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CES 2010

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 10, 2009 0 comments

Sure enough, Hitachi is demonstrating wireless HDMI using ADI's JPEG2000 codec and UWB wireless transmission. The LCD TV is the current Ultra Thin model with an outboard input/tuner/processor box (on the floor) whose output is connected to a transmitter (on the riser next to the box) that sends the signal to a receiver (mounted on the TV's pedestal), which is connected to the TV's HDMI input. The picture looked fine to me under less-than-ideal conditions.

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uavGary Altunian Posted: Jan 10, 2009 0 comments

RBH Sound showed its new high performance Signature Series speakers, dubbed the 8300-SE and the reference version, the 8300-SE/R. The 8300-SE features three 8-inch aluminum cone subwoofers, two 6.5-inch mid-bass drivers and 1-inch soft dome tweeter. The 8300-SE/R, shown in the photo has upgraded 6.5-inch mid-bass drivers with a phase plug, a liquid-cooled Scanspeak silk dome tweeter and a modified crossover network resulting in increased power handling capacity. The 8300 speakers can be bi-amped or bi-wired.

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uavGary Altunian Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

Focal of France showed their new 814V 2 1⁄2-way bass reflex tower speaker with one 6 1⁄2" woofer, a 6 1⁄2" mid-bass driver and a 1" inverted dome tweeter. The gloss black finish on the 814V is designed to complement a flat panel television with a gloss black bezel. The 814V is available now with a suggested retail price of $1795/pair.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

You may not have heard of Analog Devices, Inc. because the company makes integrated circuits and other components, not consumer products. But ADI is big into video. I saw a demo of a video-transmission system based on JPEG2000, the same compression technology used in digital cinema. Dubbed HDAnywhere, the system can be used to send video over any wired or wireless medium very efficiently. The demo included two TVs displaying the same content—one was receiving conventional HDMI over fiber-optic cable while the other got its signal wirelessly using UWB (ultra wideband) over a distance of 50 feet. There was a slight delay in the wireless image, but they were nearly identical otherwise. Hitachi is shipping a TV with an outboard input/processor box that uses HDAnywhere via UWB, which I'll take a close look at when I get over the Hitachi booth.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

Italian SIM2 is another company known for ultra-high-end projectors, including the new and improved flagship HT5000E introduced at CES with three DarkChip 4 DMDs. If you have to ask how much, you can't afford it, but I'll tell you anyway—$66,000 for the projector with your choice of 16:9 lens. If you want the ISCO 3 anamorphic lens and sled, that'll be another $15,500. The projector looked spectacular on a 116" Da-Lite Affinity screen. The single-chip Domino D60 (pictured) is more down to earth at $5000, and adding a Panamorph anamorphic lens and sled with mounting bracket brings the total cost to $9000.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

Unlike WirelessHD, which I wrote about yesterday, Amimon's WHDI (Wireless HD Interface) is now included in several TVs, but they are only available in Japan. Sony's Bravia Wireless Link module and Belkin's FlyWire also use WHDI and are available in the US. WHDI uses the 5GHz band to transmit up to 1080p/60 with second-generation chips over a distance of up to 30 meters through walls with a latency of less than 1ms. Amimon's hotel suite has 10 streams going at once across three rooms in addition to WiFi in the same 5GHz band with impressive results. Pictured are two WHDI receiver modules—a major reduction is size from the suitcase-sized box I saw a couple of years ago. Members of the WHDI Consortium include LG, Sharp, Sony, Hitachi, and Samsung.

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Scott Wilkinson Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

French projector maker DreamVision is known for very high-end—and high-cost—front projectors, but its new Dream'E bucks this trend with a retail price of only $5300. Sporting a curvaceous shell, the projector uses Sony SXRD imaging chips with a custom light engine. It can also accommodate a fixed Panamorph anamorphic lens for a package price of only $9600 or a Schneider lens with sled for a price yet to be determined. There are three user memories per input and no dynamic iris, examples of a philosophy I share.

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uavGary Altunian Posted: Jan 09, 2009 1 comments

British audio manufacturer Cambridge Audio has unveiled its new Azur 640R Version 2 7.1-channel AV receiver and the Azur 640BD Blu-ray player at CES 2009.

