PLASMA TV REVIEWS

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Joel Brinkley Posted: Aug 14, 2003 0 comments

VInc. is a new company with a filial relationship to Princeton Graphics, a maker of computer displays and a line of commercial DTVs. The companies share a major investor in William Wang, and V Inc. has ambitious plans for the world of consumer electronics.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jun 27, 2003 0 comments

"Remarkable things are happening in the plasma-display market . . . a big, flat screen hanging on the wall has universal appeal."

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Joel Brinkley Posted: May 24, 2003 0 comments

More than a year ago, Zenith shook up the world of plasma televisions by introducing the DPD60W, the first 60-inch model&mdash;a behemoth that seemed to fill up a room. For Zenith, it was a statement product and a wonder to behold, though its performance problems held it back from the first rank of plasma displays (see the review in the January 2002 <I>SGHT</I>, also available archived at <A HREF="http://www.guidetohometheater.com">www.guidetohometheater.com</A>).

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Mike Wood Posted: Mar 05, 2003 Published: Mar 06, 2003 0 comments
Eight plasma displays go head to head.,

Yes, you heard right, kiddies. The plasma antichrist (me) is performing a comparison of eight mostly industrial-strength plasma displays. Will I deride them all? Probably. Will their beauteous splendor turn me to the dark side? Possibly. Will I lose my mind in the process? Read on to find out.

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Kevin Miller Posted: Feb 11, 2003 Published: Feb 12, 2003 0 comments
Gateway has thrown down the gauntlet in the budget-plasma arena.

Plasma panel prices continue to drop precipitously as the technology gets hotter and hotter. Gateway, provider of digital-technology solutions, has entered the home theater market with the GTW-P42M102 42-inch plasma panel, which has a native resolution of 852 by 480 in progressive-scan mode. It's a perfect example of plasma's ongoing price reduction. The streamlined display is 25.2 inches high, 40.8 inches wide, and a very slim 3.7 inches deep, and it weighs less than 70 pounds. The handsomely designed set sports a silver finish with a small, dark border surrounding the screen. The GTW-P42M102's performance characteristics are a mixed bag; however, at a list price of $2,999, there's no denying that it's the best value by a country mile in the 42-inch-plasma-panel category.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Dec 28, 2002 0 comments

Until recently, plasma display technology has been more of a conceptual thrill than anything most serious videophiles would relish making the centerpiece of a home theater. True, thin is sexy, and, as they say, you can never be too thin or too sexy. But gray and washed-out is not sexy. Nor is mediocre resolution, that glazed look plasma displays often exhibit, or the high price of admission.

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Peter Putman Posted: Nov 21, 2002 0 comments

For better or worse, electronic display technology is going flat. Slowly but surely, as Asian manufacturers jettison older high-volume, low-profit picture- and projection-tube assembly lines, the venerable cathode-ray tube is being supplanted by such exotic items as Digital Light Processing (DLP), and liquid-crystal display (LCD) and plasma display panels (PDPs).

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 16, 2002 0 comments

Plasma displays are a hot ticket in today's video market, generating a nearly universal "Wow!" reaction from first-time viewers. Fujitsu's new 61-inch-diagonal PDS-6101 has a picture nearly as big as the largest rear-projection sets, but weighs less than half as much. Even better, like all plasmas, it takes up no floor space when hung on a wall. That feature alone has probably accounted for much of the technology's appeal, despite the still high price of admission. Yes, prices are dropping rapidly, but while some of the smallest sets are getting close to the target sought by most manufacturers&mdash;$100 per diagonal inch&mdash;larger screens are still a long way from that goal.

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Ron Williams Posted: Oct 05, 2002 Published: Oct 06, 2002 0 comments
High-tech meets classical art.

In the home theater display realm, "some day" has finally arrived. As you've read in past issues of Home Theater, the world of technology is advancing, and we're all the better for it. We now reap the benefits of the microchip's evolution. Several audio DSP chips offer improved sound processing, and advanced video-processing chips have helped display technology take large steps forward.

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Ron Williams Posted: Jul 11, 2002 Published: Jul 12, 2002 0 comments
An all-in-one plasma television.

There's a new wave in consumer plasma panels, and Sony's KZ-42TS1 is riding it. What makes this model different from all of the other plasma panels we've reviewed? The KZ-42TS1 is a self-contained unit with a built-in NTSC tuner and two stereo speakers incorporated into the bottom of the frame. This HD-ready WEGA model has a 1,024-by-1,024 resolution, is mounted in a panel measuring 30.125 inches high by 41.625 inches wide by 5 inches thick, and is framed by a 2-inch brushed-silver border.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Feb 19, 2002 0 comments

Remarkable things are happening in the plasma-display market. Just the other day I saw one for sale in Costco for under $6000. Costco! While one might ponder the cosmic significance of plasma televisions at a warehouse retailer, there's no denying that these displays attract a lot of attention. A big, flat screen hanging on the wall has universal appeal.

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William Finch Posted: Jan 03, 2002 Published: Jan 04, 2002 0 comments
The PL-61cx's 61-inch screen size and impressive features package put this panel in a class by itself.

Plasma, that sexy, newfangled display technology, is growing by leaps and bounds. Not long ago, 42-inch-diagonal, 16:9 panels were the only game in town. Then came the 50-inch HD-ready models from a small handful of manufacturers. Now, we're seeing a few behemoth models in the 60- and 61-inch categories from a few bold manufacturers like Marantz, Zenith, LG, and NEC. Runco has also jumped into the fray with the PlasmaWall PL-61cx, a 61-inch panel and the subject of today's review.

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Ron Williams Posted: Sep 30, 2001 Published: Oct 01, 2001 0 comments
Plasma technology is getting bigger, better, and cheaper.

Everything about flat-panel monitors is growing—from panel size to market size. A flat-panel display can utilize one of several different technologies, and Sony has chosen plasma technology for their newest flat panel, the PFM-42B1. Not too long ago, 16:9-shaped plasma displays measured only 38 inches and cost close to $18,000, but times are changing. Like all plasmas, the 42-inch PFM-42B1 is only a monitor—it has no built-in TV tuner. However, it does have one of the highest pixel counts of any plasma display on the market: 1,024 by 1,024. And, in order to get plasma technology into the home, Sony has priced this display at $7,999 for both the consumer and commercial markets.

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Kevin Miller Posted: Jul 31, 2001 Published: Aug 01, 2001 0 comments
Proof that plasma technology is evolving, Marantz's PD5010D plasma display is a solid HD monitor that's perfect for your wall.

In the last couple of years, plasma displays have become increasingly popular. The technology has also come a long way in terms of picture quality. Initially, plasma's biggest performance pitfalls were in the areas of black level and color accuracy. Thanks to recent technological advances, black-level performance has improved significantly, but it still has a long way to go. Another performance issue with plasmas is something called "false contouring," which manifests itself as crawling patches or blotches of noise.

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Mike Wood Posted: Aug 27, 2000 Published: Aug 28, 2000 0 comments
The Revox E-542 42-inch plasma monitor lets you custom-tailor your TV to your décor.

"WOW!" That was about the only word photographer Randy Cordero and I could muster as we took the bright-yellow-framed plasma set out of its shipping carton. Sure, we'd seen plasma monitors before, but none as striking as this one. We had specially ordered the E-542 in Ferrari yellow, for no other reason than because we could. Revox offers a number of different frames for the display to match your yacht, aircraft, or bedroom décor. It turns out that this isn't the only customizable option either.

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