PLASMA TV REVIEWS

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jul 09, 2007 0 comments
A good flat panel with a punchy image, good color and detail, an excellent remote control, and a tempting price.

When HP introduced its first line of televisions, after years as a leader in home computers, it featured both flat panel and rear projection sets. Now, however, the company sells flat panel LCD and plasma designs exclusively. Its two new LCD models are both 1080p. Its two plasmas are both 768p—an odd number that originated in the computer world and manages to linger on, at least in plasma designs.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Jun 30, 2007 0 comments
The $3,999 TH-50PZ750U is in Panasonic's first group of 50" 1080p consumer plasma televisions. There is even a 50" model in the 700 series that offers fewer features than the set we're reviewing here, but costs $500 less.
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Thomas J. Norton Posted: May 06, 2007 0 comments

The TH-50PZ750U is in Panasonic's first group of 50" 1080p consumer plasma televisions. There is even a 50" model in the 700 series that offers fewer features than the set we're reviewing here, but costs $500 less.

Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Apr 10, 2007 Published: Mar 11, 2007 0 comments
Who says you can't stream HDTV?

As more consumers embrace high-speed home networking and video downloads, one question is gaining prominence: Can't we view this content on something a little more substantial than our computer monitors? Yes, you can, thanks to the digital media receiver, which is a device that lets you stream video, photo, and music files from your computer to your television.

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Shane Buettner Posted: Apr 07, 2007 0 comments
  • $1,799
  • 50" Plasma
  • 1366x768
  • Key Connections: One HDMI and two component inputs, one PC/DVI input
Features We Like: OTA HD tuner
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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Mar 03, 2007 0 comments

When you think of Hewlett-Packard you don't think first of test gear or televisions. But HP began life as a manufacturer of specialized test and medical equipment. Today, however, it's the world's largest seller of home and business computers.

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Thomas J. Norton Posted: Feb 17, 2007 0 comments

<I>The original text of this review stated that the Pioneer Elite PRO-940HD will not accept native 1080p/24 material. That was incorrect. It will. The set will not, however, accept a native 1080p/60 source. In addition, the set includes two NTSC tuners (useful in the split-screen and picture-in-picture modes), a fact not noted in the text but now added to the Specifications section. &mdash;Ed</I>.

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Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Feb 15, 2007 0 comments
Finally, 1080p plasma.

Tired of getting beaten up by LCD's marketing machine, Pioneer said, "Fine, here. . ." and released to the world the ultraexpensive but gorgeous PRO-FHD1 plasma. Sure, it's 8 grand, but it's 1080p and offers impressive performance across the board.

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Joel Brinkley Posted: Jan 21, 2007 0 comments

Panasonic's video division has staked its life on plasma televisions. So far it looks like a pretty good bet. Sure, the company sells flat panel LCD and rear projection LCD and DLP TVs. But newspapers, magazines and televisions are host to countless Panasonic ads for plasmas and nary a one for the other technologies. And have you seen Panasonic promotions for an "LCD Concierge" service like one offered for its plasmas? All of this is paying off. Panasonic sells one-third of all plasmas sold in the United States &ndash; more than any other company.

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Shane Buettner Posted: Jan 18, 2007 0 comments
  • $3,300
  • 42" Plasma
  • 1024x768
  • Key Connections: Dual HDMI and component inputs
Features We Like: Accepts 1080p/24 signals and displays them at 72Hz, Home Media Gallery, ISF ccc Calibration Ready, OTA and CableCARD HD tuners
Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Nov 21, 2006 Published: Nov 22, 2006 0 comments
HDMI: It's not just for video anymore.

HDMI is a wonderful invention filled with promise. When utilized to its fullest, it can offer the best of both worlds: uncompressed audio and video signals and intelligent, two-way communication over a single cable. Manufacturers have long teased us with talk of complete home theater systems that you can set up using just two or three cables, but the reality has fallen far short of the promise. Most designers have used HDMI only as a top-grade video connector, paying little attention to its audio and communication abilities. Armed with the new HDMI 1.2a spec (the products here were designed and released before 1.3 was finalized), Panasonic is aiming for the ultimate in connection and control with their new EZ Sync HDAVI Control products.

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Posted: Nov 19, 2006 0 comments

Once upon a time Pioneer Elite was <I>the</I> choice for a serious enthusiast in the market for a CRT-based RPTV. They had the best out of the box image there was, and in fact, I often felt as a calibrator that I was seldom offering more than a touch-up on those sets. They were great sets, and priced to match that high level of performance.

Geoffrey Morrison Posted: Oct 24, 2006 Published: Oct 25, 2006 0 comments
Monocromaticness.

It's a fact of life that not all people can fit speakers into their living rooms. This could be for size reasons or, shall we say, more personal reasons. This fact has not gone unnoticed in the speaker world, which has been struggling for years with a declining market for big traditional speakers. In-walls have been a choice, but even the best in-walls have to make compromises that often end up being audible. On-walls are a newer choice that manufacturers hope will take out some of the concessions inherent in in-wall mountings. More recently, several companies have begun offering "sound bars" that give you multiple channels of sound from one long speaker that you can mount under your plasma or LCD. Leon is one such company that custom builds all of their speakers. Before they can build you one, though, you have to choose a plasma.

Thomas J. Norton Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

While it may not have the head-scratching cosmic significance of the classic choice between Goobers and Raisinettes, or even the HD DVD vs. Blu-ray format war, the LCD vs. plasma question remains a hot topic. The casual shopper may simply want a flat panel TV no matter what the technology, but the serious videophile wants to know more.

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