TECH2

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 09, 2012 0 comments

I have to admit, I didn't think I'd get into this game. I like my action games actiony, and my strategy games real-time. A turn-based action game? What kind of unholy chimera is that?

I never played the original X-COM (the 1994 version had a hyphen, and an incredible following), so the excitement surrounding this remake was lost on me.

Once I tried it, though. . . wow is it easy to get sucked in.

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Timothy J. Seppala Posted: Nov 06, 2012 0 comments

Master Chief always seemed like Heinlein's ideal of a soldier: You never felt like he needed to sleep - just give him his ten thousand–mile check-ups and dust him off occasionally. In the opening scenes of Halo 4, Spartan 117 goes from sleep to trigger in a few moments, but that's enough to begin his journey to becoming human again.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 01, 2012 0 comments

Hot on the heels of Apple’s latest iPad (and lukewarm on the heels of Amazon’s new Kindle Fires), Google announced new Nexus tablets in unsurprising sizes and price points.

As I’ve said before, hardware is largely irrelevant to the tablet market. Greater resolution or processing speed doesn’t help you get more content to download.

To that end, Google announced new licensing deals to bring more content to Play — and I have a chart to prove it.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Oct 31, 2012 0 comments

At the Rocky Mountain Audio Fest in Denver earlier this month, I must have visited at least 100 demo rooms and booths. But DEQX impressed me more than any of the scores of headphones, speakers, and electronics I heard.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 26, 2012 0 comments

Most modern TVs, tablets, and laptops have glossy screens. While these have benefits as far as image quality goes, they’re not great in bright environments. Hard reflections can make the actual content on the screens hard to see.

NuShield makes special removable films that aim to combat this problem.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Oct 24, 2012 0 comments

Every time I visit Vancouver vintage gear dealer Innovative Audio, I find it difficult to keep my mind focused on anything.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 19, 2012 0 comments

Technically, Planetside 2 isn't out yet (the full game launches November 20). So technically, this isn't a review. But I'm having so much fun playing it, I couldn't keep it to myself any longer.

The original Planetside was the first (and still only) MMOFPS. Battles raged, waged over entire continents, with hundreds of players locked in epic sci-fi skirmishes. It was glorious.

Then Sony ruined it. If the beta is any indication, this is one serious mea culpa.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Oct 17, 2012 0 comments

As I said in Monday’s coverage of headphones and Wednesday’s coverage of speakers, Denver’s Rocky Mountain Audio Fest is the biggest, most exciting, and most important of the regional hi-fi shows that have sprung up all over the U.S. and Canada.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Oct 17, 2012 0 comments

If you’re looking to hear the latest speakers, there’s no better place to go than Colorado’s Rocky Mountain Audio Fest. Last weekend’s show was packed with new speakers, ranging from bookshelf designs to huge towers, budget models to budget-busting models, and ordinary to exotic.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 12, 2012 0 comments

The latest in the seemingly endless supply of add-on packs for Battlefield 3 is Armored Kill. The title is apt. There’re lots of tanks, airplanes, helicopters, airborne gunships, and massive, massive maps.

I wasn’t planning on covering yet another BF3 add-on, but the original game is one of my favorites of recent years and AK just isn’t. . . fun.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 08, 2012 0 comments

I’m a big fan of the Kindle Fire. So much so, I actually bought one. In article after article, I’ve extolled its virtues. There’s no question the iPad is the best tablet, but the Fire isn’t a tablet per se. It’s a content enjoyment device (CED?).

Surprising absolutely no one, Amazon has released an updated version with a higher resolution screen, some tweaks, and a bit more polish than the original Fire.

Worth an upgrade? Or at least a look?

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 05, 2012 0 comments

It started with Guild Wars 2: Random crashes, seemingly unconnected. Then it spread to other games. After a few hours with Black Mesa, a crash to the desktop. Occasionally, the dreaded BSOD (Blue Screen of Death).

No amount of driver updates fixed the issue. On the GW 2 tech forums the problem seemed widespread. When an Arena Net employee would bother to respond to one of the many threads about the same issue, they always just said, "Check your RAM."

Yeah, right. In 20 years of fixing and building computers, not once had I ever had a problem with RAM.

So what could it be?

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Oct 03, 2012 1 comments

Room correction systems that optimize your audio system for the acoustics of your room have been around for more than a decade — but frankly, they’ve never won me over, and I’m finally starting to understand why.

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Brent Butterworth Posted: Oct 01, 2012 0 comments

With so many audio connection technologies available now, it's gotta be tough to be an audio product manager. Smartphone fans want to connect via Bluetooth. iTunes enthusiasts want AirPlay. Computer audio nuts expect a USB connection. A few old-schoolers demand a hardware dock for an iPod. And there's that one guy who still owns a Zune and needs an analog input.

What to do? If you're Samsung and you're trying to make a "statement" product, you throw it all in. The $699 DA-E750 includes all of the above technologies - plus DLNA, plus a fold-out "dual dock" that works with Samsung Galaxy phones as well as iPhones, iPads, and iPods.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Sep 28, 2012 0 comments

Reverence. That is what I, and most gamers, feel towards Half-Life. Released in 1998, it was revolutionary. More importantly, it was fun.

Playing now, though, is nearly impossible. Not because of any technological limitations (it was ported to Steam), but because the 14-year-old graphics make you want to weep.

At least they have until now.

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