MUSIC DISC & DOWNLOAD REVIEWS

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Mark Fleischmann Posted: Aug 26, 2005 0 comments
Imagine the score for a 33-minute film noir with nonstop action. That's Béla Bartók's The Miraculous Mandarin in a nutshell, although it's actually a one-act dance suite. The story concerns three thugs who use a young woman as bait to rob a series of victims, culminating in the Mandarin. They murder him—but not before he consummates his passion for the girl. The plot had enough sex and violence to get it banned immediately upon its 1926 debut in Köln, Germany.
Mark Fleischmann Posted: Aug 04, 2005 0 comments
Even people who know nothing about Brazilian music recognize the urbane Latin syncopation of the bossa nova beat. The language, of course, is Portuguese, not Spanish. The key names in Brazilian pop music are Jobim and Gilberto; in orchestral and chamber music, Villa-Lobos. Arguably, the most alluring voice in Brazilian music today belongs to Rosa Passos, who partners with jazz bassist Ron Carter on this audiophile release.
Adrienne Maxwell Posted: Jun 26, 2005 0 comments
By mere coincidence (or perhaps not), I sat down to review this new hybrid SACD on the rare rainy day in Los Angeles (although not quite as rare this winter). The two were a perfect fit. The Jazz Kamerata has a comfortable warmth about it, inviting you to wrap yourself in it and settle in for a lazy afternoon.
Ken Richardson Posted: Oct 21, 2002 0 comments

THE ROLLING STONES Remastered Series ABKCO Music: SACD Sound: SACD Series:
We interrupt our program of covering multichannel music to take you back to the days of stereo-and even mono! But this isn't just any old stuff, it's the (one-time) greatest rock & roll band in the world, the Rolling Stones.
Robert Ripps Posted: Dec 10, 2001 0 comments

Tune in a classical FM radio station or attend a symphony orchestra concert, and chances are you'll hear very little music composed after 1900.

Francis Davis Posted: Oct 16, 2001 0 comments

Clichés are truisms, Jack Kerouac once reasoned, and therefore true. But maybe not always - or at least not completely. One of the many clichés about Miles Davis is that beginning with cool in the late 1940s and ending with fusion 20 years later, he anticipated nearly every significant movement in jazz after be bop.

Parke Puterbaugh Posted: Jun 10, 2001 0 comments

The first time I heard Everyday, I thought it was terrible, a train wreck of Led Zeppelin, fusion, and grunge. The material seemed contrived, formless, and prickly. And then I kept listening, adapted to it, and rather grew to like it.

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