I find helpful, though some future height-aggressive movie soundtrack might change my mind someday. I'm also avoiding ceiling-mount speakers, much as I would love to have them, because I'm a renter and the drilling would violate my lease. More details when I review the Klipsches. Thanks for your curiosity and I hope this will help for now.
tboe77's picture

That helps a lot, Mark! Thank you. I look forward to your review of the Klipsch speakers.

trinhlam365's picture

I'm not very handy, so I haven't seriously considered installing in-ceiling speakers for Atmos. As I mentioned before, I thought the shape of the Studio speakers' cabinets would preclude proper placement of Atmos modules, like these Klipsch units. These perceived limitations had me thinking that an upgrade to an Atmos capable system would have to wait until I could afford to purchase all new speakers, but your article has given me hope that there may be an easier, less costly option, without sacrificing too much sound quality.
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Michael O'Dea's picture

Hi Mark,
Thanks for your detailed review of the Marantz SR7010.
Could you please post the full test bench results for this unit so that an objective comparison can be made with the other av receivers you have reviewed.
Also, I was wondering whether you got a chance to test or use the phono input on this receiver?
If so, is the phono stage worth using or would you be better off using a separate phono pre-amp?
I'm considering purchasing this amp but am concerned about the low phono s/n ratio of 74 dB quoted in the manual. For comparison, here are the phono s/n ratio numbers for the main contenders:
Denon AVR-X6200 - 74 dB
Yamaha RX-A3050 - 95 dB
Sony STR-DA5800ES - 90 dB
Onkyo TX-RZ900 -80 dB
I know that there are other factors that affect the sound quality of the phono stage but these figures are concerning to me.
I wish to use the av receiver predominantly for music but want the functionality of an av receiver over a 2 channel amp. Any thoughts?

With thanks and best wishes.
Michael

Pages

Marantz SR7010 A/V Receiver Review Page 2

COMMENTS
Warrior24_7's picture

The ESS Sabre 9016 DAC in Yamaha and Pioneer recievers and processors like the CX-5100 are superior to those in the Marantz.

tboe77's picture

I just read your review of the Marantz SR7010 receiver. I was particularly intrigued by your described usage of the Klipsch RP-140SA Atmos speakers. I am writing today to ask you about using them along with the Paradigm speakers that you also have in your system.

I run a 5.1 channel system, with the 5 main channels all consisting of Paradigm Reference Studio Series (version 4) speakers. The main L/R are Studio 40s, the centre is a CC-690, and the surrounds are a pair of Studio 20s.

Can you please tell me more about your placement of the Klipsch speakers? In photos, it looks like they are intended to be placed on top of the main L/R and surround L/R speakers. It also looks like they are meant to be placed on a flat surface and, as we both know, the Paradigm Studio speakers' cabinets have curved tops. I thought this would preclude proper placement of Atmos modules, like the Klipsch RP-140SAs. Do you have them sitting on top of your Studio 20s? If so, did you have to do anything special to place them securely? Does the "hump" on the top, front side of the speaker, above the tweeter, affect the angle of the Atmos speaker, if placed on top of the Studio speaker? If so, did you do anything to correct this?

If you do not have the Atmos speakers placed on top of your Studio 20's, how and where do you have them placed? On separate stands?

In either case, would it be possible for you to share some pictures of your setup?

Also, can you comment on the sound quality of the Klipsch speakers, and how well they blend with the Paradigms?

I'm not very handy, so I haven't seriously considered installing in-ceiling speakers for Atmos. As I mentioned before, I thought the shape of the Studio speakers' cabinets would preclude proper placement of Atmos modules, like these Klipsch units. These perceived limitations had me thinking that an upgrade to an Atmos capable system would have to wait until I could afford to purchase all new speakers, but your article has given me hope that there may be an easier, less costly option, without sacrificing too much sound quality.

I know I'm asking for a lot of information, but if you could spare a few minutes to share what you've learned about the Klipsch Atmos speakers, it could have a big impact on my planned upgrade path.

Thank you very much for your time and consideration. I always enjoy reading your articles. Please keep them coming!

Sincerely,

Trevor

Mark Fleischmann's picture
I'll be doing a review of the Klipsch/Paradigm combo if you can wait a few months. In the meantime, here are a few things: The Klipsches are resting on top of the Paradigms. The back rubber feet rest on the speaker. The front rubber feet are slightly too short, so the Paradigm's hump supports the front. I may use some kind of putty to raise the back (slightly changing the Klipsch's angle of fire) and to damp the meeting of the two hard surfaces in front, but for now, the Klipsch is just resting on the Paradigm, and it's secure enough (no toddlers here). The Klipsches have a very detailed sound, probably with a more prominent treble than the neutral Paradigms, though we have not measured them yet, so don't take that for gospel. This makes Atmos effects more prominent, which I find helpful, though some future height-aggressive movie soundtrack might change my mind someday. I'm also avoiding ceiling-mount speakers, much as I would love to have them, because I'm a renter and the drilling would violate my lease. More details when I review the Klipsches. Thanks for your curiosity and I hope this will help for now.
tboe77's picture

That helps a lot, Mark! Thank you. I look forward to your review of the Klipsch speakers.

trinhlam365's picture

I'm not very handy, so I haven't seriously considered installing in-ceiling speakers for Atmos. As I mentioned before, I thought the shape of the Studio speakers' cabinets would preclude proper placement of Atmos modules, like these Klipsch units. These perceived limitations had me thinking that an upgrade to an Atmos capable system would have to wait until I could afford to purchase all new speakers, but your article has given me hope that there may be an easier, less costly option, without sacrificing too much sound quality.
Ra mat game than dao online

Michael O'Dea's picture

Hi Mark,
Thanks for your detailed review of the Marantz SR7010.
Could you please post the full test bench results for this unit so that an objective comparison can be made with the other av receivers you have reviewed.
Also, I was wondering whether you got a chance to test or use the phono input on this receiver?
If so, is the phono stage worth using or would you be better off using a separate phono pre-amp?
I'm considering purchasing this amp but am concerned about the low phono s/n ratio of 74 dB quoted in the manual. For comparison, here are the phono s/n ratio numbers for the main contenders:
Denon AVR-X6200 - 74 dB
Yamaha RX-A3050 - 95 dB
Sony STR-DA5800ES - 90 dB
Onkyo TX-RZ900 -80 dB
I know that there are other factors that affect the sound quality of the phono stage but these figures are concerning to me.
I wish to use the av receiver predominantly for music but want the functionality of an av receiver over a 2 channel amp. Any thoughts?

With thanks and best wishes.
Michael

Pages

Marantz SR7010 A/V Receiver Review


Audio Performance
Video Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $2,199

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Nine amp channels
Atmos-ready, upgradable for DTS:X, Auro-3D
Audyssey MultEQ XT32 room correction
Minus
USB jack not PC compatible

THE VERDICT
The Marantz SR7010 has nine amp channels, Dolby Atmos decoding, DTS:X upgradability, and even Auro-3D upgradability, making it as future-proof as a receiver can currently be.

The Marantz SR7010 is the fifth Dolby Atmos receiver I’ve reviewed. However, to be frank, it’s only the second one that matters to me. Most of the Atmos receivers occupying my rack’s guest berth have been seven-channel models limited to 5.1.2-channel Atmos, with just a single pair of height channels in the front. Only the nine-channel Pioneer Elite SC-89 and this Marantz have provided what I deem the minimum acceptable Atmos experience utilizing 5.1.4 channels, with height channels in both front and back.

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