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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Dec 15, 2003 0 comments

Visit the Sonus Faber website and you're given the softest of soft sells. The home page has birds flying lazily overhead while wheat sways gently in the breeze. Quiet classical music hums in the background. Click in the right place and you might find a few words about products, but you won't learn that Sonus Faber is the best-known Italian speaker manufacturer west of . . . Cremona.

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Posted: Dec 15, 2003 0 comments

Toshiba and NEC have emerged victorious from a prolonged campaign to gain approval for their blue-laser-based high-definition optical disc system. Known as HD-DVD, the system was approved for read-only applications by the DVD Forum on December 8.

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Posted: Dec 15, 2003 0 comments

From the November 2003 issue, Thomas J. Norton scrutinizes the <A HREF="/speakersystems/1103sonus">Sonus Faber Cremona surround speaker system</A>, noting that although SF speakers are generally known as very expensive, the compnay "has followed a different strategy with the Cremona, making sure from the get-go that the speaker is home-theater friendly."

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Posted: Dec 15, 2003 0 comments

New York's Cablevision Systems Corporation is the latest cable provider to announce that it will begin offering set-top boxes with recording capability. The company plans to offer digital video recorders (DVRs) based on the TiVo, Inc. model, with a high-capacity hard-disk drive used to record dozens of hours of TV programming. Cablevision should begin offering its DVRs in spring 2004.

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HT Staff Posted: Dec 12, 2003 0 comments
URC
What could be better than a remote control that works up to 100 feet away? How about a remote that can send commands through walls and household structures and costs only $499? Universal Remote Control's Home Theater Master MX-800 does just that. Users can control all of their A/V equipment from one remote, regardless of where that equipment is located. The MX-800 sends commands to the included MRF-200 Base Station, which converts them to infrared signals to control the components. Using macros, you can program the MX-800 to operate up to 20 A/V units. It can create 900 macro buttons with 199 commands each. The LCD screen measures 1.4 by 2.1 inches and features text-editing capabilities.
Universal Remote Control
(914) 835-4484
www.universal-remote.com
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HT Staff Posted: Dec 12, 2003 0 comments
DVD: The Battle of Shaker Heights—Buena Vista
Video: 3
Audio: 3
Extras: 1
In The Battle of Shaker Heights, the second Project Greenlight movie, Shia LaBeouf plays Kelly Ernswiler, a 17-year-old kid who re-enacts WWII battle scenes in his spare time. At a battle re-enactment, he meets Bart Bowland. The two become fast friends, but things get messy when Kelly falls for Tabby, Bart's older, engaged sister. After watching the making-of on Project Greenlight, you expect an intensity level that's lacking in the final, edited version. Where is this "wonderful" script that everyone keeps talking about? Oh, that's right: It ended up on the cutting-room floor.
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HT Staff Posted: Dec 09, 2003 Published: Dec 10, 2003 0 comments
The buying public can't seem to get enough of new flat-panel televisions. The coming months should be good ones for manufacturers and retailers, according to a December 9 report from DisplaySearch, a research firm specializing in the flat-panel market.
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HT Staff Posted: Dec 09, 2003 Published: Dec 10, 2003 0 comments
Pioneer Electronics has introduced a new DVD recorder for the professional market that may find some crossover customers among serious video hobbyists.
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SV Staff Posted: Dec 09, 2003 0 comments
Samsung Joining forces, Samsung, DirecTV, and TiVo have created the SIR-S4120R video hard-disk recorder. Not only does it have a supersized 120-gigabyte (GB) hard drive that can hold up to 100 hours of shows but also dual DirecTV satellite tuners so you can record two shows at once or watch one while recording another.
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David Ranada Posted: Dec 08, 2003 0 comments
The introduction of the compact disc was the greatest single leap forward in the history of recorded audio after Edison's invention of the phonograph in 1877 and the introduction of electrical recording in the late 1920s. By 1983 the long-playing (LP) record had entered what the late Peter Mitchell, my prime audio mentor, aptly referred to as its Baroque period.

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