LATEST ADDITIONS

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Ultimate AV Staff Posted: Nov 22, 2004 0 comments

In refusing to play ball in contract renewal negotiations with Pixar Animation Studios, Walt Disney Company probably sabotaged what could have been a very profitable long-term relationship.

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Barry Willis Posted: Nov 22, 2004 0 comments

At present, high-definition video is available two ways: via broadcasters or on HD digital VHS tape cassettes. There are no high-def DVDs, despite the hype from the promoters of Blu-ray and HD-DVD, both of which will require disc transports using short-wavelength blue lasers.

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Ultimate AV Staff Posted: Nov 22, 2004 0 comments

Plenty of television gets watched on Thanksgiving Day—from Disney classics to nonstop college football. Until recently, not much of it was in high-definition.

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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Nov 22, 2004 0 comments
I've written enthusiastically in the past about the SENSIO 3D video processing system. 3D - at least in its current technological incarnation - isn't the type of thing that lends itself to casual TV viewing (i.e., news, sitcoms, and exercise videos - although the faceurs at "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" probably have the right sensibility to make great comedic use of it). When done right with appropriate subject matter, on the other hand, it's like having a thrill ride in the middle of your living room. But as amazing as the SENSIO 3D system is, it's little more than a sideshow wonder without a good base of 3D software to maintain your interest.
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Darryl Wilkinson Posted: Nov 21, 2004 Published: Nov 22, 2004 0 comments
Why do the Japanese get all the good stuff first? Godzilla destroyed Tokyo (1954) a full 44 years before he was unleashed on New York (1998). (And the original was much better than the schlock Hollywood tried to foist on us as a "modern" version.) Not to mention they've got gobs more camera phones than we do. And now, Sharp - part of the global powerhouse of top-shelf consumer electronics companies plugging the Blu-ray Disc format - is introducing a new Blu-ray Disc recorder that includes a built-in hard drive and a standard DVD recorder. The new gizmo is claimed by Sharp to be the first high-definition recorder in the world to combine three recording disc drives.
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Chris Chiarella Posted: Nov 19, 2004 0 comments
I've spewed countless compliments upon this movie, or more accurately the DVD, in the print magazine over the past year, and like a good consumer my fondness eventually gives rise to the question, "What else can I BUY?" Not all of my favorite movies have Star Wars in the title, and some (Die Hard, The Hunt for Red October) have yielded precious little tie-in merchandise, and so when an unusual product like the Old Century Master and Commander game is released, I am compelled to take note.
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HT Staff Posted: Nov 18, 2004 0 comments
soundmatters
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HT Staff Posted: Nov 18, 2004 0 comments
DVD: Elf—New Line
Video: 5
Audio: 5
Extras: 5
Elf is 10 feet tall. Thoroughly entertaining, Will Ferrell's breakout film is now available on two DVDs that are fun, pure and simple. Ferrell plays Buddy, who accidentally ends up in Santa's North Pole Workshop and is raised by the elves, never being told he's really human. . .even though he's 3 feet taller than everyone else. Yearning to find his real father, Buddy heads to New York to do so.
Rich Warren Posted: Nov 16, 2004 0 comments

Normally, speakers don't jazz me out of the box - I gotta hear them first. But Canton 's CD 300 speaker system, which combines technology from the company's high-end Karat series with the sleek design of its smaller CD 100 model, primed the adrenaline pump even before I connected the speakers to my receiver.

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Chris Chiarella Posted: Nov 12, 2004 0 comments
Two years ago I had the immense pleasure of reviewing Logitech first 5.1-channel speaker package with Dolby Digital and DTS decoding, their flagship Z-680, in the January 2003 issue. While maintaining the $400 price point and those 500 tremendous watts—enough to truly transcend the computer and invade into the home theater—Logitech has introduced a successor, the Z-5500 Digital.

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