LATEST ADDITIONS

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments
A Combi for Everyone

It's finally happened. No longer does the desire for high-resolution audio mean that you must decide between two formats or max out your credit card on one of the high-end combi units. With the DV-563A, Pioneer has released a DVD player that not only offers progressive scanning and multichannel SACD and DVD-Audio playback, but it costs only slightly more than an entry-level DVD player. The difference in price is so slight that anyone looking for a DVD player would be insane not to look at the DV-563A. Keep reading because, believe it or not, the review's not over.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments
Bigger than a direct-view, smaller than a big-screen, Tabletop TVs offer an almost perfect balance between two sides of the TV world. On one side of that world, you have the direct-view TV's small footprint and commensurate aesthetic niceties. However, with a maximum 40-inch-diagonal screen size (38-inch for 16:9 models), these sets aren't very big. On the other side, you've got big-screen rear-projection TVs, which offer a much bigger image at the expense of a much bigger footprint on your carpet. Until recently, almost all RPTVs were quite an eyesore. Even now, no matter how nice an RPTV may look, it's still a huge box taking up real estate in your living room. On the other hand, tabletop TVs like the CRT-based Toshiba 46HX83 offer a far more-pleasing aesthetic and larger screen sizes than are available in the direct-view category.
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Steve Guttenberg Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments
Tune Your Room. Atlantic Technology's new speaker system will do just that.

If there's one evergreen audiophile fantasy, it's the perfect speaker. I know lots of guys who obsess about this sort of thing, but I always remind them that, even if they had a home theater packed with perfect beauties, they still wouldn't attain audio nirvana. The perfect speakers would be confronted by the realities of a very imperfect room—its standing waves, peaks, dips, image-smearing reflections, and reverberations would conspire to muck up the sound.

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Peter Putman Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments
"Oh what a beautiful morning, oh what a beautiful day! Monday Night Football's in HD, everything's going my way. . ." (With apologies to Rodgers and Hammerstein.)
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Posted: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments

Barry Willis sorts out the plusses and minuses fo the <A HREF="/surroundsoundpreampprocessors/1003parasound">Parasound Halo C 2 and Halo A 51 surround processor & 5-channel power amplifier</A>. BW notes, "Five years in development, the company's Halo C2 surround processor is a brilliantly executed piece of technology."

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Steven Hirsch Posted: Nov 30, 2003 0 comments

My father always attributed his early interests in technical matters to his maternal grandfather, who, in his words, "knew a little bit about everything." In those days, the lowly telephone was not commonplace in rural America, international calling was an exotic luxury for the wealthy, and the Internet was the stuff of pulp science-fiction novels.

Josef Krebs Posted: Nov 30, 2003 0 comments

Hey, we're not making this up as we go. We're on a crusade to unearth the best box sets of the holiday season. And here they are - not in any particular order, but simply the ten coolest treasures on DVD and CD. Is your friend's home theater starting to seem like a temple of gloom? Do you and your girl keep going out on, shall we say, bad dates?

Barry Willis Posted: Nov 30, 2003 0 comments

In my student days, I coped with perpetual financial shortfalls in part by moving furniture. After a weekend of toting hide-a-beds and refrigerators to fifth-floor walkups, I would imagine a perfect world in which everything was designed to work with everything else. Not a world of bureaucratic regimentation, but one in which, by common agreement, every sofa would fit into every elevator and every table would slip through every open door.

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Robert Deutsch Posted: Nov 30, 2003 0 comments

<I>Fred Astaire, Cyd Charisse, Janis Paige. Directed by Rouben Mamoulian. Aspect ratio: 2.35:1 (anamorphic). Dolby Digital 5.1 (English), 1.0 (French). 117 minutes. 1957. Warner Home Video 62251. NR. $19.90.</I>

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Nov 28, 2003 0 comments

<I>Aspect ratio: 2.35:1 (anamorphic). Dolby Surround (French), Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround, DTS 5.1 Surround (English). Two discs. Miramax Home Entertainment 24017. R. $29.99.</I>

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