OTHER TECH

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Ken C. Pohlmann Posted: Oct 02, 2005 0 comments

As I unpacked the box, I kept asking myself, "Yes, but where are all the speakers?" Your friends will ask, too, when they see the SurroundWorks 200 from Cambridge SoundWorks - and might wonder if you've decamped from the 21st century and returned to the days of mono.

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Michael Gaughn Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Five years ago, if you'd asked a home theater nut if you could play Metal Gear Solid on his 50-inch screen, he probably would have beaten you about the head and neck with a copy of the Die Hard trilogy and banished you from the room.

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John Sciacca Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

When someone says he's an accountant, a stockbroker, or a trash collector (excuse me, "Sanitation Engineer"), you know what he does for a living. But when I say I'm a custom electronics installer, I usually get a blank stare in return.

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James K. Willcox Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Jarring juxtapositions of technology and design might work for the sets in a Tim Burton movie, but they usually don't for someone's home. Many custom installers find that adding high-tech gear to an older house with a well-defined architectural style can be daunting because the technology can clash with or overpower the traditional design.

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Posted: Sep 30, 2005 0 comments
We've added three products to The List for October. Printer specialist HP put a color scientist in charge of creating the company's first rear-projection TV, a 65-inch 1080p monster no less, and just about slam-dunked it. Escient gets a nod for making its highly evolved FireBall music-server technology available for half the cost of prior models.
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David Ranada Posted: Sep 19, 2005 0 comments

Nothing beats using home movies to evaluate TVs. You choose what to shoot so you can stress a specific aspect of screen performance. Since you're the cameraman, you know precisely what each scene is supposed to look like.

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Posted: Sep 13, 2005 0 comments
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Jamie Sorcher Posted: Sep 11, 2005 0 comments

The days of going to an electronics store, choosing from a lineup of components, and carrying your selection out to the trunk of your car might be fading fast. We now want our entertainment with us all the time, wherever we go, but few of us have the time to wade through the overwhelming proliferation of gear being created to address that desire.

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John Sciacca Posted: Sep 08, 2005 0 comments

Buying a home theater system used to mean going to a swanky boutique where a designer deftly guided you through the process. Like a tailored suit, your system was carefully assembled one component at a time after hours of diligent auditioning.

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Posted: Sep 08, 2005 0 comments

1 Master and Commander (collectors edition, 20th Century Fox)

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Ken C. Pohlmann Posted: Sep 06, 2005 0 comments

Sorry to break the news, but your shiny, spiffy iPod is an obsolete piece of junk. Ditto the other electronic toys you tote in your L.L. Bean knapsack. They'll soon be vacuumed up, integrated, and reissued as a new paradigm that we can't live without.

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Posted: Sep 05, 2005 0 comments
From Reservoir Dogs.
I hear you're calling in from the set of The Sopranos. I'm directing the next episode - Episode 5. We're in preproduction right now.
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Posted: Sep 05, 2005 0 comments
I watched the show when it was first on the air in 2001 and 2002 and have been waiting for it to come to DVD for a long time myself - so it must be satisfying for you to finally have all 19 episodes in one place on DVD. Yeah, it really is.
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Posted: Sep 05, 2005 0 comments
It must be very satisfying for you to see one of your pet creations finally make it to DVD. My wife and I were just watching the DVD, and it looks terrific. It was fun to see again after all these years.

You did commentary tracks on the first two episodes ["License to Steele" and "Tempered Steele"] along with your co-creator, Robert Butler.

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Michael Antonoff Posted: Sep 04, 2005 0 comments

What time-shifting was to the VCR generation, place-shifting is becoming to the home-network-enabled. Extending personal entertainment to every room in your home is the mission of SkipJam, a company whose main product is the iMedia Center, a box you can attach to multiple A/V components including your cable or satellite receiver, home theater receiver, DVD player, and TV.

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