AUDIO VIDEO NEWS

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HT Staff Posted: Jul 05, 2001 0 comments
Which is more important in a DVD player, styling or performance?
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Jon Iverson Posted: Jul 01, 2001 0 comments

Just imagine if you could have this for your home theater system: <A HREF="www.ibm.com">IBM</A> announced last week the T220, which the company is calling the world's highest-resolution flat panel monitor. Unfortunately for us, IBM says that the new display will enable "photograph-quality" imaging for science, banking, engineering, publishing, medicine, and business-critical visualization tasks, and is not likely to appear in consumer living rooms anytime soon.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jul 01, 2001 0 comments

Remember that scene in the Wizard of Oz when our heroes are making their way through the forest chanting "lions, tigers, and bears, oh my! . . . lions, tigers, and bears, oh my!" Well, the movie business is apparently chanting "hackers, pirates, and peers" as they work their way through the digital media jungle. A new report released online last week details just how scary the future may or may not be for the Hollywood suits.

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Barry Willis Posted: Jul 01, 2001 0 comments

A threatened strike against the entertainment industry by actors will probably be avoided. Negotiators for film studios and television networks, and for two actors' unions, worked late Saturday, June 30 and resumed work Sunday morning in an effort to avoid a strike. The situation is a replay of one enacted two months ago by writers and producers, who arrived at an agreement May 4.

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Posted: Jul 01, 2001 0 comments

Less than seven years after putting its first satellite in position, <A HREF="http://www.directv.com">DirecTV</A> has signed its ten millionth subscriber. The El Sugundo, CA&ndash;based direct broadcast satellite service now claims ten percent of the US television market.

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Gary Frisch Posted: Jul 01, 2001 0 comments

<I>Brendan Fraser, Elizabeth Hurley, Frances O'Connor, Orlando Jones, Miriam Shor, Brian Doyle-Murray. Directed by Harold Ramis. Aspect ratio: 2.35:1 (anamorphic). Dolby Digital 5.1. 93 minutes. 2000. Fox Home Entertainment 2000815. PG-13. $26.98.</I>

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Posted: Jul 01, 2001 0 comments

"In George Orwell's novel <I>1984</I>, everyone had a television in their home that monitored their every move," reads a June 26 report from the <A HREF="http://www.cme.org/access/index_acc.html">Center for Digital Democracy</A>, a Washington-based advocacy group. Orwell's good citizens dutifully watch, and are watched in turn, their every move tracked and recorded.

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HT Staff Posted: Jun 26, 2001 0 comments
The quality of electrical power is often the limiting factor for high performance audio and video systems. Many manufacturers have attempted to address this limitation---caused in large part by electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio frequency interference (RFI)---by designing and marketing surge protectors, AC line filters, uninterruptible power supplies, and various sorts of AC enhancers and generators. Many of these solutions are bulky, expensive, or only partially effective.
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HT Staff Posted: Jun 26, 2001 0 comments
The surround processor is the heart of every high-end home theater system. Good ones, like Myryad Systems' MDP500, have flexibility built in for unanticipated new formats.
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Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

Shipments of digital television products in May almost doubled over the same period last year, according to figures released June 20 by the <A HREF=http://www.cea.org>Consumer Electronics Association</A>.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

EchoStar's Mark Jackson puts it succinctly: "Our customers want access to more channels, and they are increasingly demanding bandwidth-intensive HDTV channels." But there is only so much bandwidth available between the satellite in the sky and the dish on the ground, and that bandwidth is carefully divided among channels. The more channels on the system, the less bandwidth available for added features like HDTV.

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Jon Iverson Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

Last week, <A HREF="http://www.st.com">STMicroelectronics</A>, which manufactures semiconductor devices used in set-top boxes (STBs), High Definition Television (HDTV), and other sophisticated digital consumer equipment, announced what it describes as the "world's most advanced chip" for the HDTV market. STM says that the new STi7020 "brings an unprecedented level of integration to the HDTV industry" and adds that the chip is expected to play a key role in the transition from standard definition to HDTV technology.

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Barry Willis Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

If it were legal, how would you record a high definition television program? High-definition digital video signals propagate at a data rate of 24Mbits/second, a rate that would quickly fill up the approximately five gigabytes of storage available on standard recordable DVDs. That's barely enough to record a half-hour sitcom, if the commercials were deleted.

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Wes Phillips Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

<I>Ed Harris, Anne Heche, Armin Mueller-Stahl, Michael Rispoli, Charles Haid, James Gallanders. Directed by Agnieszka Holland. Aspect ratios: 1.85:1 (anamorphic), 4:3 (full-screen). Dolby Digital 2.0. 118 minutes. 1999. Sony Pictures Classics 04755. R. $29.95.</I>

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Barry Willis Posted: Jun 24, 2001 0 comments

The cable industry continues to be the major obstacle to expanding the market for digital television (DTV). That's the view of the <A HREF="http://www.ce.org/">Consumer Electronics Association</A>, which in June asked the <A HREF="http://www.fcc.gov">Federal Communications Commission</A> to consider instituting what it termed "a capacity-based dual or multicast cable carriage rule" to encourage the growth of the format.

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