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What's in a Misnomer? A Look at a Few CE Classics

What's in a name? At times, not a whole lot of sense. The consumer electronics industry has a genius for giving dopey names to things: unintentionally misleading names, deliberately misleading names, duplicative names, redundant names, outright laughable names. Here are just a few:

Poll Recap: Disc-Based Viewing Key for Half of Respondents

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Sony STR-DN1060 A/V Receiver Review Wrap Up

COMMENTS
Fitzkirk's picture

"What I call the triple-threat..."

Threat: "a statement of an intention to inflict pain, injury, damage, or other hostile action on someone in retribution for something done or not done."

TREAT: an event or item that is out of the ordinary and gives great pleasure.

Having Wi-Fi, AirPlay, and Bluetooth would be a triple *treat*, as in the ice-cream, three flavors of goodness.

Having a triple *threat* receiver would make no sense. Every story you spell it this way. Why? What am I missing?

Now if you will excuse me I have to go shout at some clouds.

Mark Fleischmann's picture
Our readers are the greatest!
Fitzkirk's picture

Unless you are pronouncing "threat" as "threet", which is pretty fricking weird if you as me. And triple three would be 3 x 3 = 9 which also makes no sense. I await your response with great interest.

Mark Fleischmann's picture
Really, our readers are the greatest!
TimmyS's picture

Hey are all of your multi channel tests at one frequency or 20-20k full band? can you elucidate?

Rob Sabin's picture
Our audio technical editor Mark Peterson wrote a superb and detailed write-up explaining our audio test procedures a while back, which you can find here.

Here's an excerpt from the section describing the amplifier power test:

"Total harmonic distortion versus amplitude completes the set of tests. We quote power output at 0.1 percent and 1.0 percent distortion levels and measure with the left and right channels driving 8-ohm and then 4-ohm loads. For multichannel amps, we typically measure five channels driving 8-ohm loads and seven channels driving 8-ohm loads. All of these tests utilize continuous, in-phase, 1-kHz sine waves as a stimulus. Line voltage is adjusted to be no lower than 120 volts RMS at maximum amplifier power output."

Pages

Sony STR-DN1060 A/V Receiver Review Test Bench

COMMENTS
Fitzkirk's picture

"What I call the triple-threat..."

Threat: "a statement of an intention to inflict pain, injury, damage, or other hostile action on someone in retribution for something done or not done."

TREAT: an event or item that is out of the ordinary and gives great pleasure.

Having Wi-Fi, AirPlay, and Bluetooth would be a triple *treat*, as in the ice-cream, three flavors of goodness.

Having a triple *threat* receiver would make no sense. Every story you spell it this way. Why? What am I missing?

Now if you will excuse me I have to go shout at some clouds.

Mark Fleischmann's picture
Our readers are the greatest!
Fitzkirk's picture

Unless you are pronouncing "threat" as "threet", which is pretty fricking weird if you as me. And triple three would be 3 x 3 = 9 which also makes no sense. I await your response with great interest.

Mark Fleischmann's picture
Really, our readers are the greatest!
TimmyS's picture

Hey are all of your multi channel tests at one frequency or 20-20k full band? can you elucidate?

Rob Sabin's picture
Our audio technical editor Mark Peterson wrote a superb and detailed write-up explaining our audio test procedures a while back, which you can find here.

Here's an excerpt from the section describing the amplifier power test:

"Total harmonic distortion versus amplitude completes the set of tests. We quote power output at 0.1 percent and 1.0 percent distortion levels and measure with the left and right channels driving 8-ohm and then 4-ohm loads. For multichannel amps, we typically measure five channels driving 8-ohm loads and seven channels driving 8-ohm loads. All of these tests utilize continuous, in-phase, 1-kHz sine waves as a stimulus. Line voltage is adjusted to be no lower than 120 volts RMS at maximum amplifier power output."

Pages

Sony STR-DN1060 A/V Receiver Review Specs

COMMENTS
Fitzkirk's picture

"What I call the triple-threat..."

Threat: "a statement of an intention to inflict pain, injury, damage, or other hostile action on someone in retribution for something done or not done."

TREAT: an event or item that is out of the ordinary and gives great pleasure.

