Denon AVR-1913 A/V Receiver HT Labs Measures

HT Labs Measures

Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 102.3 watts
1% distortion at 117.7 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 70.5 watts
1% distortion at 81.7 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 52.7 watts
1% distortion at 68.7 watts

Analog frequency response in Pure Direct mode:
–0.14 dB at 10 Hz
–0.03 dB at 20 Hz
–0.08 dB at 20 kHz
–2.98 dB at 50 kHz

Analog frequency response with signal processing:
–0.56 dB at 10 Hz
–0.17 dB at 20 Hz
–0.32 dB at 20 kHz
–18.88 dB at 50 kHz

This graph shows that the AVR-1913’s left channel, from CD input to speaker output with two channels driving 8-ohm loads, reaches 0.1 percent distortion at 102.3 watts and 1 percent distortion at 117.7 watts. Into 4 ohms, the amplifier reaches 0.1 percent distortion at 87.6 watts and 1 percent distortion at 151.1 watts.

There was no multichannel input to measure. THD+N from the CD input to the speaker output was less than 0.041 percent at 1 kilohertz when driving 2.83 volts into an 8-ohm load. Crosstalk at 1 kHz driving 2.83 volts into an 8-ohm load was –77.21 decibels left to right and –83.47 dB right to left. The signal-to-noise ratio with an 8-ohm load from 10 hertz to 24 kHz with “A” weighting was –108.33 dBrA.

From the Dolby Digital input to the loudspeaker output, the left channel measures –0.10 dB at 20 Hz and –0.28 dB at 20 kHz. The center channel measures –0.09 dB at 20 Hz and –0.31 dB at 20 kHz, and the left surround channel measures –0.09 dB at 20 Hz and –0.25 dB at 20 kHz. From the Dolby Digital input to the line-level output, the LFE channel is –0.01 dB at 20 Hz when referenced to the level at 40 Hz and reaches the upper 3-dB down point at 118 Hz and the upper 6-dB down point at 121 Hz.—MJP

Video Test Bench
I called the MA HD a fail, but in practice, it’s somewhere in that gray area between a clear pass and a clear fail. The rotating bar in the test image stays incredibly smooth well into the green region of the test, so on that alone I would call it a pass with flying colors. On either side of that rotating bar, though—about 10 lines of resolution on the leading edge and closer to 20 on the trailing edge—the background pattern devolves into a flickering mess, the likes of which I’ve rarely seen. I could find absolutely no instances in which this had any bearing on real-world programming material, but it’s curious nonetheless.—DB

COMPANY INFO
Denon
(201) 762-6665
ARTICLE CONTENTS
Share | |

X
Enter your Sound & Vision username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading
setting var node_statistics_99417