LATEST ADDITIONS

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Barry Willis Posted: Jun 15, 2003 0 comments

Personal video recorders(PVRs)—or digital video recorders (DVRs), as they are sometimes called—may not be as inevitable in most consumers' homes as some experts are predicting. The reasons? Try invasion of privacy and deletion of desirable features.

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Posted: Jun 15, 2003 0 comments

This week, Pete Putman sets up the <A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com/showarchives.cgi?125">Marantz VP-1252 DLP projector</A> and gives it a complete examination. PP remarks that the Marantz "did some things well, and others things not so well."

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Barry Willis Posted: Jun 15, 2003 0 comments

Several new developments in early June promise to boost the market penetration of high-definition television.

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Dan Yakir Posted: Jun 14, 2003 0 comments

<I>The Man in the White Suit</I> <BR> <I>The Lavender Hill Mob</I> <BR> <I>The Ladykillers </I> (Aspect ratio: 1.66:1. Color.) <BR> <I>Kind Hearts and Coronets</I> <BR> <I>The Captain's Paradise</I>

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jun 13, 2003 0 comments

Like three-button suits, ribbon drivers seem to go in and out of fashion arbitrarily. But there's a pattern. First, they're all the rage for their airy, transparent, detailed sound. Then they're shunned because of inherent technical limitations or their low impedances (which present a difficult load for an amplifier to drive). Or because of the complexities involved in getting them to mate with the traditional cone drivers typically used to produce low frequencies. Or because new materials and technologies have improved the performance of cone and dome drivers, which, being easier to manufacture and use, make ribbons' theoretical advantages not worth the hassle. Then there's a breakthrough in ribbon design and the cycle repeats.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jun 13, 2003 0 comments

<I>Voices of Daveigh Chase, Jason Marsden, Suzanne Pleshette, Michael Chiklis, Lauren Holly, John Ratzenberger, Susan Egan, David Ogden Stiers. Directed by Hayao Miyazaki. Aspect ratio: 1.85:1 (anamorphic). Dolby Digital 5.1 (English, Japanese, French, Spanish). Two discs. 132 minutes. 2001. Walt Disney Home Video 04784. PG. $29.99.</I>

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HT Staff Posted: Jun 12, 2003 0 comments
Tannoy
Tannoy developed the Wideband SuperTweeter titanium-dome tweeter to take advantage of high-resolution audio. According to the company, the Wideband SuperTweeter works with SACD and DVD-Audio players to produce frequencies above 20 kilohertz. Well, the Wideband SuperTweeter is making an appearance in Tannoy's new line of Sensys loudspeakers. The Sensys range includes a tower speaker, a bookshelf model, a dedicated surround speaker, and the Sensys C center-channel speaker shown here, which features two 6-inch midrange drivers in addition to the Wideband SuperTweeter. The Sensys speakers are currently available in a black-ash or a maple finish (Tannoy plans to make them available in a rosewood finish, as well), and they range in price from a reasonable $250 to $500 each.
Tannoy
(519) 745-1158
www.tannoy.com
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HT Staff Posted: Jun 12, 2003 0 comments
DVD: Just Married—20th Century Fox
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Ashton Kutcher (That '70s Show, Dude, Where's My Car?) and Brittany Murphy (King of the Hill, 8 Mile) play newlyweds who discover that they truly hate each other while they're on their honeymoon. Just Married doesn't exactly break new ground, but it's quite funny and entertaining, mostly due to the onscreen chemistry and charisma that the two stars imbue. Obviously not much of a thinker, it's at least fun. While you're watching, keep in mind that Kutcher does all of his own stunts.
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Michael Gaughn Posted: Jun 10, 2003 0 comments

We went to four programmers from XM and four from Sirius and asked them the same question: With listeners able to choose between things like CD megachangers, digital music servers, DVD music videos, and traditional radio, what does satellite radio have to offer?

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Michael Gaughn Posted: Jun 10, 2003 0 comments
Illustrations by Eric Yang Pretty much all you need to know about satellite radio can be summed up in one paragraph. There are two services, Sirius and XM. XM offers 101 channels, with 71 of them devoted to music, and the rest to news and talk. Sirius has 100 channels (or "streams," as it calls them), 60 of them music-only.

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