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uavKim Wilson Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

For years it was all about Home Theater, however, its clear the home entertainment experience is going way beyond that. D-Box uses transducers and motion sensing algorithms to bring a new dimension to watching movies and playing video games. The chairs are not only comfortable for playing your favorite driving games, they pull you into the action as you feel every curve and bump in the road. The chairs range from $3K to $15K. They also make home theater chairs with motion sensing. Also, get ready for the D-Box experience in your local theater, with the upcoming release of the Fast and Furious.

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uavGary Altunian Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

You may not know the NXT name, but it's possible you've heard their flat panel speakers, which are found in products ranging from automobiles, LCD televisions and portable PC speakers. NXT is a manufacturer that licenses their unique flat panel speaker designs to various companies and at this year's CES they showed the Q-AV System, an adjustable LCR speaker that adjusts from 37 to 52-inches in width to accommodate plasma or LCD televisions of various sizes. The LCR system shown in the photo has three full range drivers and was accompanied by a subwoofer and flat panel rear speakers. No price was available.

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uavGary Altunian Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

The weather in Las Vegas is ideal with slightly chilly mornings, light to moderate winds and clear skies that allow visibility for dozens of miles. This view taken from the 30th floor of the Hilton Hotel is looking northeast past Nellis Air Force Base in the distance and towards the barren Nevada desert. The image at the top of the photo is a reflection of a chandelier in the glass, not a UFO. Area 51 is many miles from here.

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uavGary Altunian Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

In conjunction with showing their 60th anniversary legacy products, McIntosh is introducing the new MX-150 AV controller featuring Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio decoding, HDMI 1.3 capability Room Perfect auto-EQ functionality. The Room Perfect system was developed by Steinway-Lyngdorf, a Danish company that also manufactures high-end audio components. I've used the Room Perfect room equalization system in my listening room with excellent sonic results. The MX-150 also includes software for additional set-up and equalization functions to fine tune it for each installation.

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uavKim Wilson Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

While the ZeeVee offers a more sophisticated solution, with their own UI, Altona is sure to sell a ton of their simple USB to HDMI converter, the HDPix. Priced at $179, the convertor allows you to hook up your computer via USB to any TV (or projector) with HDMI. Its also Mac and PC compatible. On the input side there is both a USB port and a mini jack that you plug into the audio output of your computer. The converter automatically embeds the audio into the HDMI out. I don't see this as a high end solution but it surely is an inexpensive solution for getting your computer output to a TV.

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uavKim Wilson Posted: Jan 09, 2009 1 comments

ZeeVee started delivering product in the fall of 08, so they are hardly a household name yet. What they offer is a solution for integrating your computer, not just your files, to a remote TV or even your home theater. The ZeeVee interface offers a simple scroll and click interface with icons for key internet sites where you can watch TV programs such as Hulu.com, CBS, Fox, CNN etc. Like many other networking systems, you can access the media files on your computer. However, ZeeVee goes a step further and does something I have not seen yet. Your entire desktop is now on a TV in another part of your house, so not only can you browse the internet you can open you applications and launch into Word, Photoshop, or whatever. The basic unit is not exactly cheap at $499 though it includes an RF remote & transmitter that sits at your computer. A RF keyboard is on the way to complete the integration (Price-TBA). Currently, it is only PC compatible but the Mac firmware upgrade should be available in late Q1.

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uavGary Altunian Posted: Jan 09, 2009 0 comments

Las Vegas is very visually deceiving. Buildings, signs and objects are so large in Las Vegas they appear much closer than they really are. Case in point: The Las Vegas Hilton is next door to the LV Convention Center, but walking from one to the other can take 20-30 minutes or more . Last night I attended an event at the Wynn, which is next door to the Venetian. A friend suggested we walk rather than drive. After convincing him that was a mistake, we drove from one parking garage to the other and the distance turned out to be more than 1/2 mile. I have nothing against a good walk except when carrying my laptop computer and the tons of literature collected at the show. Gotta go, it's time to walk the convention floor, which is over 1.5 million square feet! Despite the saying that "Everything is bigger in Texas", the Lone Star state has nothing over Las Vegas.

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