PROJECTOR REVIEWS

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

I've had a soft spot for BenQ projectors since I reviewed its <A HREF=" http://ultimateavmag.com/videoprojectors/604benq/ ">PE8700</A> back in 2004. It was the first DLP projector that I felt truly demonstrated the potential of the technology to dominate the video projector market. While DLP has since faced serious competition from LCD and LCoS in both performance and price, it still does more than hold its own.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Apr 15, 2007 Published: Mar 26, 2007 0 comments
What 1080p was made for.

Despite my, and others', repeated assurances that you don't need 1080p on a 42-inch display, that seems to be what people keep concentrating on. Such resolution is wasted on a small screen (unless you're sitting on it). But, in this "mine has more resolution than yours" world, I guess such competitive behavior is inevitable. So, what about the displays that can take advantage of 1080p? Sure, depending on where you're sitting, an RPTV can do so. But, with all the concessions to price, brightness, and market competition, you still won't be getting everything out of the signal. There are a few flat panels that would work. In a size that would let you see 1080p from any distance, though, you'd be looking at the price of a good Mercedes. So, that leaves front projection.

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Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Apr 10, 2007 Published: Mar 11, 2007 0 comments
Keeping up with the Joneses.

It is not too surprising that ViewSonic has decided to make a push into the home theater projection market. The company has a healthy lineup of business projectors and has watched other projector manufacturers successfully transition over to the HT side. But is anyone else surprised that a company known primarily for LCD TVs and monitors would go with DLP for their new line of home theater projectors? Maybe it's just me.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Mar 25, 2007 0 comments

The introduction of a 1080p projector for less than $5,000 would have been big news early last year. While that field is now getting increasingly crowded, with projectors from Sony, Mitsubishi, and JVC muscling in on the action, it's still big news&mdash;news that now includes the new PT-AE1000U from Panasonic.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Mar 09, 2007 0 comments

In the past few months we've seen a revolution in the video projection business. A revolution no one expected. The prices of home theater front projectors have been dropping nearly as fast as flat panel displays.

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Shane Buettner Posted: Feb 16, 2007 0 comments
  • $6,300
  • 1920x1080 three-chip D-ILA
  • Key Connections: Dual HDMI inputs, one component inputs, one RS-232
Features We Like: Accepts 1080p/24 and 1080p/60 signals (displays at 60fps in either case), new imaging chips and improved light engine obtain deeper blacks and better contrast without a dynamic iris
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Posted: Jan 28, 2007 0 comments

CEDIA 2006 was something of a riches to rags story. We saw many three-chip 1080p DLP projectors announced at prices that were ridiculous and embarrassing, stretching into the many tens of thousands of dollars. And they were introduced with straight faces. Granted, these are high light output designs that can drive enormous screens. But I didn't find these many of these designs particularly interesting. Too many recently announced projectors appear to be aimed at the ultra-wealthy sliver of the market, and don't back up their high prices by offering technical innovation that can't be found in more reasonably priced models. About the only things these announcements did was to make the $15-20K single-chip DLPs seem like they aren't quite as hideously over priced!

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Shane Buettner Posted: Jan 18, 2007 0 comments
  • $1,999 (est. street price)
  • 1280x768 single-chip DLP
  • Key Connections: One HDMI input
Features We Like: Faroudja processing
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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jan 14, 2007 0 comments

When 1080p home theater projectors were introduced a year or so ago, a funny thing happened on the way to the party.

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Ultimate AV Staff Posted: Dec 20, 2006 0 comments

<IMG SRC="/images/archivesart/1206epson1080p.jpg" WIDTH=390 HEIGHT=204>

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Dec 03, 2006 0 comments

The Sharp XV-Z20000 is the third 1080p single-chip DLP projector to pass through our doors. At $11,999 it bucks a growing trend to less expensive, high resolution projectors. But it's far lower in price than competitors such as the $20,000 <A HREF=" http://ultimateavmag.com/videoprojectors/506marantzvp11s1/"> Marantz VP-11S1</A> or SIM2's $15K <A HREF="http://www.ultimateavmag.com/firstlookvideoprojectors/506sim2ht3000/">
HT3000</A>. And it offers a lot for the money.

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Posted: Nov 19, 2006 0 comments

Sony took official ownership of CEDIA 2006 on Day 1 when it officially announced the VPL-VW50 SXRD front projector. Sony had previously lit the world on fire with the VPL-VW100<A HREF="http://ultimateavmag.com/videoprojectors/1205sony/">"Ruby"</A>, a fully outfitted three-chip 1080p SXRD projector with a retail of $10K, which was significantly less money than the premium single-chip 720p DLPs that ruled the day when it was released in Fall 2005 (not to mention that is a full two-thirds cheaper than Sony's first SXRD front pro, the <A HREF="http://ultimateavmag.com/videoprojectors/504sony/">Qualia 004</A>).

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Shane Buettner Posted: Nov 16, 2006 0 comments
  • $4,000 (MAP)
  • 1920x1080 three-chip LCD
  • Key Connections: Dual HDMI inputs
Features We Like: Dynamic iris for deep blacks, motorized zoom and focus, vertical and horizontal lens shift, Color Management System
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Ultimate AV Staff Posted: Nov 16, 2006 0 comments

<IMG SRC="/images/archivesart/1106panasonicptae1000u.jpg" WIDTH=449 HEIGHT=240>

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Nov 15, 2006 0 comments
HD projection on a budget.

Sure, 1080p is getting all the buzz, but even the cheapest 1080p displays are still really pricey. For example, the lowest-priced 1080p projector is 4.5 times the price of this little Optoma. The HD70, while "only" 720p, has a distinction all its own that makes it one of the coolest products to come out in months: It's the lowest-priced HD projector ever.

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