Having Wi-Fi, AirPlay, and Bluetooth would be a triple *treat*, as in the ice-cream, three flavors of goodness.

Having a triple *threat* receiver would make no sense. Every story you spell it this way. Why? What am I missing?

Now if you will excuse me I have to go shout at some clouds.

Mark Fleischmann's picture
Our readers are the greatest!
Fitzkirk's picture

Unless you are pronouncing "threat" as "threet", which is pretty fricking weird if you as me. And triple three would be 3 x 3 = 9 which also makes no sense. I await your response with great interest.

Mark Fleischmann's picture
Really, our readers are the greatest!
TimmyS's picture

Hey are all of your multi channel tests at one frequency or 20-20k full band? can you elucidate?

Rob Sabin's picture
Our audio technical editor Mark Peterson wrote a superb and detailed write-up explaining our audio test procedures a while back, which you can find here.

Here's an excerpt from the section describing the amplifier power test:

"Total harmonic distortion versus amplitude completes the set of tests. We quote power output at 0.1 percent and 1.0 percent distortion levels and measure with the left and right channels driving 8-ohm and then 4-ohm loads. For multichannel amps, we typically measure five channels driving 8-ohm loads and seven channels driving 8-ohm loads. All of these tests utilize continuous, in-phase, 1-kHz sine waves as a stimulus. Line voltage is adjusted to be no lower than 120 volts RMS at maximum amplifier power output."

Pages

Sony STR-DN1060 A/V Receiver Review Page 2

COMMENTS
Fitzkirk's picture

"What I call the triple-threat..."

Threat: "a statement of an intention to inflict pain, injury, damage, or other hostile action on someone in retribution for something done or not done."

TREAT: an event or item that is out of the ordinary and gives great pleasure.

Having Wi-Fi, AirPlay, and Bluetooth would be a triple *treat*, as in the ice-cream, three flavors of goodness.

Having a triple *threat* receiver would make no sense. Every story you spell it this way. Why? What am I missing?

Now if you will excuse me I have to go shout at some clouds.

Mark Fleischmann's picture
Our readers are the greatest!
Fitzkirk's picture

Unless you are pronouncing "threat" as "threet", which is pretty fricking weird if you as me. And triple three would be 3 x 3 = 9 which also makes no sense. I await your response with great interest.

Mark Fleischmann's picture
Really, our readers are the greatest!
TimmyS's picture

Hey are all of your multi channel tests at one frequency or 20-20k full band? can you elucidate?

Rob Sabin's picture
Our audio technical editor Mark Peterson wrote a superb and detailed write-up explaining our audio test procedures a while back, which you can find here.

Here's an excerpt from the section describing the amplifier power test:

"Total harmonic distortion versus amplitude completes the set of tests. We quote power output at 0.1 percent and 1.0 percent distortion levels and measure with the left and right channels driving 8-ohm and then 4-ohm loads. For multichannel amps, we typically measure five channels driving 8-ohm loads and seven channels driving 8-ohm loads. All of these tests utilize continuous, in-phase, 1-kHz sine waves as a stimulus. Line voltage is adjusted to be no lower than 120 volts RMS at maximum amplifier power output."

Pages

Sony STR-DN1060 A/V Receiver Review


Audio Performance
Video Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
PRICE $600

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Wi-Fi, AirPlay, Bluetooth
MHL on front and rear
Google Cast, Spotify Connect
Minus
Confusing A.F.D., HD-D.C.S. terminology

THE VERDICT
If you can do without Dolby Atmos in this seven-channel AVR, Sony’s well-thought-out wireless functionality and sweet, golden sound are an unbeatable combination.

Let me say this up front: The Sony STR-DN1060 doesn’t do Dolby Atmos. Whether this is a serious omission in a seven-channel receiver today is debatable—but I’d say not. Most of the first-generation Atmos receivers have shortcomings of their own. For one thing, they lack the forthcoming DTS:X, the other flavor of object-oriented, height-enabled surround sound. More critically, seven-channel models can offer only Atmos 5.1.2, with two height channels in front or directly above the listener but none in back. That is at best a limited version of the Atmos experience because it doesn’t create the full dome-shaped soundfield of 5.1.4.

Pages

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